College of Education and Human Services

Office: Manning Hall 4th Floor, Outer Drive Campus
Dean: William S. Dunifon
Associate Dean: Karen Mallory-Waters
Telephone: (313) 993-6315
Fax: (313) 993-6303
E-mail:
education@udmercy.edu

The College of Education and Human Services prepares students to play a direct role in improving the quality of life in their communities.

The College offers programs in teacher education, educational administration, criminal justice, legal assistant studies, legal administration, counseling and addiction studies, special education, social work and human services.

As a primary source of teachers and human service professionals for our community, we have a tremendous opportunity to influence the human condition in a very real, very positive way. With this comes a special responsibility to ensure our graduates are well educated, highly skilled and ready to meet the professional challenges ahead.

Our graduates are ethical, value-directed professionals who possess the ability to think critically, work independently and translate knowledge into action.

Programs Offered
Addiction Studies (Associate of Science, Bachelor of Science)
• Criminal Justice Studies (Bachelor of Science)
• Human Services (Bachelor of Science)
• Legal Administration (Bachelor of Arts)
• Legal Assistant (Associate of Arts)
• Social Work (Bachelor of Social Work)
• Special Education (Bachelor of Science in,Education)
Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered
Learning Disabilities
• Teacher Education (Bachelor of Arts, Bachelor of Science)
Elementary Education
Secondary Education
Waldorf Elementary Education

 

Degrees
The undergraduate programs are primarily designed for full-time or part-time students. Evening, weekend, undergraduate and post degree Teacher Certification courses are offered.

 

Advising
An advisor will be assigned to a student enrolling in the College of Education and Human Services upon admission to the College.

 

University Core Curriculum
As specified by the University core curriculum and the College of Education and Human Services. See page 93 for more information.

 

Cooperative Education
Cooperative Education allows students to gain practical work experience related to their major and career goals. The structured program combines periods of paid training in business, industry, and government with periods of classroom study. Students register for HSC 391, HSC 392 and HSC 393 during their first, second and third co-op assignments. Students must register for CEC 300 prior to the semester in which they intend to enter the Cooperative Education Program. For further details, see the Cooperative Education Program section in this catalog.

 

Addiction Studies

Office: Manning Hall 449, Outer Drive Campus
Faculty: C. Anderson; J. Franklin; R. Sinacola; G. Wehmer; J.Whitledge
Telephone: (313) 993-6306
E-mail:
frankljt@udmercy.edu

The Addiction Studies program educates students in the knowledge and skills required to provide prevention, assessment, referral and treatment services in addiction areas. The curriculum places major emphasis on chemical addictions while exploring the broader range of addictive behaviors. The interplay of mental illness and addiction is a focus as well. The program is interdisciplinary, including courses in the behavioral and physical sciences, the humanities as well as addiction studies. The practical experience of the internship is an important part of the curriculum.

The career mobility concept of education is utilized. The associate of science is a 63-hour program which can be completed in two years of full-time enrollment. An additional 63 hours is required for the bachelor of science. Students can conveniently pursue the program on a part-time basis. Transfer credit will shorten the program. Courses are scheduled evenings and weekends to accommodate the working student.

The B.S. graduate meets the prerequisites for the M.A. in Addictions Counseling or Agency Counseling and for the M.A. in Clinical Psychology. The B.S. graduate meets the education and internship requirements for the Certified Addiction Counselor (CAC) credential awarded by the State of Michigan.

 

Admission Requirements

Associate Degree
In addition to meeting the requirements for admission to the University, applicants who are recovering from addiction must demonstrate total abstinence for two years from all via association with a recognized recovery program. An applicant may be asked to provide the results of an approved medical examination or psychological evaluation.

Baccalaureate Degree
A. Successful completion of the associate degree requirements
B. Recommendation of the faculty of Addiction Studies

 

Programs

Addiction Studies-Associate of Science (27 cr.)
Required:

ADS 100

Introduction to Substance Abuse

3 cr.

ADS 120

Assessment, Referral, and Treatment Methods

3 cr.

ADS 241

Techniques of Individual Counseling

3 cr.

ADS 242

Addiction Counseling Internship

3 cr.

BIO 108

The Science of Life

3 cr.

PYC 100

Introductory Psychology

3 cr.

PYC 341

Psychology of Personality

3 cr.

PYC 342

Abnormal Psychology

3 cr.

 

One of the following: 3 cr.

SW 200

Introduction to Social Work

CJS 130

Introduction to Criminal Justice

Addiction Studies-Bachelor of Science (52 cr.)

