Event

Film and Speakers: Human Terrain: War Becomes Academic

Thursday, April 7, 2011

Ford Life Sciences Building, Room 113, 4:00pm-6:30pm EDT

The 2010 film "Human Terrain" which explores the use of anthropologists and other social scientists by the military in their Afghanistan war operations will be shown, and then we'll talk to two academics (both anthropologists) who appear in the film and grapple with the issues of the relationship between academics and the military.

This recent film explores important issues. "Seeking to understand 'why they hate us', the US military adopts a new strategy of cultural awareness to win over the hearts and minds of the Iraqi and Afghan people. Controversy erupts when academics embed with combat troops and the war comes home to the university." We'll view the film, and then have a chance to talk to two academics (both anthropologists) who appear in the film and grapple with the issues of the relationship between academics and the military. This event is co-sponsored by UDM's Language and Cultural Training program.

For more information see: http://humanterrainmovie.com as well as http://www.counterpunch.org/gonzalez09272007.html

Roberto Gonzalez is a sociocultural anthropologist at San Jose State University whose work focuses upon the relationship between humans and their environment; science, technology, and society; militarism and culture; and anthropological ethics. His books include: Zapotec Science: Farming and Food in the Northern Sierra of Oaxaca (2001), Anthropologists in the Public Sphere: Speaking Out on War, Peace, and American Power (2004), and American Counterinsurgency: Human Science and the Human Terrain (2009). He is a founding member of the Network of Concerned Anthropologists and published a chapter "Embedded" in The Counter-Counterinsurgency Manual (2009).

Hugh Gusterson is a professor of Anthropology at George Mason University researching nuclear weapons, militarism, anthropology of science, social movements, pharmaceutical cultures, American culture, public anthropology, and social theory. He also writes about militarism and about science more generally, and has a strong interest in professional ethics. He is the author of Nuclear Rites (UC Press, 1996) and People of the Bomb (Minnesota, 2004) and co-editor of Cultures of Insecurity (Minnesota, 1999) and Why America's Top Pundits Are Wrong (UC Press, 2005), Why America's Top Pundits Are Wrong (UC Press, 2005), and The Insecure American (UC Press, 2009). He is a founding member of the Network of Concerned Anthropologists, a contributing editor to the Bulletin of Atomic Scientists, and published a chapter "Militarizing Knowledge" in The Counter-Counterinsurgency Manual (2009).

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