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2003-2005 UNDERGRADUATE CATALOG

College of Liberal Arts & Education

Office: 122 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Dean: Fr. John M. Staudenmaier, S.J.
Telephone: (313) 993-3250
Fax: (313) 993-1266
E-mail: staudejm@udmercy.edu
Website: liberalarts.udmercy.edu/

The mission of the College of Liberal Arts & Education is to cultivate intellectual versatility and a moral foundation so that students act with understanding, integrity, and compassion in their personal and professional lives.

The College is primarily an undergraduate teaching college based on scholarship and a commitment to engaging students in their development in the liberal disciplines.

The College's mission is realized primarily through its curriculum, which is also the heart of the University's Core Curriculum. This curriculum focuses on critical thinking, communication skills and understanding values. These studies include the humanities as well as the social and behavioral sciences that define and distinguish learning and teaching at a university level.

Degrees

Bachelor of Arts (BA), Bachelor of Science (BS) and Bachelor of Social Work (BSW) are conferred upon candidates who have successfully completed any of the particular programs designed for this degree.

Bachelor of Fine Arts (BFA) is conferred upon candidates who have successfully completed the requirements specified by the Theatre Department.

Advising

During the student's freshman and sophomore years, an advisor helps prepare the student for the selection of a major. Students deciding on a departmental major are assigned an advisor by the department.

Those students desiring an interdepartmental major prepare their program under the guidance of an advisor. When this program is approved by the advisor, a copy must be submitted to the associate dean of the College for approval.

Transfer students will receive an evaluation of transfer credits from the College upon admission. After initial advising in the College office, new transfer students will be assigned an advisor in the department of the selected major program. Transfer students are expected to earn at least 15 hours in the major program at the University of Detroit Mercy unless otherwise specified by the department.

University Core Curriculum

All students who enter University of Detroit Mercy are required to complete the University Core Curriculum. The core curriculum consists of courses designed to meet objectives which ensure that students, in addition to pre-professional preparation, receive a liberal education of skills and content consistent with the Mercy and Jesuit traditions. See page 89 for more information on the University Core Curriculum.

Cooperative Education

Co-op is available for students in Liberal Arts & Education. See Cooperative Education on page 92 for more information.

Academic Exploration Program

The Academic Exploration Program is designed to assist students who have not yet decided on a specific academic major and are exploring multiple program options. It provides the time and opportunity for students to explore their interests and test their aptitudes. It supports this exploration through academic advisors who are trained to assist students in making thoughtful academic decisions.

A large percentage of college students are undecided at some level. This conclusion is supported by national research and experience at University of Detroit Mercy. Between 55 and 65 percent of all college students change their majors at least once before the end of the sophomore year.

There are different levels and types of exploration. While some students enter college with no idea of the area in which they want to major, others are exploratory because they have interests and aptitudes in two or more academic areas. Still others have academic and career interests which have not been tested through their earlier academic experiences. These students need time to explore a variety of disciplines and trained advisors to help them make this exploration productive.

To support student explorations, the program offers two courses: AEP 100 — Academic Exploration and AEP 200 — Academic Alternatives. AEP 100 is designed for first semester freshmen. AEP 200 serves new transfer students and nonfreshmen who are undecided or in the process of changing majors. Through these courses students examine the academic programs available at UDM and they receive training in goal setting, decision-making, and academic planning. AEP advisors then assist students in scheduling courses term-by-term in order to keep selected program options open.

Participation in the Academic Exploration Program and its courses is voluntary. Students who are interested in the program should contact a UDM admissions counselor.

 

Addiction Studies

Office: Reno Hall, McNichols Campus
Faculty: N. Calley; J. Franklin; G. Wehmer
Telephone: (313) 993-6306
E-mail: frankljt@udmercy.edu

The Addiction Studies program educates students in the knowledge and skills required to provide prevention, assessment, referral and treatment services for individuals and families who suffer from addictive disorders. The curriculum places major emphasis on chemical addictions while exploring the broader range of addictive behaviors. The interplay of mental illness and addiction is a focus as well. The program is interdisciplinary, including courses in the behavioral and physical sciences, the humanities as well as addiction studies. The practical experience of the internship is an important part of the curriculum.

Students can conveniently pursue the Bachelor of Science or the Undergraduate Certificate on a part-time or a fulltime basis. Transfer credit will shorten the program. Courses are scheduled evenings and weekends to accommodate the working student.

The B.S. curriculum satisfies the prerequisites for the M.A. in Addictions Counseling or Agency Counseling and for the M.A. in Clinical Psychology at UDM. Both the B.S. and the Undergraduate Certificate meet the education and internship requirements for the Certified Addictions Counselor credential (CAC) awarded by the State of Michigan.

Program Requirements

Bachelor of Science 52 cr.

ADS 100 Introduction to Substance Abuse3 cr.

ADS 120 Assessment, Referral, and Treatment Methods 3cr.

ADS 241 Techniques of Individual Counseling 3 cr.

ADS 436 Family Theory and Therapy 3 cr.

ADS 443 Group Methods 3 cr.

ADS 444 Advanced Internship 3 cr.

ADS 495 Addictive Populations3 cr.

BIO 108 The Science of Life 3 cr.

PYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 250 Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 342 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 360-1 Social Psychology plus Lab 4 cr.

STA 225 Statistics 3 cr.

Three of the following: 9 cr.

ADS 417 Chemical Dependence and Youth

ADS 421 Gambling and Sexual Addiction

ADS 447 Employee Assistance Programming

ADS 450 Prevention and Intervention in Substance Abuse

ADS 460 Spirituality and Recovery

One of the following: 3 cr.

SW 200 Introduction to Social Work

CJS 130 Introduction to Criminal Justice

Program Recommendation

For students planning to do graduate work in psychology two additional courses are recommended: PYC 341 Personality Theory (3 cr.) and PYC 402 Physiological Psychology (4 cr.)

Internship Sites

Over 30 substance abuse prevention, referral, and treatment agencies throughout Southeast Michigan and Southern Ontario are affiliated with the University for field placements in Addiction Studies.

Continued Matriculation/ Graduation Requirements

A. A grade of "C" must be earned in all courses required for the major. An overall GPA of 2.0 must be maintained.

B. Students recovering from addiction who experience a failure in abstinence while in the program will be expected to demonstrate two years sobriety once again in order to continue matriculation and to graduate.

Undergraduate Certificate in Addiction Studies

This Certificate is intended for students who are pursuing an undergraduate degree in a professional discipline that would enable them to be effective in the prevention of, intervention into, or treatment of addictive disorders. Because of the education and professional training that the student brings to the program from his or her own major discipline, it is possible to provide a curriculum of course work and field experience in Addiction Studies totaling 18 credit hours that prepares the student to work effectively on behalf of those adversely affected by addictive disorders.

Addictions Counseling Certification

The State of Michigan sponsors the Certified Addictions Counselor credential (CAC). It is compulsory for most professionals counseling chemically dependent clients in this and many other states. The ADS Certificate program provides all the educational and practicum hours required for the CAC should the student choose a counseling profession and pursue this credential. Additional requirements (state examinations and clinical hours) are the responsibility of the graduate.

Admission Requirements

1. Admission to undergraduate studies at UDM.

2. Admission to a major, such as Psychology or Social Work, which would interface effectively with the Certificate. (Students without such a major may be asked to take support courses.)

3. Submission of program application accompanied by a statement of career goals.

4. Interview with the program director or a designated faculty member.

Curriculum

The curriculum has three components:

1. A core of four required courses totaling 12 credits:

   ADS 100 Introduction to Substance Abuse 3 cr.

   ADS 120 Assessment, Referral, and Treatment Methods 3 cr.

   ADS 241 Techniques of Individual Counseling 3 cr.

   ADS 436 Family Theory and Therapy 3 cr.

2. One elective course totaling 3 credits from the following:

   ADS 417 Chemical Dependence and Youth 3 cr.

   ADS 421 Gambling and Sexual Addiction 3 cr.

   ADS 443 Group Methods 3 cr.

   ADS 447 Employee Assistance Programming 3 cr.

   ADS 450 Prevention and Intervention in Substance Abuse 3 cr.

   ADS 460 Spirituality and Recovery 3 cr.

   ADS 495 Addictive Populations 3 cr.

3. A clinical component (ADS 242) totaling three credits to be fulfilled as a field placement of 300 hours in an addiction prevention or treatment agency. It can be done in conjunction with a clinical requirement in the student's major field.

Total: 18 cr.

The certificate will be awarded when the student has met all other requirements for the bachelor's degree.

The Arthur McGovern, S.J. Catholic Studies Certificate Program

The Arthur McGovern, S.J. Catholic Studies Certificate Program is guided by the principle that faith should inform life in the real world and awaken a responsibility to seek social justice. The Program requires the completion of 18 credit hours in courses from several disciplines that address six content areas:

• Traditions of Catholic Spirituality and Theology

• Christian Social Justice Traditions Diversity of Catholic Imagery

• Christian Perspectives on the Human Person and on Human Development

• Church History as It Informs Today's Church

• The Impact of the Second Vatican Council

Core Courses

CAS 100 Catholic Studies and the Self 1 cr.

CAS 200 Spirit and Methods 3 cr.

CAS 300 Catholic Church History: Crystallizing Moments 3 cr.

CAS 400 Senior Seminar 2 cr.

Elective Courses

PHL 356 Peace and Social Justice 3 cr.

PHL/RS 432 Classical and Contemporary Catholicism 3 cr.

PYC 350 Religion and Psychology 3 cr.

RS 230 Roman Catholic Theology Since Vatican II 3 cr.

RS 357 Spiritual Autobiographies 3 cr.

CAS 495 Topics Seminar 3 cr.

Students are required to complete the nine-credit hour core and to select nine credit hours from approved elective courses. Students are encouraged to take CAS 400 as their last course in the program.