Required:

AD 100

Introduction to Substance Abuse

3 cr.

ADS 120

Assessment, Referral, and Treatment Methods

3 cr.

ADS 241

Techniques of Individual Counseling

3 cr.

ADS 242

Addiction Counseling Internship

3 cr.

ADS 436

Family Theory and Therapy

3 cr.

ADS 443

Group Methods

3 cr.

ADS 444

Advanced Internship

3 cr.

ADS 495

Addictive Populations

3 cr.

BIO 108

The Science of Life

3 cr.

PYC 100

Introductory Psychology

3 cr.

PYC 341

Psychology of Personality

3 cr.

PYC 342

Abnormal Psychology

3 cr.

PYC 407

Physiological Psychology

4 cr.

STA 225

Statistics

3 cr.

Two of the following: 6 cr.

ADS 417

Chemical Dependence and Youth

ADS 418

Compulsive Gambling I

ADS 419

Compulsive Gambling II

ADS 420

Compulsive Gambling III

ADS 447

Employee Assistance Programming

ADS 450

Prevention and Intervention in Substance Abuse

ADS 460

Spirituality and Recovery

ADS 470

Qualitative Research

One of the following: 3 cr.

SW 200

Introduction to Social Work

CJS 130

Introduction to Criminal Justice

 

Internship Site
Over 30 substance abuse prevention, referral, and treatment agencies throughout Southeast Michigan and Southern Ontario are affiliated with the University for field placements in Addiction Studies.

 

Continued Matriculation/ Graduation Requirements
A. A grade of "C" must be earned in all courses required for the major. An overall GPA of 2.0 must be maintained.
B. Students recovering from addiction who experience a failure in abstinence while in the program will be expected to demonstrate two years sobriety once again in order to continue matriculation and to graduate.

 

Undergraduate Certificate in Addiction Studies
The Undergraduate Certificate in Addictions Studies is intended for students who are pursuing an undergraduate degree degree in a professional discipline that would enable them to work effectively in the prevention of, intervention into, or treatment of addictive disorders. Because of the education and professional training that the student brings to the program from his or her own major discipline, it is possible to provide a curriculum of course work and field experience in Addiction Studies totaling eighteen credit hours that prepares the student to work effectively on behalf of those adversely affected by addictive disorders.

 

Addictions Counseling Certification
The State of Michigan sponsors the Certified Addictions Counselor credential (CAC). It is compulsory for most professionals counseling chemically dependent clients in this and many other states. The ADS Certificate program provides all the educational and practicum hours required for the CAC should the student choose a counseling profession and pursue this credential. Additional requirements (state examinations and clinical hours) are the responsibility of the graduate.

 

Admission Requirements
1. Admission to undergraduate studies at UDM.
2. Admission to a major which would interface effectively with the Certificate. (Students without such a major may be asked to take support courses.)
3. Submission of program application accompanied by a statement of career goals.
4. Interview with the program director or a designated faculty member.

 

Curriculum
The curriculum has three components:

1. A core of four required courses totaling 12 credits:

ADS 100

Introduction to Substance Abuse

3 cr.

ADS 120

Assessment, Referral, and Treatment Methods

3 cr.

ADS 241

Techniques of Individual Counseling

3 cr.

ADS 436

Family Theory and Therapy

3 cr.

 

2. One elective course totaling 3 credits chosen from the following list:

ADS 417

Chemical Dependence and Youth

3 cr.

ADS 418, 419, 420

Compulsive Gambling

1-3 cr.

ADS 443

Group Methods

3 cr.

ADS 447

Employee Assistance Programming

3 cr.

ADS 450

Prevention and Intervention in Substance Abuse

3 cr.

ADS 460

Spirituality and Recovery

3 cr.

ADS 495

Addictive Populations

3 cr.

3. A clinical component totaling three credits to be fulfilled as a field placement of 300 hours in an addictions prevention or treatment agency. It can be done in conjunction with a clinical requirement in the student's major field. 3 cr.

Total semester hours required: 18 cr.


Criminal Justice Studies

Office: 135 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: R. Homant (chair); D. Kennedy; M. Witkowski
Telephone: (313) 993-1051
E-mail:
homantr@udmercy.edu

Courses in criminal justice lead to a Bachelor of Science degree in Criminal Justice, which prepares one to work in a wide variety of careers, public and private, at various levels of responsibility. These careers include federal, state, and local policing; other regulatory agencies of various branches of government; various levels of private investigation and private security; and a variety of careers in corrections, including parole and probation as well as institutional corrections. Students planning on pursuing a law degree have often found criminal justice a relevant major.

