University Bio - Miao Qian

Miao Qian

Assistant Professor of Psychology

Miao Qian
Contact Info:
Campus: McNichols Campus
Building: Reno Hall
Room: 218
Phone: 617-909-4761
Miao Qian

Degrees

  • Ph.D., University of Toronto
  • M.A., Zhejiang Normal University, China
  • B.S., Zhejiang University of Finance and Economics, China

Biography

Miao Qian (pronounced Mee-Aw, Chi-en) earned her Ph.D. in Developmental Psychology and Education from the University of Toronto, Canada. Qian joined the University of Detroit Mercy in 2021 after completing two years of postdoctoral psychology training in the Inequality in American Initiative program at Harvard University.

Qian teaches graduate and undergraduate courses in developmental psychology. Her research interest is in child social cognition, to answer the questions about how children acquire knowledge of social categories, such as race and gender, and how they use the knowledge to perceive, evaluate and judge others.

Qian’s research sits across developmental and social psychology, using methodologies and theories from cognitive, social-cognitive and developmental psychology. She currently has two lines of research: (1) The origin and root of implicit intergroup bias and the social-cognitive factors that drive bias development; (2) the malleability of implicit social biases, such as racial bias and gender bias, and interventions to reduce them in childhood.

Learn more about Miao Qian at https://miaoqian.wixsite.com/miaoqian

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    Publications

    2021 and in press

    • Qian, M., Heyman, G. D., Quinn, P. C., Messi F. A., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2021). Age-related differences in implicit and explicit racial biases in Cameroonians. Developmental Psychology.

    2020

    • Singh, L., Quinn, P. C., Qian, M., & Lee, K. (2020). Bilingualism is associated with less racial bias in preschool children. Developmental Psychology.
    • Qian, M., Yu, C., Fu, G., Cirelli, L. (2020). Shaping children’s racial bias through interpersonal movement. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology.
    • Qian, M., Wang, Y.*, Wong, W. I., Fu, G., Zuo, B., VanderLaan, D. P. (2020). The impacts of race, gender, and gender-typed behavior on children’s friendship appraisals. Archives of Sexual Behavior.

    2019

    • Qian, M. K., Heyman, G. D., Quinn, P. C., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2019). Differential developmental courses of implicit and explicit biases for different other-race classes. Developmental Psychology, 55, 1440–1452.
    • Qian, M. K., Quinn, P. C., Heyman, G. D, Pascalis, O., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2019). A long-term effect of perceptual individuation training on reducing implicit racial bias in preschool children. Child Development, 90, 290-305.
    • Setoh, P., Lee, K. J. J., Zhang, L., Qian, M. K., Quinn, P. C., Heyman, G. D., & Lee, K. (2019). Racial categorization predicts implicit racial bias in preschool children. Child Development, 90, 162-179.

    2017

    • Qian, M. K., Quinn, P. C., Heyman, G. D., Pascalis, O., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2017). Perceptual individuation training (but not mere exposure) reduces implicit racial bias in preschool children. Developmental Psychology, 53, 845–859.
    • Qian, M. K., Heyman, G., Quinn, P., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2017). When the majority becomes the minority: A longitudinal study of the effects of immersive experience with racial out-group members on implicit and explicit racial biases. Journal of Cross-Cultural Psychology, 48, 914–930.

    2015

    • Qian, M. K., Heyman, G., Quinn, P., Messi, F., Fu, G., & Lee, K. (2015). Implicit racial biases in preschool children and adults from Asia and Africa. Child Development, 87, 285-296.
    • Wang, Q., Xiao, N., Quinn, P., Hu, C., Qian, M. K., Fu, G., Lee, K. (2015). Visual scanning and recognition of Chinese, Caucasian, and racially ambiguous faces: contributions from bottom-up facial physiognomic information and top-down knowledge of racial categories. Vision Research, 107, 67-75.
    • Heyman, G. D., Fu, G., Lin, J., Qian, M. K., & Lee, K. (2015). Eliciting promises from children reduces cheating. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 139, 242-248.