 

Criminal Justice Studies

Office: 135 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: R. Homant (chair); E. Barnes; D. Kennedy; M. Witkowski; L. Lewis
Telephone: (313) 578-0362
E-mail: homantr@udmercy.edu

Courses in criminal justice lead to a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice, which prepares one to work in a wide variety of careers, public and private, at various levels of responsibility. These careers include federal, state, and local policing; other regulatory agencies of various branches of government; various levels of private investigation and private security; and a variety of careers in corrections, including parole and probation as well as institutional corrections. Students planning on pursuing a law degree have often found criminal justice a relevant major.

Criminal Justice is an interdisciplinary area that draws much of its content from law, psychology, political science, and sociology. The goal of the criminal justice curriculum is to make students aware of the key issues, concepts, and theories involved in understanding the operation of the criminal justice system. With this knowledge, students are taught to analyze the practical issues and controversies of the field from a social justice perspective. Problem solving, the ability to make discriminating judgments, and the application of theory to practice are key skills that the program fosters.

Program

Students are required to complete course requirements in three general areas: (a) University core curriculum (approximately 45 cr.), (b) supportive courses and (c) major concentration.

University Core Curriculum

See page 93 for more information on the University Core Curriculum. Specifically, the student should follow the core for the College of Liberal Arts & Education.

Supportive Courses (15 cr)

To insure that they have a good background in the key areas on which criminal justice is based, students will take at least five courses in the social sciences: Sociology, Psychology, and Political Science. Up to two courses in Human Services, Social Work and Addiction Studies may also be counted toward this requirement. (Note: All courses below are three credit courses.)

The only specific supportive course that is required is: PYC 342, Abnormal Psychology.

The Introductory courses, namely Sociology 100, Psychology 100, and Political Science 100 are recommended, though higher level social science courses may be substituted with the advisor's approval.

Note that supportive courses may also meet University Core Curriculum requirements.

Criminal Justice: Major Required Courses

Required (36 cr.) (All courses are 3-credit courses.)

CJS 130 Introduction to Criminal Justice

CJS 131 Introduction to Corrections

CJS 395 Criminal Investigation

CJS 410 Criminal Law

CJS 415 Juvenile Justice

CJS 420 Evidence and Criminal Procedure

CJS 451 Criminology and Penology

CJS 454 Sociology of Deviant Behavior.

CJS 492 Senior Seminar: Theory and Research in Criminal Justice.

In addition to the above nine courses, the student must take three elective Criminal Justice courses (this may include courses with an SEC or HUS prefix, with advisor's approval).

Principal Criminal Justice Electives

SEC 401 Security Systems and Crime Prevention

CJS 250 Introduction to Police Administration

CJS 398 Technology and Criminal Justice

CJS 399 Narcotics and the Police

CJS 402 Court Structures and Functions

CJS 416 Gangs and Deviant Social Groups

CJS 450 Institutional Corrections

CJS 452 Organized Crime

CJS 456 Aggressive Behavior

CJS 458 Profiling and Threat Assessment

CJS 460 Community Corrections

CJS 480 Theory of Law Enforcement

CJS 481 Women, Crime and Justice

CJS 482 Terrorism

CJS 483 Family Violence: Spouse and Child Abuse

CJS 484 Psychology, Psychiatry, and the Law

CJS 485 Critical Issues in Criminal Justice

CJS 487 Victimology

CJS 488 SexCrimes

CJS 489 White Collar Crime

CJS 490 Internship in Criminal Justice Studies

CJS 495 Criminalistics

CJS 499 Violence in the Workplace

Field Experience

The Criminal Justice Studies major may obtain field experience in two programs:

1. Cooperative Education—planned paid experience in federal, state, and local law enforcement and correctional agencies as well as private security and campus police.

2. Internship—students have a 180 hour supervised experience under the direction of a faculty member. (See CJS 490.)

 

Communication Studies

Office: Briggs Building, McNichols Campus
Faculty: B. Bolz; G. Curtsinger; C. Dause; V. Dicks; G. Garrett; C. Langham;
Telephone: (313) 993-1698
E-mail: bolzbj@udmercy.edu

The Communication Studies curriculum develops student understanding of functions and effects of multiple communication media through exposure to ethics, theory, and research. Media technology skills are learned in the context of creation and critical evaluation of mediated messages.

The CST major is required to: (1) Complete a total of 36 credit hours in CST, excluding CST 101, and only 12 of which may be from independent studies (Transfer students must complete a minimum of 15 credit hours in CST at UDM); (2) Complete at least 15 of those 36 credit hours in courses at the 300/400 level; (3) Submit a portfolio in the senior year; (4) Include in the required 36 credit hours the following six courses:

• CST 112 Visual Communication

• CST 300 Media Ethics

• CST 499 Capstone Seminar

One course from each of the following three categories:

Research:

CST 201 Research Methods

CST 316 Rhetorical Criticism

CST 401 Public Opinion

CST 402 Audience Analysis

STA 225 Statistics

Theory:

CST 204 Interpersonal Communication

CST 209 Persuasion

CST 304 Small Group Communication

CST 305 Theories of Listening Behavior

CST 307 Organizational Communication

CST 317 Argumentation

Writing:

CST 203 News Writing

CST 221 News Editing

CST 223 Electronic Media Writing

CST 340 Public Relations Writing

 

Economics

Office: 116 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: D. Byrne; J. Mosby; T. Schad; R. Shen, S.J.; Y. Song
Telephone: (313) 993-1238

The major in Economics prepares students for careers in business, government and law as well as providing a solid foundation for further graduate studies. The Economics major requires 33 credit hours. Half of the major's courses comprise of required courses (ECN 295, 296, 305, 315, and 316). The remainder half is composed of electives in Economics. Among the elective courses are: money and capital markets, international trade and finance, economic history, economic development, resource economics,comparative economic systems, labor economics, government finance and others. Economics majors are also required to take a course in applied statistics.

Graduates have been placed in banking, teaching, manufacturing firms and government agencies, to name a few. Many have gone on in graduate studies earning law degrees and advanced degrees in economics.

Economics Major 33 cr.

STA 225 Statistics 3 cr.

ECN 295 Microeconomic Principles 3 cr.

ECN 296 Macroeconomic Principles 3 cr.

ECN 305 Money and the Financial System 3 cr.

ECN 315 Intermediate Microeconomics3 cr.

ECN 316 Intermediate Macroeconomics3 cr.

Electives 15 cr.

 

English

Office: 219 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: M. Barry; C. Crabtree; T. Dugdale; J. Freeman; C. Gilliard; C. Hirst; J. Isbey; M. O'Gorman; J. Rice; N. Rombes; R. Weatherston
Telephone: (313) 993-1080
E-mail: freemajc@udmercy.edu

Students in the English program read, critique, and write about the best novels, short stories, plays, poetry, hypertexts, and films ever created. Over the course of their studies, English majors also develop their critical thinking and problem-solving skills, technological savvy, artistic abilities, historical and cultural awareness, and a wide range of writing proficiencies. Many go on to graduate programs in literature, law, film, and cultural studies.

Our graduates also are in high demand in a variety of fields, including teaching; information sciences; creative, professional, and technical writing; editing and publishing; counseling; business; law; web-design; research; information management, and corporate consulting.

Requirements of the English Major: 36 cr.

All English majors develop a foundational knowledge of literary genres, periods, and critical approaches. Within the major, they choose between four areas of specialization:

1. Literature Track

2. Creative Writing Track

3. Professional Writing Track

4. Media Studies Track

One of the following for all English majors: 3 cr.

ENL 235 The Study of Fiction

ENL 245 The Study of Poetry

ENL 265 The Study of Drama

ENL 280 Introduction to Media Studies

Six of the following for all English majors: 18 cr.

ENL 311 American Literature to 1865

ENL 312 American Literature 1865 to 1920

ENL 320 Medieval Literature

ENL 321 Renaissance Literature

ENL 322 English literature of the 18th Century

ENL 323 English literature of the 19th Century

ENL 334 Transatlantic Modernisms

ENL 335 Post-1945 Literature

15 credits of special interest study meeting the requirements of one of the following four tracks:

Literature Track

One of the following: 3 cr.

ENL 236 Diverse Voices in Fiction

ENL 285 African American Literature

ENL 295 The Study of Folklore

ENL 390 Children's Literature

One of the following: 3 cr.

ENL 326 History of the English Language

ENL 409 Modern American English

ENL 480 Literary Criticism

Three of the following: 9 cr.

ENL 460 Topics in Literary History

ENL 461 Topics in Literature and Science

ENL 462 Topics in Genre

ENL 463 Topics in Authorial Studies

ENL 464 Topics in Race

ENL 465 Topics In Gender

ENL 466 Topics in Class

ENL 467 Topics In Cultural Studies

ENL 468 Topics In World Literature

ENL 469 Topics in Religion

Creative Writing Track

Acceptance into the Creative Writing Track is by portfolio submission. Students who have taken ENL 205 and at least one literature class may submit a track portfolio to the Creative Writing Committee. Portfolios are evaluated once a semester. Students not accepted should take classes fulfilling the Literature Track requirements, and may re-apply. It is recommended that students who wish to be admitted to the Creative Writing Track take ENL 245: Introduction to Poetry as their gateway course.

ENL 205 Introduction to Creative Writing 3 cr.

One of the following: 3 cr.

ENL 301 Writing of Fiction (Prerequisite ENL 205 or permission of Creative Writing Director)

ENL 302 Writing of Poetry (Prerequisite ENL 205 or permission of Creative Writing Director)

ENL 304 Writing of Screenplays

ENL 305 Freelance Writing for Print and Web

Two of the following: 6 cr.