Criminal Justice is an interdisciplinary area that draws much of its content from law, psychology, political science, and sociology. The goal of the criminal justice curriculum is to make students aware of the key issues, concepts, and theories involved in understanding the operation of the criminal justice system. With this knowledge, students are taught to analyze the practical issues and controversies of the field. Problem solving, the ability to make discriminating judgments, and the application of theory to practice are key skills that the program fosters.

 

Program
Students are required to complete course requirements in three general areas: (a) University core curriculum (approximately 45 cr.), (b) supportive courses and (c) major concentration.

 

University Core Curriculum
See page 93 for more information on the University core curriculum.

Supportive Courses (15 cr)

To insure that they have a good background in the key areas on which criminal justice is based, students will take :

PYC 342

Abnormal Psychology

3 cr.

POL 100

Introduction to Political Science

3 cr.

SOC 100

Introduction to Sociology

3 cr.

 

At least two of the following three courses: 6 cr.

LA 110

Introduction to Law

ADS 100

Introduction to Substance Abuse

HUS 150/SW 200

Intro to Human Services or Social Work

Note: in the case of the introductory courses listed above, students may substitute a higher level course in the same discipline, with the consent of their advisor.

 

Criminal Justice
Major

Required (36 cr.)

CJS 130

Introduction to Criminal Justice

3 cr.

COR 131

Introduction to Corrections

3 cr.

CJS 395

Criminal Investigation

3 cr.

CJS 410

Criminal Law

3 cr.

CJS 415

Juvenile Justice

3 cr.

CJS 420

Evidence and Criminal Procedure

3 cr.

CJS 451

Criminology and Penology

3 cr.

CJS 454

Sociology of Deviant Behavior

3 cr.

CJS 492

Senior Seminar: Theory and Research in Criminal Justice

3 cr.

Electives ( 9 cr.)

Any three among CJS, COR, and SEC

Principal Criminal Justice Electives

SEC 401

Security Systems

3 cr.

CJS 250

Introduction to Police Administration

3 cr.

CJS 402

Court Structures and Functions

3 cr.

CJS 405

Directed Studies

1-3 cr.

CJS 452

Organized Crime

3 cr.

CJS 480

Theory of Law Enforcement

3 cr.

CJS 481

Women, Crime and Justice

3 cr.

CJS 482

Terrorism

3 cr.

CJS 483

Family Violence: Spouse and Child Abuse

3 cr.

CJS 484

Psychology, Psychiatry, and the Law

3 cr.

CJS 485

Critical Issues in Criminal Justice

3 cr.

CJS 487

Victimology

3 cr.

CJS 490

Internship in Criminal Justice Studies

3 cr.

CJS 495

Criminalistics

3 cr.

COR 401

Correctional Counseling

 

COR 450

Institutional Corrections

 

HUS 441

Multicultural Understanding

3 cr.

 

Field Experience
The Criminal Justice Studies major may obtain field experience in two programs:
1. Cooperative Education – planned paid experience in federal, state, and local law enforcement and correctional agencies as well as private security and campus police.
2. Internship – students have a 180 hour supervised experience under the direction of a faculty member.

 

Geography:
For the general interest of students the College offers courses in geography. Geography is concerned with the spatial organization of both physical and human phenomena on the surface of the earth, as well as, those phenomena that give character to particular places.

GEO 211

World Regional Geography

3 cr.

GEO 212

Geography of Michigan

3 cr.

 

Human Services

Office: 135 Briggs, McNichols Campus
Faculty: R. Homant (chair); D. Kennedy; M. Witkowski
Telephone: (313) 993-1051
E-mail:
homantr@udmercy.edu

Projected to be one of the fastest growing job fields in the first decade of the next century, Human Services is a family of careers designed for those who want to work with people. Whether one’s goal is to try to make the world a better place, or–more modestly–simply to help a few people cope better with life, Human Services equips students with the basic knowledge and skills necessary to function in a professional capacity.

Course work in Human Services leads to a Bachelor of Science degree which prepares one for a wide variety of positions in both public and private service agencies, as well as some areas of private enterprise. Human Services professionals work with a wide variety of individuals, including: the unemployed, the unskilled, the physically and emotionally handicapped, convicted offenders, substance abusers, troubled youth, the elderly and the physically ill. They work with individuals, families, and neighborhood groups in community mental health centers, hospitals, hospices, correctional facilities, and other state agencies, as well as in human resources and training and development in private industry.

