Interrogation and false confessions

October 22, 2013

Time: 2:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

Location: Briggs Building, room 201


Nick Braune

Nick Braune, associate professor of Philosophy at South Texas College, will give the presentation, "Police interrogation, false confessions and jurors' roles."

Police in the U.S. can legally use techniques of interrogation which use deception and induce stress, fear and confusion in the person interrogated. Although it is widely known that using these techniques can result in false confessions, jurors are rarely told this. Consequently, our jails are full of falsely convicted people. Braune will suggest that the general public, and especially jurors, should be educated about the methods of interrogations.

Braune has graduate degrees from University of Washington (Philosophy) and Drew University (Theological Studies). He writes a weekly peace and justice column for a local paper, has organized events on his campus, has spoken to a number of groups in the Rio Grande Valley and at national and international conferences and has published articles on the dangers of the penal state and on ethical violations by police and prosecutors.

The event is free and open to the public. For more information about CLASA and its events, see the CLASA website. This event is co-sponsored by CLASA and the Gesu Peace and Justice Committee.

RSVP: Unnecessary

Contact: Gail Presbey, CLASA director
Phone: 313-993-1124
Email: presbegm@udmercy.edu