(At least one course must be at the 400-level)

ENL 201 The Journal

ENL 301 Writing of Fiction

ENL 302 Writing of Poetry

ENL 304 Writing of Screenplays

ENL 305 Freelance Writing for Print and Web

ENL 401 Advanced Writing of Fiction (Prerequisite ENL 301)

ENL 402 Advanced Writing of Poetry (Prerequisite ENL 302)

ENL 405 Editorial Processes and Products

One of the following:

ENL 480 Literary Criticism

ENL 490 Senior Seminar (taught by a Creative Writing faculty member)

Professional Writing Track

ENL 202 Writing Across the Curriculum3 cr.

Two of the following: 6 cr.

ENL 204 Introduction to Business Writing

ENL 303 Technical Writing

ENL 305 Freelance Writing for Print and Web

ENL 306 Research and Research Writing

ENL 326 History of the English Language

Two of the following: 6 cr.

ENL 405 Editorial Processes and Products

ENL 409 Modern American English

ENL 491 Information Design Laboratory

Media Studies Track

ENL 280 Introduction to Media Studies 3 cr.

Two of the following: 6 cr.

ENL 255 Studies in Film

ENL 467 Topics In Cultural Studies

ENL 491 Information Design Laboratory

Two of the following: 6 cr.

ENL 305 Freelance Writing for Print and Web

ENL 375 Film Genres

ENL 376 The Art of the Film

ENL 405 Editorial Processes and Products

Majors may take as many additional electives in English as they wish, providing they satisfy other degree requirements and achieve an overall balance in their studies. Upon completion of their degree requirements, all English majors submit a graduation portfolio demonstrating substantive work and writing. Students should consult with their English advisors for details.

 

Electronic Critique

(Interdisciplinary Degree Program or Certificate)

Office: 245 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: Marcel O'Gorman (Director). This is an interdisciplinary program, so faculty will vary according to course selections.
Telephone: (313) 993-2009
E-Mail: ogormamm@udmercy.edu
Website: http://liberalarts.udmercy.edu/e-crit/

New Information Technologies (IT) have had a deep impact on our culture. The most successful citizens in an IT based society will need to have advanced critical skills and creative problem solving abilities that permit them to sift through an overwhelming flow of information. Electronic Critique (E-Crit) responds to this need with a unique, multidisciplinary degree program that stresses critical thinking about our ÒElectronic Culture.Ó E-Crit is designed for students who want to combine creativity, critical thinking, and technical expertise. Students who major in the program take a core of IT related courses (12 credits), a concentration in the Liberal Arts (18 credits), and select from tracks in PROGRAMMING or DESIGN (15 credits). All E-Crit majors share their specialized knowledge in the E-Crit Design Laboratory, where they undertake real-world, digital projects (12 credits). Majors must complete a Digital Media Portfolio (3 credits) in their final term to be eligible for graduation. All students engage in co-op and/or internship opportunities. The curriculum prepares students for careers in programming, design, advertising, marketing, business, teaching, media production, and journalism, among others; it also prepares them to be leaders in their fields and in their communities. A Certificate in Electronic Critique is available for non-E-Crit majors.

E-Crit majors must complete the following:

E-Crit Core (12 cr.)

All E-Crit Majors must complete the following four courses:

CIS 103 Web Productivity Tools 3 cr.

ENL 305 Freelance Writing: Print and Web 3 cr.

HIS 360 History of American Technology 3 cr.

PHL 140 Topics in Critical Thinking: Media 3 cr.

Disciplinary Concentration (18 cr.)

E-Crit is rooted in a traditional liberal arts education. Therefore, all majors must pursue a disciplinary concentration from a department in the College of Liberal Arts & Education. Each department will recommend courses suitable for E-Crit majors.

E-Crit Design Laboratory(12 cr.)

Students enroll in the E-Crit Lab four times.

ENL 491 E-Crit Design Laboratory 3 cr. x 4

Digital Media Portfolio (3 cr.)

ECR 499 Digital Media Portfolio 3 cr.

E-Crit Tracks (15 credits from one of the tracks below)

Students in E-Crit must select from one of two specialized tracks—Programming OR Design—in order to develop an area of expertise related to information technology. Recommended courses are listed below. Substitutions may be made with the approval of the program director. In keeping with the cross-disciplinary commitment of E-Crit, majors are encouraged to combine these tracks with certificate programs in other colleges (see below).

Programming Track (15 cr.)

CIS 201 Introduction to Programming (Prerequisite CIS 103)

CIS 220 Programming for the Internet (Prerequisite CIS 201)

CIS 281 Data Communications and Networks (Prerequisite CIS 201)

CIS 305 Requirements and Design (Prerequisite CIS 220)

Plus, choose one of the following:

CIS 335 Interface Design (P CIS 115 and 305), CIS 382 Database Design (P CIS 305), CIS 460 Technologies for E-Commerce (P CIS 281 and 305)

Design Track(15 cr.)

ART 111 Two-Dimensional Design (Marygrove College, 4cr.)

AR 116 Introduction to Computer Graphics (permission of Arch. prof. required)

OR

ART 211 & 221 Introduction to Computer Graphics (Marygrove College, 4 cr.)

AR 216 Computer Design (permission of Arch. prof. required)

OR

CST 231 Design and Layout

ENL 215 Multimedia I

Plus, choose one of the following:

AR 371 Graphic Design, ENL 315 Multimedia II (P ENL 215), ENL 375 Film Genres, CST 311 Single Camera Video Production

Students in this track must complete at least one design-related elective at the 300-400 level.

Certificate in Electronic Critique (for all other majors, 30 cr.)

This is a special certification program available to non-E-Crit majors. Students in this program must successfully complete the courses below, and assemble a Digital Media Portfolio (ECR 499) in their final term of study. Successful completion of the E-Crit Certificate demonstrates to employers, prospective graduate schools, etc. that the student possesses advanced technological proficiency and critical thinking skills.

CIS 103 Web Productivity Tools 3 cr.

PHL 140 Topics in Crit. Thinking: Media3 cr.

CST/ENL 215 Multimedia I3 cr.

CST/ENL 315 Multimmedia II3 cr.

ENL 305 Freelance Writing: Print and Web3 cr.

HIS 336 History of American Technology3 cr.

ENL 375Film Genres3 cr.

ENL 491E-Crit Design Laboratory6 cr.

(2 x 3 cr.)

ECR 499 Digital Media Portfolio3 cr.

Other Certificate Programs

Electronic Critique provides students with the opportunity to engage in a unique, cross-disciplinary program of study. Students enrolled in the program may maximize this opportunity by combining a degree in E-Crit with certificate programs in other departments (e.g., Business Administration Certificate). This is best accomplished by a careful selection of electives and core curriculum courses.

 

Teacher Education

Office: Reno Hall, McNichols Campus
Faculty: J. Gambini; N. Gibney; J. Letscher (Interim Chair); I. McKinnon; J. Morris; L. Williams
E-mail: letschjl@udmercy.edu

Teacher Education with State of Michigan certification is available in four areas: Elementary Education, Waldorf Education, Secondary Education and Special Education.

The Teacher Education programs of the College of Liberal Arts & Education prepare effective and responsible professional teachers who have a commitment to the implementation of the Education Department's Code of Professional Ethics. This professional teacher will have an impact on school reform, the community and society in the 21st century. Education faculty help students become ethical, caring, value-directed persons who possess a commitment to urban society and social justice. Students also gain competency in the art and science of teaching from a research knowledge base and continue to be inquiring-reflective educators. The cosmopolitan nature of our metropolitan area (multi-cultural, multi-talented, handicapped as well as gifted) provides a perfect laboratory for the education of the professional teacher.

Teacher Certification Program Requirements*

*Teacher certification requirements listed are subject to changes mandated by the Michigan State Board of Education.

The process for pursuing teacher certification has several steps. An application and a departmental action are required at each of the steps listed below. Additionally, all education students are required to pass the three sections (reading, writing, and mathematics) of the State-required Michigan Basic Skills Test (MBST) within the first two semesters of enrollment in teacher education courses. Students will not be permitted to register for further coursework until all sections of the MBST are passed.

1. Entry into Teacher Education. Students who wish to begin taking teacher education courses must schedule an appointment with the assistant dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Education, who will assist the student with a plan of work toward the desired level of certification.

Students can begin taking education courses at this stage. These include EDU 401 or 402, EDU 420, EDU 432, EDU 440, EDU 459, SED 460. EDU 401/402 and EDU 432 must be taken in the first two semesters of enrollment. (See following pages for course prerequisites.) Education methods courses cannot be taken at this stage.

Students must present passing scores for the reading, writing, and mathematics sections of the Michigan Basic Skills Test (MBST) prior to teacher education coursework beyond EDU 401/402.

2. Entry into the Teacher Certification Program. Upon completion of the MBST requirement and at least 12 credit hours in the major and minor, students are eligible for entry into the Teacher Certification Program. Application must be made to enter the Teacher Certification Program. The application package can be obtained from the Education Department offices, and must be completed and returned to an Education office. Requirements for entry into a teacher education program are listed in the current Teacher Certification Handbook.

Upon acceptance into the Teacher Certification Program, students must complete all remaining education courses, including the methods courses. For elementary certification these include EDU 441, 442, 443, 448, and 449. For Secondary certification these courses are: EDU 469, 478, and one 470s (content area methods course in certification major).

Students must also pass the state-required Michigan Test for Teacher Certification content area tests in the major and minor fields of certification before admission to student teaching.

3. Student Teaching. The student must apply to enter student teaching. To qualify, students must have completed all Education coursework. Application must be made by February 1 for the following fall semester (Term I) and by October 1 for the following winter semester (Term II). The application package listing all requirements can be obtained when the student makes an appointment with the coordinator of Student Teaching Placements (dooleymm@udmercy.edu).

4. Recommendation for Certification. Students apply for certification in the final semester. Students cannot be recommended for certification to the State of Michigan until all degree requirements and certification requirements have been completed, including the passing of the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) content area tests in the candidate's major and minor.