Human Services is an interdisciplinary field with many diverse opportunities and challenges. The Human Services student takes a basic set of eight core courses that are supported by an individualized program tailored to the student’s needs.

Flexibility makes the Human Services program attractive to a broad range of students: service-oriented, traditional undergraduates; community college graduates who have already completed a program in a human services specialty area; those currently employed who wish to enhance their advancement potential; and students whose goal is post-degree work in counseling or a related area.

 

Requirements
Students are required to complete course requirements in four general areas:
(a) University core curriculum (approximately 45 cr.),
(b) supportive courses,
(c) major and
(d) minor concentration.

 

University Core Requirements
See page 93 for more information on the University Core Curriculum.

Supportive Courses (12 cr.)

To insure that they have a good background in the key areas on which human services is based, students will take:

PYC 100

Introduction to Psychology

3 cr.

POL 100

Introduction to Political Science

3 cr.

SOC 100

Introduction to Sociology

3 cr.

SW 200

Introduction to Social Work

3 cr.

or

 

 

SW 210

Social Welfare and Social Justice

3 cr.

Note: These courses may also fulfill University core requirements. Also, students may substitute a higher level course in the same discipline, with the consent of their advisor and the department chair.

Major Requirements

(24 cr. of HUS & 15 cr. of specialization)

HUS (24 cr.)

HUS 150

Introduction to Human Services

3 cr.

HUS 342

Human Services Leadership

3 cr.

HUS 422

Ethics and Values in Human Services

3 cr.

HUS 437

Counseling Process in Human Services

3 cr.

HUS 441

Multicultural Understanding

3 cr.

HUS 491

Internship in Human Services

3 cr.

HUS 495

Human Resources Development

3 cr.

HUS 499

Integrating Seminar in Human Services

3 cr.

Note: with the permission of their academic advisor and the department chair, students who demonstrate sufficient background in one of the above courses may substitute an alternate HUS course.

Human Services Specialization: (15 cr.)

Normally consists of five courses in a human services area. Some suggested areas include: addiction studies, criminal justice, corrections, education, legal assistant, psychology and social work. While it is usually preferable that all five sources come from the same content area (e.g. all CJS courses), some areas of specialization, such as "family studies" are cross disciplinary.

 

Minor Concentration
The minor concentration is a second area of specialization. Normally a minor involves six to eight courses in an area. The minor is not required to be related to the student’s Human Services specialization. It may be in a traditional academic subject area (e.g., History, English, Business, etc.) or it may be a blend of related courses across disciplines, either within or outside of the human services field. Students intending to work in a business setting are encouraged to use the Business Certificate (see page 18) for their area of concentration. The minor is intended as a flexible requirement that will enhance the student’s credentials. Students are encouraged to consult their advisors about various possibilities.

 

Legal Administration

Office: Manning Hall 449, Outer Drive Campus
Faculty: R. Berg (interim-chair)
Telephone: (313) 993-6306
E-mail:
bergmcqueen@aol.com

The Legal Administration program, which leads to a Bachelor of Arts degree, is designed to assist individuals in acquiring the skills necessary to manage the complex mixture of personnel, technology and business that is the modern law office.

A Legal Administration major must complete a 36 credit core. Students may select 12 credits of electives from such areas as Legal Assistant, Management, Accounting, Computer and Information Systems, Criminal Justice, or Psychology. The specific electives will be selected to meet the student’s individual needs.

Students may also select a three or six credit internship in a private or corporate law firm, government or judicial office, or public service organization or placement in one of our practicum sites. The internship program director will assist students with placement.

Independent study or directed research is also available for up to six credits. All topics must be approved by the program director at the time of registration and submitted to the Registrar.

This major is also offered at our extension site at the Macomb University Center. For more information about the Macomb University Center, please contact the director, Robert S. Berg at (810) 263-6232.

 

Weekend College
The Legal Administration program is offered in both the evening and Weekend College programs to meet the needs of adult students living in the Metropolitan area. The Legal Administration degree can be completed on the weekend as all core courses are offered in the Weekend College at least once every two years. Students taking classes on weekends may also enroll in day or evening classes. More information on the Weekend College is available on page 119.

 

Baccalaureate Degree

LA 110

Introduction to Law

3 cr.

LA 280

Legal Research and Analysis I

3 cr.

LAD 312

Law Practice Management

3 cr.

LAD 340

Labor Relations

3 cr.

LAD 346

Human Resource Management

3 cr.