Programs

The College of Liberal Arts & Education offers programs which lead to a Bachelor of Arts degree with elementary certification. The College also offers a Bachelor of Arts degree with secondary education certification for selected majors: social studies and science. The Bachelor of Science in Education is offered in the teacher certification program in Special Education.

Students who wish to complete the requirements for a Secondary Education Teaching Certificate do so in conjunction with a liberal arts degree program in the College of Liberal Arts & Education or a science degree program in the College of Engineering & Science.

They pursue the degree program in their respective colleges and are recommended for a teaching certificate by the Department of Education when the certification requirements are completed.

The College of Liberal Arts & Education also offers a teacher certification program for individuals who possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university. The program may be pursued on a part-time, late afternoon or evening basis with the exception of the student teaching requirement which is a 15-week semester of full-day attendance. Students in the post-degree program must satisfy all teacher certification program requirements.

Elementary Education

Students preparing to teach in the elementary school pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree with a teaching major and a teaching minor in an academic subject area in addition to the University Core Curriculum requirements and the professional education sequence of courses. The department reserves the right to require specific courses in the major or minor

Teaching Majors and Minors

A teaching major consists of not less than 30 semester hours in a single discipline or 36 semester hours in a group of disciplines. A teaching minor consists of not less than 20 semester hours in a single discipline and 24 semester hours in a group of disciplines. Teaching majors and teaching minors must be appropriate to the elementary school. Students should consult their Education advisor regarding courses for the teaching major and the teaching minor as well as other program requirements. The department reserves the right to require specific courses in the major and minor.

The following teaching majors and minors are approved by the State Board of Education for Elementary Certification:

English, Speech, Language Arts, Economics*, History, Political Science*, Social Studies, Biology, Chemistry*, Physics*, General Science, Mathematics, Emotionally Impaired/ Behaviorally Disordered (major only), Learning Disabilities (major only), Early Childhood**, Health Education*

* Minor only

** Is an additional endorsement on an elementary certificate.

Teacher Certification Required Courses–Elementary

Note: Teacher education students are expected to have passed all of the Michigan Basic Skills tests (reading, mathematics, and writing) within the first two semesters of enrollment in teacher education.

EDU 401 Introduction to Elementary Education
(Must be completed within the first two semesters of enrollment in Teacher Education) 2 cr.

EDU 432 (with Lab) Psychology of Education
(Pre or co-requisite: EDU 401. Prerequisite for all methods courses: 441, 442, 443, 448, 449) 3 cr.

EDU 420 Philosophy of Education 3 cr.

EDU 440 School and Society 3 cr.

SED 460 Mainstreaming and Education of Exceptional Persons 3 cr.

EDU 459 Instructional Technology 3 cr.

EDU 441 Methods and Materials of Instruction for Social Studies in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 2 cr.

EDU 442 Methods and Materials of Instruction for Science in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite:EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program* ) 2 cr.

EDU 443 Teaching Reading in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 3 cr.

EDU 448 Methods and Materials of Instruction for Reading and Language Arts inElementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must beadmitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 3 cr.

EDU 449 Methods and Materials of Instruction for Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools (Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 2 cr.

EDU 459 Instructional Technology (Prerequisite: CIS 100 or equivalent course, or demonstration of skills) 3 cr.

EDU 489 Directed teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools 8 cr.

All Education coursework must be completed before doing student teaching.

* See current Teacher Certification Handbook for requirements.

 

Waldorf Elementary Teacher Education Program

E-mail: willialg@udmercy.edu

The Waldorf Education Teacher Certification Program was inaugurated between the Waldorf Institute and Mercy College of Detroit in 1966. Subsequent to the consolidation which created the University of Detroit Mercy, the Waldorf Teacher Education Program was re-approved by the Michigan Board of Education in 1993.

The College of Liberal Arts & Education offers a joint program of study leading toward a Bachelor of Arts degree with Michigan Elementary Teacher Certification in Waldorf Education as well as a post degree program for graduates with a certifiable major and minor.

Waldorf Education is based on the conviction that education must engage and nourish the whole child in body, mind and spirit. To that end, the course of study (in addition to the courses in Waldorf methods) includes a concentration on artistic activities and an introduction to Rudolf Steiner's philosophical perspective known as anthroposophy.

The Bachelor of Arts degree with Michigan Elementary Teacher Certification can be earned by completing two years of full-time study with the Waldorf Teacher Development Association and a concurrent or additional year of full-time study at the University of Detroit Mercy. Another year may be required to complete all Michigan teacher certification requirements.

In conjunction with the Waldorf Teacher Education Program, Michigan teacher certification at the elementary level is available to post degree students (with a certifiable major/minor).

Admission Criteria/Procedures

Application for admission may be obtained through an interview at the College of Liberal Arts & Education with Linda Williams, Waldorf Program Director,(313) 993-6323 or (313) 823-8764.

Requirements

The following courses constitute the Waldorf Teacher Education Program:

EDU 335 Child Development and Learning 3 cr.

EDU 327 Waldorf Curriculum Development 2 cr.

EDU 303 Cultural History for Waldorf Education 4 cr.

EDU 302 Fundamentals of Human Development 2 cr.

EDU 440 School and Society 3 cr.

EDU 459 Instructional Technology 3 cr.

SED 460 Education and Mainstreaming of Exceptional Persons 3 cr.

EDU 443 Teaching Reading in the Elementary and Middle Schools 3 cr.

EDU 329 Waldorf Methods of Teaching Language Arts 3 cr.

EDU 325 Waldorf Methods of Teaching Science 2 cr.

EDU 326 Waldorf Methods of Teaching Social Studies 2 cr.

EDU 322 Waldorf Methods of Teaching Mathematics 2 cr.

EDU 301 Humanity and Nature: The Study of Man 3 cr.

EDU 484 Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools I  4 cr.

EDU 458 Student Teaching in a Waldorf School4 cr.

Secondary Education

Students preparing to teach in secondary schools may complete the requirements for a teaching certificate in connection with their degree programs in the College of Liberal Arts & Education or the College of Engineering & Science. The requirements for a secondary school teaching certificate include completion of a teaching major and teaching minor in an academic subject area appropriate to the secondary school and the professional education sequence. In most instances, the degree major constitutes the teaching major.

Students in the secondary teacher education program are assigned an Education advisor in the Education Department upon admission to the teacher certification program to plan the completion of the teaching major, the teaching minor and the education sequence of courses.

Teaching Majors and Minors

A teaching major consists of not less than 30 semester hours in a single discipline or 36 semester hours in a group of disciplines. A teaching minor consists of not less than 20 semester hours in a single discipline or not less than 24 semester hours in a group of disciplines. The department reserves the right to require specific courses in the major and minor.

The following teaching majors and minors are approved by the State Board of Education for Secondary Certification: English, Communications (Speech), Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology*, Sociology*, Social Studies, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, General Science, Mathematics, Business Education*, Computer Science, Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered (major only), Learning Disabled (major only), Health Education*

* Minor only

Teacher Certification Required Courses–Secondary

Note: Teacher education students are expected to have passed all of the Michigan Basic Skills tests (reading, mathematics and writing) within the first two semesters of enrollment in teacher education.

Students planning to become certified to teach in secondary schools must complete 34 semester credit hours in the following sequence of Education courses.

EDU 402 Introduction to Secondary Education
(Must be completed within the first two semesters of enrollment in a Teacher Education Program) 2 cr.

EDU 432 Psychology of Education (with Lab)
(Pre or co-requisite: EDU 402. Prerequisite for all methods courses: 478, 469, 471, 473, 474) 3 cr.

EDU 420 Psychology of Education 3 cr.

EDU 440 School and Society 3 cr.

SED 460 Mainstreaming and Education of Exceptional Persons 3 cr.

EDU 459 Instructional Technology
(Prerequisite: CIS 100 or equivalent course, or demonstration of skills) 3 cr.

EDU 478 Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 2 cr.

EDU 469 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools I
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. This course is a prerequisite for EDU 471, 473, 474, 475. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 2 cr.

One of the following:

EDU 471 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Mathematics
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 3 cr.

EDU 473 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Social Studies
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 3 cr.

EDU 474 Curriculum and Methods of Teachingin Secondary Schools II: Communication Arts
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 3 cr.

EDU 475 Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Science
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*) 3 cr.

AND

EDU 490 Directed Teaching in the Secondary Schools (All Education coursework must be completed before doing student teaching) 8 cr.

* See current Teacher Certification Handbook for requirements

Post Degree Certification

Post-degree students may prepare for an elementary or secondary teaching certificate in the College of Liberal Arts & Education. The requirements are the same as for elementary education and secondary education. See above.

In addition, students pursuing elementary education are required to fulfill the following general studies requirements:

English Writing 3 cr.

Speech 3 cr.

Literature 3 cr.

Computer Science 3 cr.

Math for Elementary Teachers 6 cr.

General Science 6 cr.

Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

Multicultural Understanding 3 cr.

Humanities 6 cr.

Social Studies  6 cr.

Social Responsibility 6 cr.

Humanities: Art, Music, or Drama 3 cr.

Students pursuing secondary education are required to have fulfilled the following general studies requirements:

English Writing 3 cr.

Speech 3 cr.

Computer Science 3 cr.

Intermediate Algebra 3 cr.

Science 3 cr.

Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

Multicultural Understanding 3 cr.

Humanities 9 cr.

Social Science9 cr.

Social Responsibility 6 cr.

 

History

Office: 322 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: E. DeWindt; R. Finkenbine(Chair); D. Muhammad; D. Robinson-Dunn; J. Staudenmaier, S.J.; S. Stever; G. Sumner
Telephone: (313) 993-1016
E-mail: finkenre@udmercy.edu

The goals of the History Department are: (1) to provide students in all colleges and programs opportunities to develop a deeper understanding of the contemporary world through a critical knowledge of the past; (2) to provide all students with opportunities to cultivate skills of analyzing, synthesizing, evaluating, and interpreting historical evidence. Thus, the program is designed to play an integral role in the general liberal arts education of UDM students and to serve the needs of history majors on a variety of career paths.

History Major 36 cr.

The major consists of a minimum of 36 hours of approved course work, with an overall C average in the course work.

The 36 hours must include:

HIS 150 Introduction to History 3 cr. or HIS 160 Comparative Civilizations

HIS 250 U.S. to 1877 3 cr.

HIS 251 U.S. since 1877 3 cr.

HIS 291 Historical Methods 3 cr.

Two of the following: 6 cr.

HIS 200 Ancient Mediterranean World

HIS 210 Europe in the Middle Ages and Renaissance

HIS 220 Early Modern Europe

HIS 230 Europe in the 19th and 20th Centuries

Two of the following:6 cr.

HIS 240 Modern Middle East

HIS 270 Modern China and Japan

HIS 280 Latin American History

HIS 290 African History

Electives 300/400-level 12 cr.

( 3 cr. of which must be the Senior Seminar—HIS 499— or another designated research seminar at the 400 level)

Concentrations

History majors may plan their degree programs to concentrate in any one of four tracks:

Public History

Public history may be broadly defined as using the past to serve the present. It is appropriate for history majors who are considering career options other than teaching or law. Such options include: archivist, museum curator or administrator, manager of historic properties, editing and publishing, policy analysis, government service, urban and regional planning, etc.

Teaching (Elementary/Secondary)

See requirements in the Education program.

Pre-law

See pre-law advisor for recommended program.

Graduate Study

For students interested in pursuing graduate studies in History, the emphasis in their undergraduate studies will depend on their specific interests—e.g. modern Europe, recent America. Students should use electives to build a strong cognate in a complementary area: e.g. languages, English, philosophy, economics, religious studies, political science.

Those considering an advanced degree in History should consult their advisor for help selecting coursework and applying to graduate schools.

 

Human Services

Office: 135 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: R. Homant (chair); D. Kennedy; M. Witkowski; E. Barnes; L. Lewis
Telephone: (313) 578-0362
E-mail: homantr@udmercy.edu

Projected to be one of the fastest growing job fields in the first decade of the next century, Human Services is a family of careers designed for those who want to work with people. Whether one's goal is to try to make the world a better place, or—more modestly—simply to help a few people cope better with life, Human Services equips students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to function in a professional capacity.

Course work in Human Services leads to a Bachelor of Science degree that prepares one for a wide variety of positions in both public and private service agencies, as well as some areas of private enterprise. Human Services professionals work with a wide variety of individuals, including: the unemployed, the unskilled, the physically and emotionally handicapped, convicted offenders, substance abusers, troubled youth, the elderly and the physically ill. They work with individuals, families, and neighborhood groups in community mental health centers, hospitals, hospices, correctional facilities, and other state agencies, as well as in human resources and training and development in private industry.

Human Services is an interdisciplinary field with many diverse opportunities and challenges. The Human Services student takes a basic set of eight core courses that are supported by an individualized program tailored to the student's needs.

Flexibility makes the Human Services program attractive to a broad range of students: service-oriented, traditional undergraduates; community college graduates who have already completed a program in a human services specialty area; those currently employed who wish to enhance their advancement potential; and students whose goal is post-degree work in counseling or a related area.

Requirements

Students are required to complete course requirements in three general areas:

(a) University Core Curriculum (approximately 45 cr.),

(b) major and

(c) minor concentration.

Note: all courses below are three credits, unless otherwise noted.

a.) University Core Requirements

See page 93 for more information on the University Core Curriculum.

b.) Major Requirements (24 cr. of HUS & 15 cr. of specialization)

HUS (24 cr.)

HUS 150 Introduction to Human Services

HUS 342 Human Services Leadership

HUS 422 Ethics and Values in Human Services

HUS 437 Counseling Process in Human Services

HUS 441 Multicultural Understanding

HUS 491 Internship in Human Services

HUS 495 Human Resources Development

HUS 499 Integrating Seminar in Human Services

Note: with the permission of their academic advisor and the department chair, students who demonstrate sufficient background in one of the above courses may substitute an alternate HUS course; see the list of Human Services courses for possibilities.

Human Services Specialization: (15 cr.)

Normally consists of five courses in a human services area. Some suggested areas include: addiction studies, criminal justice, corrections, education, legal assistance, psychology, sociology, and social work. While it is usually preferable that all five sources come from the same content area (e.g. all CJS courses), some areas of specialization, such as Òfamily studies' are cross disciplinary.

Concentration

The minor concentration is a second area of specialization. Normally a minor involves six to eight courses in an area. The minor is not required to be related to the student's Human Services specialization. It may be in a traditional academic subject area (e.g., History, English, Business, etc.) or it may be a blend of related courses across disciplines, either within or outside of the human services field. Students intending to work in a business setting are encouraged to use the Business Certificate (see page 18) for their area of concentration. The minor is intended as a flexible requirement that will enhance the student's credentials. Students are encouraged to consult their advisors about various possibilities.

 

Liberal Studies

Office: 131 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Advising Coordinator: Kathleen Bush
Telephone: (313) 993-3254
E-mail: bushkt@udmercy.edu

This interdisciplinary major is designed for students who have broad interests cutting across the boundaries of the traditional disciplines. The goal is to provide a systematic program of studies, tailored to the student's background, interests, and goals, which integrates the content and methods of the liberal disciplines and provides a solid grounding in one of those disciplines.

Liberal Studies Major 42 cr.

Departmental Concentration 21 cr.

Electives 21 cr.

Concentrations

In the Liberal Studies major, the student will develop, under the guidance of an advisor, a plan of study which integrates his/her interests and goals. The plan of study will be focused in one of two areas of concentration:

Humanities

Course work will be primarily in the disciplines of literature, history, philosophy, religious studies, languages, and the arts.

Social/Public Policy

Course work will be primarily in the policy sciences: political science, economics, and sociology, with supporting courses from communication studies, psychology, history, philosophy, and religious studies.

 

Philosophy

Office: Briggs 342
Faculty: M. Henninger, S.J., D. Jarnevic, D. Koukal, M. Leever, E. Oljar (Chair), G. Presbey
Phone: (313) 993-3388
E-mail: oljarea@udmercy.edu

As one of the oldest liberal arts disciplines (and also the original source of many of them), philosophy provides students with one of the best ways to acquire and hone the classic skills of the liberal arts: critical reading, critical writing, and critical thinking. The ability to read and analyze a philosophical text, to distinguish different positions on a single topic, and to analyze and construct careful arguments are among the central intellectual skills that the discipline seeks to cultivate. Philosophy develops these skills by requiring students to reflect on the most fundamental questions about reality, knowledge, morality, and all other aspects of the human experience.

The Department of Philosophy implements the University's commitment to students from a philosophical perspective. We do this by creating an academic environment that encourages students to approach fundamental questions with an attitude of open and disciplined reflection, that evokes a love for the intellectual life, and promotes a deeper appreciation of our civilization, which has been influenced by philosophy at all levels.

Philosophy Major 30 cr.

PHL 100 Introduction to Philosophy 3 cr.

PHL 201 Ethics 3 cr.

One of the following courses in logic: 3 cr.

PHL 150 Introduction to Logic

or

PHL 250 Symbolic Logic

Three of the following courses in the history of philosophy: 9 cr.

PHL 306 Greek Philosophy

PHL 307 Medieval Philosophy    

PHL 308 Modern Philosophy

PHL 441 Contemporary Philosophy

One of the following courses in the major areas of philosophy: 3 cr.

PHL 406 Metaphysics

PHL 407 Epistemology

3 elective courses in philosophy 9 cr.

PHL 100 is a prerequisite for all other philosophy courses except for PHL 140 and 150, which may be taken without prior coursework in philosophy. Students planning to do graduate study in philosophy are strongly urged to take more courses than the required 30 hours. The philosophy faculty will work with students to select additional courses that will help prepare them for graduate work in the discipline.

 

Political Science

Office: Briggs 243, McNichols Campus
Faculty: V. Mantzopoulos(Chair); D. Burkholder; S. Manning; R. Berg
Phone: (313) 993-1056
E-mail: armstrov@udmercy.edu

Political Science Major 33 cr.

The political science major is a flexible one, consisting of 33 credit hours with at least a 2.0 GPA It is organized around the various subfields of political science but also allows substantial concentration in an area of interest to the student. It culminates in an integrating seminar.

Students interested in pursuing a legal career will find the political science major emphasizes the development of skills, such as critical thinking and writing, necessary for entering and completing law school. Students may also consider completing the Legal Studies Certificate or the Business Certificate to supplement their interest in law.

The courses required for the major are:

POL 100 Introduction to Political Science 3 cr.

POL 210 American Politics 3 cr.

POL 260 Comparative Politics 3 cr.

or

POL 451 International Relations

POL 380 Elements of Political Thought 3 cr.

(or other approved theory course)

POL 499 Senior Seminar 3 cr.

STA 225 Statistics 3 cr.

Political Science Electives 15 cr.

Total 33 cr.

The 15 elective credits required to complete the major may be organized into areas of concentration or may be selected from all areas. The suggested areas of concentration are:

Concentrations

Judicial Studies and Law

POL 201 Introduction to Law and the Judiciary

POL 202 Criminal Law and Procedure

POL 203 Topics in Legal Issues

POL 204 Tort Law

POL 342 American Constitution & Public Law

POL 346 Civil Liberties and Equality

POL 454 International Law

American Studies and Theory

POL 205 Political Fiction

POL 210 American Politics

POL 235 Women and Politics

POL 322 Public Policy Analysis

POL 330 Government and the Economy

POL 339 Issues in Public Policy

POL 342 Constitutional and Public Law

POL 346 Civil Liberties and Equality

POL 386 Politics and the Media

International and Comparative Politics

POL 325 Comparative Administrative Systems

POL 452 Foreign Policy of the United States

POL 453 Japanese Politics

POL 454 International Law

POL 457 International Political Economy

POL 460 European Politics

POL 461 Russian Politics

POL 463 Third World Politics

POL 466 Chinese Politics

POL 467 Politics in Africa

Public Administration

POL 320 Public Administration

POL 323 Personnel Management & Labor Relations

POL 324 Government Budgeting

POL 325 Comparative Administrative Systems

POL 330 Government and the Economy

POL 339 Issues in Public Policy

POL 342 American Constitution & Public Law

POL 347 Administrative Law

Other electives, workshops, internships, and independent studies are listed in the "Courses" section of this catalog.