LAD 351

Legal Accounting

3 cr.

LAD 411

Legal Computer Applications

3 cr.

LAD 430

Leadership Skills

3 cr.

HUS 440

Multicultural Understanding

3 cr.

LAD 450

Marketing the Law Firm

3 cr.

LAD 460

Legal Ethics

3 cr.

LAD 465

Personal Finance

3 cr.

A grade of "C" must be maintained in all courses required for the major. A GPA of 2.0 must also be maintained. Students must also complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. More information of the University Core Curriculum is available on page 93.

Electives 12 cr.

Any LA or CJS course, or any LAD Internship or Direct Study. Any of the following:

LAD 452

Legal Website Design

3 cr.

LAD 490

Law Office Practicum

3-6 cr.

 

Legal Assistant

Office: Manning Hall 448, Outer Drive Campus
Faculty: R. Berg (interim-chair)
Telephone: (313) 993-6306
E-mail:
bergmcqueen@aol.com

The Legal Assistant program offers an Associate of Art degree which is approved by the American Bar Association. A Legal Assistant Certificate is also available.

The program is designed to train legal assistants and paralegals to work with attorneys in carrying out such basic tasks as research, pleading and document drafting, interviewing clients and witnesses, investigation, file and data organization and case preparation. While the legal assistant cannot give legal advice or appear in court, the tasks may be performed at the discretion and supervision of a licensed attorney. The Legal Assistant program affords graduates a strong general background in several key areas of the modern legal system, along with specific skills required to assist with attorney preparation.

Substantive course areas such as contracts, personal injury, probate, property, evidence and litigation skills are taught with a focus on the student's successful completion of the Certified Legal Assistant examination. The Legal Assistant faculty recommends that students of the Legal Assistant program take this exam immediately upon receiving their

Associate of Arts degree.

After receiving an Associate's degree, many Legal Assistant students continue their study toward a Bachelor's Degree in the Legal Administration program. Some students eventually attend law school. If these same students work while finishing their bachelor's and graduate study, they have a major advantage in the workplace as trained legal assistants. This advantage is magnified for those who have successfully tested for certification.

 

Writing Assessment Requirement
Due to the critical importance of English composition skills to the legal assistant profession, all students including transfer students must take the English placement test offered through University Advising and Academic Services prior to earning any academic credit toward the completion of the degree.

 

Weekend College
The Legal Assistant program is offered in both the evening and Weekend College programs to meet the needs of adult students living in the Metropolitan area. The Legal Assistant degree can be completed on the weekend as all core courses are offered in the Weekend College at least once every two years. More information on the Weekend College is available on page 119.

 

Associate of Arts Degree
Professional Sequence

LA 110

Introduction to Law

3 cr.

LA 130

Litigation I

3 cr.

LA 131

Litigation II

3 cr.

LA 280

Legal Research & Analysis I

3 cr.

LA 281

Legal Research & Analysis II

3 cr.

LAD 312

Law Practice Management

3 cr.

LAD 411

Legal Computer Applications

3 cr.

Any four additional legal specialty courses

12 cr.

Students must also complete the University Core Curriculum requirements. More information of the University Core Curriculum is available on page 93.

In general, it is recommended that students take Introduction to Law, Litigation Skills I and II, and Legal Research I before taking any legal specialty courses. Exceptions may be arranged with the advisor.

A grade of "C" must be maintained in all required Legal Assistant and supporting courses. A GPA of 2.0 must also be maintained.

 

Certificate Program
A Legal Assistant Certificate program is also offered for students who already have obtained a four-year bachelor’s degree from an accredited college or university. This is a non-degree program.

The Certificate program requires completion of 33 credit hours in the Legal Assistant Curriculum. The required courses are as

follows:

Professional Sequence

LA 110

Introduction to Law

3 cr.

LA 130

Litigation I

3 cr.

LA 131

Litigation II

3 cr.

LA 280

Legal Research & Analysis I

3 cr.

LA 281

Legal Research & Analysis II

3 cr.

LAD 312

Law Practice Management

3 cr.

LAD 411

Legal Computer Applications

3 cr.

Any four additional legal specialty courses

12 cr.

Required supporting course: CIS 100
A grade of C must be maintained in all required Legal Assistant Certificate and supporting courses. A GPA of 2.0 must also be maintained.