Legal Administration

The Legal Administration major, which leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree, is designed to assist individuals in acquiring the skills necessary to manage the complex mixture of personnel, technology and business that is the modern law office.

A Legal Administration major must complete a 36 credit hour core. Students may select 12 credit hours of electives from such areas as management, accounting, computer and information systems, criminal justice or psychology. Students may also select a three or six credit hour internship in a private or corporate law firm, government or judicial office, or public service organization or placement in one of our practicum sites. The internship program director will assist students with placement.

Independent study or directed research is also available for up to six credit hours. All topics must be approved by the program director at the time of registration.

Baccalaureate Degree

LA 110 Introduction to Law 3 cr.

LA 280 Legal Research I 3 cr.

LAD 312 Law Practice Management 3 cr.

LAD 340 Labor Relations 3 cr.

LAD 346 Human Resource Management 3 cr.

LAD 351 Legal Accounting 3 cr.

LAD 411 Legal Computer Applications 3 cr.

LAD 430 Leadership Skills 3 cr.

HUS 440 Multicultural Understanding 3 cr.

LAD 450 Marketing the Law Firm 3 cr.

LAD 460 Legal Ethics 3 cr.

LAD 465 Personal Finance 3 cr.

A grade of "C" must be maintained in all courses required for the major. A GPA of 2.0 must also be maintained Students must also complete the University Core Curriculum requirements.

Certificate Program

A Legal Assistant Certificate program is offered for students who have already obtained a bachelor's degree from an accredited college or university. This is a non-degree program. The certificate program requires completion of 33 credit hours in the Legal Assistant/Administration curriculum. The required courses are as follows:

Professional Sequence

LA 110 Introduction to Law 3 cr.

LA 130 Litigation I 3 cr.

LA 131 Litigation II 3 cr.

LA 280 Legal Research I 3 cr.

LA 281 Legal Research II 3 cr.

LAD 312 Law Practice Management 3 cr.

LAD 411 Legal Computer Application3 cr.

Any four additional legal specialty courses 12 cr.

Required supporting course: CIS 100

A grade of "C" must be maintained in all required Legal Assistant Certificate and supportive courses. A 2.0 GPA must also be maintained.

 

Pre-Law Program

Pre-Law Committee:
Dr. Vivian Dicks (313) 993-3286
Dr. Victoria Mantzopoulos (313) 993-1056
Dr. Elizabeth Oljar (313) 993-3388
Dr. Gregory Sumner (313) 993-1121
Dr. James Tubbs (313) 993-6156

The Pre-Law program is an academic advising program run by the Pre-Law Committee and the associate dean of the College of Liberal Arts & Education. Students who are planning on attending law school will be assigned an academic advisor who can assist them in choosing both a major program and electives that will help prepare them for the academic requirements of law school. While the Pre-Law program is not a degree-granting program, the committee devised a certificate program for students interested in legal studies.

Requirements for the Certificate in Legal Studies (27 cr.)

LST 200 Introduction to Legal Studies (includes a legal research skills component)

POL 210 American Politics

At least one course from each of the following four component areas of the certificate program:

Skills for the Legal Profession

PHL 140 Critical Thinking in Law

PHL 150 Introduction to Logic

ENL 202 Writing Across the Curriculum

CST 317 Argumentation

CST 402 Audience Analysis

History and Content of the Law

HIS 250 and 251 U.S. To and Since 1877

HIS 330 History of England to 1485

HIS 407 English Common Law

HIS 466 American Constitution

POL 210 American Politics

POL 342 American Constitution and Public Law

POL 346 Civil Liberties and Equality

Theoretical Foundations of Law

PHL 240 Philosophical Issues in Law

PHL 301 Social and Political Philosophy

PHL 315 Philosophy of Law and Politics

POL 380 Political Thought

Law in Society

BUS 231 Business Law

BUS 319 Business and Society

CST 301 Communication Law

ECN 355 History of Economic Thought

ECN 358 Money and Capital Markets

ECN 435 Economic History of the U.S.

CJS 451 Criminology and Penology

ETH 359 Ethics and Public Policy

HIS 345 U.S. Since 1945

HUS 410 Law and the Citizen

PHL 4xx Philosophy of Retributive Justice

(new course)

RS 240 Social Ethics

TD 343 Ethics and Economic Theories

RS 348 Justice: Contemporary Issues and Theories

SOC 212 Black Americans and Social Institutions

SOC 335 Urban Issues and Problems

SOC 340 Ethnic and Race Relations

Each Semester, one or more LST courses will be designated as fulfilling a capstone seminar requirement. Students must take at least one course with this designation.

Students may take no more than 12 credit hours in any one department (e.g. CST, HIS, PHL, POL).

At least 12 credit hours must be taken at the 300- or 400-level.

Students must complete 10 hours of community service.

The Pre-Law Committee emphasizes that there is no required undergraduate major for law school; rather, students should choose an academically rigorous major that is both of interest to them, and develops their skills in critical reading, writing, and thinking. Students who plan to attend law school are advised by the Association of American Law Schools to develop basic skills and insights rather than follow any pre-set pre-law program. Law schools urge an undergraduate education that emphasizes:

1. Reading comprehension skills. Reading both case law and statutes requires the ability to distinguish and understand the component parts of complex claims and definitions.

2. Critical writing skills. The wide variety of forms of writing used in the law all require clear and concise writing skills, and presuppose proficiency with standard English grammar, punctuation, and syntax.

3. Critical thinking skills. In both its oral and written formats, the practice of law requires skill at argumentation. Distinguishing a claim from the reasons given in support of it, as well as identifying and analyzing the arguments given in judicial decisions, are essential skills in the practice of law.

4. Understanding and analysis of the human institutions and values that are central to the law. Classes that offer insight into the historical development of the law, its impact on other aspects of human life, and the values it reflects are suggested.

Regardless of the choice of undergraduate major, students planning on law school should choose academically rigorous courses (particularly in the liberal arts) that develop all of the skills listed above. Juniors and seniors should choose 300- or 400- level courses for their electives, in addition to the upper division courses required by the student's major.

The Pre-Law Committee encourages all pre-law students to visit UDM's School of Law during their course of study. Two very useful contacts at the Law School are:

Kathleen H. Caprio
Assistant Dean – Admissions and Student Affairs(313) 596-0287

Bonnie D. Fitch
Associate Director – Admissions and Student Affairs(313) 596-0253

 

Psychology

Office: Reno Hall, McNichols Campus
Faculty: S. Abell; L. Blume; B. Green; H. Greene; M. Hannah; E. Hill; D. MacDonald; J. McCown; C. Munday; C. Panyard(Chair); M. Stack; C. Weisfeld; K. Zimmerman-Oster
E-mail: panyarcm@udmercy.edu

Psychology is the scientific study of behavior and mental processes. It differs from other fields that are concerned with the human condition in that it uses the scientific method. Psychologists attempt to understand the workings of individuals, animals and groups. Psychologists work in a variety of settings including universities and colleges, clinics and hospitals, business and industry, government agencies, law enforcement and the military. Psychology can be an academic or research discipline or an applied science.

The Psychology Department offers two majors. All psychology students are required to take a common core of courses in the foundations of psychology.

The General Psychology major is for students who intend to pursue careers in psychology. Such careers usually require at least the M.A. degree for entry-level employment. The General major is designed to provide a strong foundation for graduate study.

The Developmental Psychology major is designed for those students who wish to prepare themselves for careers in various helping professions immediately upon graduation. A Developmental Psychology major prepares students for careers in child care, child welfare and family life education. Through practica and special projects, a student can acquire expertise in working with a particular population. The Developmental Psychology major, with supporting courses, is designed to meet the academic requirements for provisional certification as a family life educator (CFLE) from the national Council on Family Relations.

General Psychology Major 37 cr.

PYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 cr.

STA 225 Statistics 3 cr.

PYC 250 Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 301 Experimental Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 341 Psychology of Personality 3 cr.

PYC 360-61 Social Psychology plus Laboratory 4 cr.

PYC 407 Physiological Psychology 4 cr.

PYC 409-10 Perceptual-Cognitive Processes4 cr.

PYC 412 History and Systems of Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 414-415 Psychology of Learning and Memory 4 cr.

PYC 420 Psychological Testing and Measurement 3 cr.

Developmental Psychology Major 35-40 cr.

PYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 233 Human Relationships and Guidance 3 cr.

PYC 250 Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 351 Family Development 3 cr.

PYC 440 Cross-Cultural Socialization 3 cr.

PYC 451 Psychology of Death and Dying 3 cr.

PYC 473 Basic Practicum 1-5 cr.

PYC 491 Research in Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

One of the following: 4 cr.

PYC 360-61 Social Psychology

PYC 407 Physiological Psychology

Two of the following: 6 cr.

PYC 234 Infancy/Early Childhood Development

PYC 236 Middle Childhood/Adolescent Development

PYC 256 Adult Development and Aging

One of the following: 3 cr.

STA 225 Elementary Statistics

PYC 301 Experimental Psychology

PYC 341 Psychology of Personality

Required core and supporting courses for Family Life Educator Certification. (See Developmental Psychology advisor.)

NCFR Certification in Family Life Education 24 cr*

Developmental Psychology Courses

233, 250, 351, 440, 473 (see above)

UDM Core Courses 6 cr.

ETH 359Ethics and Public Policy (Core 6A)

CJS 483 Family Violence (Core 6B)

or

ADS 417 Chemical Dependence (Core 6B)

Required Supporting courses 18 cr.

ADS 436 Family Theory and Therapy

BUS 290 Personal Finance

CST 204 Interpersonal Communication

HUS 422 Ethics in Human Services

LA 230 Family Law

PYS 275 Human Sexuality

* Students with other UDM majors or bachelor degrees from other institutions must complete the full approved program (39 credits)

 

Religious Studies

Office: Briggs Building, McNichols Campus Faculty: G. Albrecht; J. Kelly, S.J.; S. Mitchem; J. Rike; J. Saliba, S.J.; J. Schaberg; J. Tubbs (Chair)
Telephone: (313) 993-1287
E-mail: tubbsjb@udmercy.edu

The study of religion is an important branch of the humanities and an essential component in any well-grounded program of higher education. It is crucial for the understanding of any culture and it deals with serious issues for the self-understanding of students of any age. The Religious Studies Department offers programs designed to explore the variety of religious meanings which human beings have expressed in the past as well as those which continue to be expressed in the present.

Because of its roots in the Catholic tradition, this department offers a wide variety of courses on Christian themes and developments, while also offering students broad exposure to other traditions, such as Judaism, Islam, Hinduism, and Buddhism. Hoping to be a place where the best in contemporary Catholic thinking can encounter and exist in dialogue with other sources of contemporary thinking, the University regards the Religious Studies Department as a special focus of this encounter.

The Religious Studies curriculum is designed to serve three purposes within the University: (1) to provide introductory and survey courses in the study of religion that will be valuable for all undergraduates and available in all time slots; (2) to provide a major for students wishing to concentrate in the study of religion; (3) to provide a program leading to the master's degree for students wishing to engage in advanced studies.

Religious Studies Major 30 cr.

Religious Studies majors, and students who choose Religious Studies as a secondary area of concentration, are required to earn 30 credit hours in the field. Half of these credits must be earned in upper level courses (300 and 400 level).

To encourage a wide encounter with the varieties of religious expression, a student must take at least one course in each of the five areas into which Religious Studies is divided: world religions (other than Christianity), Biblical studies, Christian theology and spirituality, contemporary issues in religion, and ethics. A representative selection of courses in these areas will be offered days and evenings.

Near the end of their junior standing, majors are also required to submit a portfolio of exams and papers which, in their judgment, give evidence of their knowledge of the field, their skills of research and expression, and their personal appropriation of the materials they have covered. This is normally done in consultation with the student's faculty advisor. A faculty committee will review the portfolio and make such recommendations as may be appropriate for strengthening the student's senior year of study.

At the conclusion of the senior year, students are required to submit a completed portfolio of exams and papers for the departmental records. No additional grades are given for the portfolios. Their purpose is to assist the department in advising the students and assessing the effectiveness of the program.

 

Special Education
Learning Disabilities, Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered

Office: Reno Hall, McNichols Campus
Faculty: J. Gambini
E-mail: gambinjm@udmercy.edu

The College of Liberal Arts & Education offers two programs leading to endorsements in Special Education–Learning Disabilities and Emotionally Impaired/ Behaviorally Disordered. Learning Disabilities is a field of Special Education which deals with children who have average or above average intelligence but who are not able to learn in conventional ways. The Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered is a field of Special Education which deals with children who have average or above average intelligence but who are unable to learn or to function due to emotional and or behavioral problems. Students completing the requirements for either program earn a Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.Ed.) degree.

Special Education Program

Students majoring in the field are recommended for an elementary provisional certificate or a secondary provisional certificate. The special education major qualifies students to teach the special education category from kindergarten to grade 12. Additionally, the state elementary provisional certificate is valid for teaching all subjects in grades kindergarten to and including grade 5, for teaching the subject areas of the major or minor in grades 6 through 8. The state secondary provisional certificate is valid for teaching in subject areas in grades 7 to and including grade 12 in which the applicant has completed a major or minor.

Requirements

Course requirements for major programs in special education learning disabilities and emotionally impaired/behaviorally disordered are distributed as follows:

University Core Curriculum as Specified

Professional Education Core (36 cr. minimum)

Students planning to become certified to teach in learning disabilities or the emotionally impaired/behaviorally disordered must complete a minimum of 36 semester credit hours of coursework which include educational foundations, teaching methodology including instructional technology, reading instruction, special education, classroom observation and participation, and student teaching.

Teaching Minor (20-24 cr.)

Minors are chosen from those listed under elementary education program.

Learning Disabilities Major (39 cr.)

EDU 431 School and Classroom Management 3 cr.

PYC 250 Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 440 Cross-Cultural Socialization 3 cr.

SED 357 Special Education Field Experience 3 cr.

SED 370 Introduction to Special Education: Learning Disabilities 3 cr.

SED 371 Curriculum and Instruction: Learning Disabilities 3 cr.

SED 412 Special Education in the Secondary Schools 3 cr.

SED 453 Assessment in Special Education 3 cr.

SED 467 Strategies for Teaching Mathematics and Language Arts to the Learning Disabled 3 cr.

SED 486 Educating Diverse and Special Populations in the Inclusionary Setting3 cr.

SED 474 Directed Student Teaching: Special Education Learning Disabilities 6 cr.

Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered Major (39 cr.)

EDU 431 School and Classroom Management 3 cr.

PYC 250 Developmental Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 342 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr.

PYC 440 Cross-Cultural Socialization 3 cr.

SED 381 Special Education Field Experience 3 cr.

SED 380 Introduction to Special Education: Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered 3 cr.

SED 384 Curriculum and Instruction: Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered 3 cr.

SED 412 Special Education in the Secondary Schools 3 cr.

SED 453 Assessment in Special Education 3 cr.

SED 482 Educating Severely Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered and Autistic Students 3 cr.

SED 484 Directed Student Teaching: Special Education Emotionally Impaired 6 cr.

SED 486 Educating Diverse and Special Populations in the Inclusionary Setting 3 cr.

 

Sociology

Office: Briggs 135, McNichols Campus
Faculty: R. Homant (chair); L. Lewis; E. Barnes; D. Kennedy; M. Witkowski
Telephone: (313) 578-0362
E-mail: homantr@udmercy.edu

The Sociology Department is structured to accomplish three major objectives: academic excellence, the development of critical and analytical skills, and a humanitarian consciousness. These objectives serve to provide a foundation for students' future pursuits in graduate studies and career paths in corporations, social service agencies, educational institutions, government agencies, human services, health care, criminal justice, and self-employment. In addition, the objectives serve to enhance self esteem, quality of life, and interpersonal relationships of individual students.

To achieve these objectives, the department will provide five sub-fields in which students can gain a concentration of knowledge:

1. Violence, Crime, and Deviance

2. Industrial Relations, Workplace Behavior, and Conflict Management

3. Male/Female Relationships and Marriage and Family

4. Racial, Ethnic, and Cultural Diversity

5. Applied Social Research

As part of their 33 credit hours in Sociology, Students will be allowed to take 12 hours from other departments whose courses fit their concentration areas. Thus, both a general and specific body of knowledge in sociology will be gained. The course content of all courses will reflect the University's mission statement and the core objectives.

Sociology majors are prepared to do graduate study in sociology and related disciplines such as social work, criminal justice, market research, law, and urban planning. The methods, computer, and statistical skills learned in the major have wide application to other disciplines. The course array is especially attuned to an understanding of variables in social, political, and economic contexts.

Many students opt to pursue sociology as part of a double major in order to increase their marketability in the workplace. Because of its focus on every aspect of life, Sociology has become an attractive second major for students. Traditional, full-time students pursuing this option can graduate in four years. In addition, advising is available to accommodate the special needs and interests of students who double-major.

Sociology classes are well represented in the core curriculum. The following courses can be taken to satisfy University core requirements: Introduction to Sociology, Social Interaction, Cultural Anthropology, Blacks in Social Relations and Social Institutions, Urban Issues, Race and Ethnic Relations, and Contemporary Social Problems.

Basic Sociology Major: 33 cr.

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.

STA 225 Statistics 3 cr.

SOC 409 Social Science Theories 3 cr.

SOC 470 Research Methods 3 cr.

Elective 21 cr.

 

Social Work

Office: Briggs Building, McNichols Campus
Faculty: R. Daniels; R. Koenig ;A. Lampkin; K.Waters(Chair)
Telephone: (313) 993-1103
E-mail: waterskr@udmercy.edu

Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)

The Social Work program prepares students with a strong foundation in human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy and services, research methods and social work practice methods and skills. The program's objectives are to: 1) prepare students for beginning professional social work practice; 2) develop students' identification as social work professionals; 3) develop values, ethics and an understanding of social justice issues which are consistent with the philosophy and goals of the profession; 4) develop students' social work knowledge and skill for foundation to assure competent generalist practitioners for work with individuals, families, small groups, organizations and communities; 5) develop students' appreciation for and knowledge of research methodology that will enable them to effectively evaluate the service both they and others provide; 6) prepare students for graduate social work education. The preparation is based on a liberal arts foundation throughout the curriculum.

Accreditation

The undergraduate Social Work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

Admission Criteria

Admission to the program is selective and based upon the following:

• A written application submitted during the semester that SW 200 is completed

• A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 at the time of application

• Completion of the reading assessment test and completion of reading at the UAS 104 level and study skills at UAS 105, if needed

• A personal interview with the program director or a designated faculty member

• Completion of English at the 131 level

Review of the foregoing requirements will be made by the Social Work Admissions and Continuation Committee. The individual applying to the Social Work program will be notified of a decision after the review by the Admissions and Continuation Committee.

No required social work course grade below a ÒCÓ will be accepted. An overall GPA of 2.0 must be maintained.

Students must demonstrate ability in human relations and display professional values and attitudes consistent with the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics. Continuance in the program is contingent on consistent performance in regard to the above issues. Decisions about admissions, discontinuance and repeating of course work will be handled on an individual basis by the Admissions and Continuation Committee. A grievance procedure is available in the Social Work Handbook. The program reserves the right to require volunteer experience of students.

Program

The program includes the following:

Field Internship

Field Internship occurs during the student's senior year in the program. Students are required to spend 16 hours per week for two semesters (minimum 400 hours) in a human service agency where they are supervised by a qualified social worker. An application for Field Internship is to be obtained from the coordinator of field instruction. Personal interests of the student will be considered but placement will be based on the availability of appropriate social work supervision and an agency's conformity with the Social Work program requirements.

Field Instruction Prerequisites:

SW 200 Introduction to Social Work3 cr.

SW 210 Social Welfare and Social Justice3 cr.

SW 310 Social Welfare Policy 3 cr.

SW 320 Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment I 3 cr.

SW 325 Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment II 3 cr.

SW 399 Social Work Practice I 3 cr.

PYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 cr.

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.

Also required: completion of required volunteer experiences and a cumulative GPA 2.0.

Major Requirements

SW 200 Introduction to social work 3 cr.

SW 210 Social Welfare and Social Justice 3 cr.

SW 310 Social Welfare Policy 3 cr.

SW 320 Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment I 3 cr.

SW 325 Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment II 3 cr.

SW 370 Social Work Research Methods 3 cr.

SW 399 Social Work Practice I 3 cr.

SW 400 Social Work Practice II 3 cr.

SW 401 Social Work Practice III 3 cr.

SW 470 Field Instruction I 5 cr.

SW 471 Social Work Seminar I 2 cr.

SW 475 Field Instruction II 5 cr.

SW 476 Social Work Seminar II 2 cr.

Supportive Courses

Writing competency at the ENL 131 level, Reading competency at the UAS 104 level and Study Skills at UAS 105, Math competency at the MTH 101 level.

CST 101 Fundamentals of Speech 3 cr.

CIS 100 Introduction to Computers 3 cr.

PYC 100 Introductory Psychology 3 cr.

SOC 100 Introduction to Sociology 3 cr.

BIO 108 The Science of Life 3 cr.

POL 100 Introduction to Political Science 3 cr.

PYC 342 Abnormal Psychology 3 cr.

One of the following: 3 cr.

ECN 100 Introduction to Economics

ECN 295 Microeconomic Principles

One of the following: 3 cr.

ADS 100 Introduction to Substance Abuse

CJS 130 Introduction to Criminal Justice

One of the following: 3 cr.

HUS 496 Fundamentals of Statistics

MTH 214 Statistics

STA 225 Statistics

 

Theatre

Office: Marian Hall, Outer Drive Campus
Faculty: A. Beer; M. Choinski; Y. Fleischer; M. Pacha; D. Regal (Chair)
Telephone: (313) 993-6462
E-mail: regaldl@udmercy.edu

"Theatre" is both an academic department and a professional company. The theatre program at UDM provides an apprenticeship system of working with professional actors and directors. Classes are structured around an actor-intensive two-year conservatory system. The conservatory system is developed using smaller class size thus providing each actor with maximum master teacher guidance.

The professional theatre maintained by the B.F.A. faculty and students has a wide reputation for artistic excellence bringing positive media coverage and audiences to the Outer Drive campus from the entire metropolitan area

The Theatre Department is concerned with stimulating artistic expression by articulate, dynamic and creative people and is designed to prepare students to enter the profession as performers, directors, or educators. To this end, three interlocking methods are used.

First, departmental advisors build an individualized program for each student within the college core curriculum, and cognate courses.

Second, either the B.F.A. program or a specialized B. A. program is designed for each student in his or her area of concentration.

Finally, since application of techniques is essential to the performing arts, the department sponsors a season of at least four major productions and student directed one-acts. As members of the Theatre Company, students gain experience in all areas of theatre production, in plays reviewed by the major critics, and working alongside professional guest artists and faculty members. Roles in most productions are open to all students, and non-majors are encouraged to participate.

Theatre - Bachelor of Arts (B. A.)

The B. A. in Theatre is for those students interested in teaching, or in a more diversified liberal arts program.

Theatre Major 36 cr.

TRE 131 Introduction to Theatre 3 cr.

TRE 161 Fundamentals of Acting 3 cr.

TRE 266 Elements of Theatre Crafts 3 cr.

TRE 268 Acting II 3 cr.

Two of the following: (6 cr.)

TRE 430 Theatre History 3 cr.

or

TRE 431 Theatre History II 3 cr.

TRE 465 Fundamentals of Directing 3 cr.

TRE Electives 18 cr.

Theatre Minor 20 cr.

Theatre Major 20 cr.

TRE 131 Introduction to Theatre 3 cr.

TRE 161 Fundamentals of Acting 3 cr.

TRE 266 Elements of Theatre Crafts 3 cr.

TRE Electives 11 cr.

Theatre - Bachelor of Fine Arts (B.F.A.)

The main objective of this professionally oriented program is to provide intensified actor training for students who show potential for a career in the performing arts. Using the conservatory approach, the two-year program is entered in the junior year (acceptance pending audition), allowing the student time to mature, prepare, and evaluate his/her future goals and needs.

Entering freshmen will take two prerequisites in the first year (TRE 131 and TRE 161) and three prerequisites in their sophomore year (TRE 254, TRE 266 and TRE 268.) ENL 265, The Study of Drama is also required in the freshman or sophomore year. This course also fulfills Core Objective 5B. Most of the University Core Curriculum requirements must be completed in the freshman and sophomore years.

Following admission to the BFA program at the end of the sophomore year, the student must focus the junior and senior year on the demands of the program, apart from academic studies outside of the theatre. Each semester of the junior and senior year will nearly be filled with theatre courses exclusively. With the five prerequisites in the freshman and sophomore year, plus ENL 265, 52 hours remain in the junior and senior years. Eight total hours must be taken in Rehearsal and Production, typically one credit per semester in either TRE 132 or TRE 374.

A student may audition for the B.F.A. program at the end of the sophomore year. If the faculty feel the student displays maturity, capability, and promise of further development, he/she will be admitted as a sophomore. If the student is not ready for the program, he/she will be asked to re-audition in the following semester, or advised to enter the B. A. program.

The program is open to transfer students from other four-year universities, and community college graduates holding associate degrees, as well as University of Detroit Mercy and other consortium college students.

All B.F.A. students are organized as members of a professional performing company. They attend classes daily, Monday through Friday. Typically, five hours per day are devoted to class work while evenings and weekends are devoted to work on major productions, studio performance, and scene rehearsals.

Candidates accepted for the B.F.A. program might elect to specialize in either acting or directing.

Acting Sequence 66 cr.

Students specializing in acting will receive training in stage movement, period acting styles, contemporary acting methods and process, voice and diction, directing and theatre history. The Study of Drama in the English department is a shared requirement. Vocal music and dance are recommended.

The following are required courses:

Prerequisites 14 cr.

TRE 131 Introduction to Theatre 3 cr.

TRE 161 Fundamentals of Acting 3 cr.

TRE 254 Voice and Movement 2 cr.

TRE 266 Elements of Theatre Craft 3 cr.

TRE 268 Acting I I3 cr.

BFA Program 52 cr.

TRE 350 Scene Study BFA 3 cr.

TRE 351 Acting Dynamics BFA 3 cr.

TRE 352 Acting Styles BFA 3 cr.

TRE 354 Voice and Movement BFA 2 cr.

TRE 355 Scene Study BFA 3 cr.

TRE 356 Acting Dynamics BFA 3 cr.

TRE 357 Acting Styles BFA 3 cr.

TRE 359 Voice and Movement BFA 2 cr.

TRE 430 Theatre History I 3 cr.

TRE 431 Theatre History II 3 cr.

TRE 450 Scene Study BFA 3 cr.

TRE 451 Acting Dynamics BFA 3 cr.

TRE 452 Acting Styles BFA 3 cr.

TRE 455 Scene Study BFA 3 cr.

TRE 456Acting Dynamics BFA 3 cr.

TRE 457 Acting Styles 3 cr.

TRE 459 Voice and Movement BFA 3 cr.

TRE 465 Fundamentals of Directing 3 cr.

Electives 2-8 cr.

TRE 132 Rehearsal and Production 1-4 cr.

TRE 374 Rehearsal and Production II 1-4 cr.

Required - Outside Department 3 cr.

Study of Drama 3 cr.

Directing Sequence 57-61 cr.

Students specializing in directing will spend the first year working with the actors. The second year, they will not only take the Fundamentals of Directing course, but a directed study culminating in a full-length production. They will also demonstrate competence in the fields of stage management, publicity, and drama literature (as a cognate) as well as all backstage areas.

The following are required courses:

TRE 131 Introduction to the Theatre 3 cr.

TRE 132 Rehearsal & Production 1-3 cr.

TRE 161 Fundamentals of Acting 3 cr.

TRE 266 Elements of Theatre Crafts 3 cr.

TRE 268 Acting II 3 cr.

TRE 350 Scene Study BFA 3 cr.

TRE 351 Acting Dynamics BFA 3 cr.

TRE 352 Acting Styles BFA 3 cr.

TRE 354 Voice and Diction BFA 2 cr.

TRE 355 Scene Study BFA 3 cr.

TRE 357 Acting Styles BFA 3 cr.

TRE 359 Voice and Diction BFA 2 cr.

TRE 374 Rehearsal & Production II 1-3 cr.

TRE 430 Theatre History I 3 cr.

TRE 431 Theatre History II 3 cr.

TRE 465 Fundamentals of Directing 3 cr.

TRE 495 Directed Reading in Theatre 1-3 cr.

TRE 497 Directed Studies in Directing 1-3 cr.

TRE Electives 2 cr.

 

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