 

Social Work

Office: Manning Hall 449, Outer Drive Campus
Faculty: R. Daniels; R. Koenig (interim chair)
Telephone: (313) 993-6316
E-mail:
koenigrp@udmercy.edu

Bachelor of Social Work (B.S.W.)
The Social Work program prepares students with a strong foundation in human behavior and the social environment, social welfare policy and services, research methods and social work practice methods and skills. The program’s objectives are to: 1) prepare students for beginning professional social work practice; 2) develop students’ identification as social work professionals; 3) develop values, ethics and an understanding of social justice issues which are consistent with the philosophy and goals of the profession; 4) develop students’ social work knowledge and skill for foundation to assure competent generalist practitioners for work with individuals, families, small groups, organizations and communities; 5) develop students’ appreciation for and knowledge of research methodology that will enable them to effectively evaluate the service both they and others provide; 6) prepare students for graduate social work education. The preparation is based on a liberal arts foundation throughout the curriculum.

 

Accreditation
The undergraduate Social Work program is accredited by the Council on Social Work Education.

 

Admission Criteria
Admission to the program is selective and based upon the following:

• A written application submitted during the semester that SW 200 is completed
• A minimum cumulative grade point average of 2.0 at the time of application
• Completion of the reading assessment test and completion of reading at the UAS 104 level and Study Skills at UAS 105, if needed
• A personal interview with the program director or a designated faculty member
• Completion of English at the 131 level

Review of the foregoing requirements will be made by the Social Work Admissions and Continuation Committee. The individual applying to the Social Work program will be notified of a decision after the review by the Admissions and Continuation Committee.

No required social work course grade below a "C" will be accepted. An overall G.P.A. of 2.0 must be maintained.

Students must demonstrate ability in human relations and display professional values and attitudes consistent with the National Association of Social Workers (NASW) Code of Ethics. Continuance in the program is contingent on consistent performance in regard to the above issues. Decisions about admissions, discontinuance and repeating of course work will be handled on an individual basis by the Admissions and Continuation Committee. A grievance procedure is available in the Social Work Handbook. The program reserves the right to require volunteer experience of students.

 

Program
The program includes the following:

Field Internship
Field Internship occurs during the student’s senior year in the program. Students are required to spend 16 hours per week for two semesters (minimum 400 hours) in a human service agency where they are supervised by a qualified social worker. An application for Field Internship is to be obtained from the coordinator of Field Instruction. Personal interests of the student will be considered but placement will be based on the availability of appropriate social work supervision and an agency’s conformity with the Social Work Program requirements.

Field Instruction Prerequisites:

SW 200

Introduction to Social Work

3 cr.

SW 210

Social Welfare and Social Justice

3 cr.

SW 310

Social Welfare Policy

3 cr.

SW 320

Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment I

3 cr.

SW 325

Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment II

3 cr.

SW 399

Social Work Practice I

3 cr.

PYC 100

Introductory Psychology

3 cr.

SOC 100

Introduction to Sociology

3 cr.

Also required: completion of required volunteer experiences and a cumulative G.P.A. 2.0.

Major Requirements

SW 200

Introduction to social work

3 cr.

SW 210

Social Welfare and Social Justice

3 cr.

SW 310

Social Welfare Policy

3 cr.

SW 320

Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment I

3 cr.

SW 325

Human Behavior in a Multicultural Environment II

3 cr.

SW 370

Social Work Research Methods

3 cr.

SW 399

Social Work Practice I

3 cr.

SW 400

Social Work Practice II

3 cr.

SW 401

Social Work Practice III

3 cr.

SW 470

Field Instruction I

5 cr.

SW 471

Social Work Seminar I

2 cr.

SW 475

Field Instruction II

5 cr.

SW 476

Social Work Seminar II

2 cr.

 

Supportive Courses
Writing competency at the ENL 131 level, Reading competency at the UAS 104 level and Study Skills at UAS 105, Math competency at the MTH 101 level.

CST 101

Fundamentals of Speech

3 cr.

CIS 100

Introduction to Computers

3 cr.

PYC 100

Introductory Psychology

3 cr.

SOC 100

Introduction to Sociology

3 cr.

BIO 108

The Science of Life

3 cr.

POL 100

Introduction to Political Science

3 cr.

PYC 342

Abnormal Psychology

3 cr.

One of the following: 3 cr.

ECN 100

Introduction to Economics

ECN 295

Microeconomic Principles

One of the following: 3 cr.

ADS 100

Introduction to Substance Abuse

CJS 130

Introduction to Criminal Justice

One of the following: 3 cr.

HUS 496

Fundamentals of Statistics

MTH 214

Statistics

STA 225

Statistics

Teacher Education

Office: Manning Hall 426, Outer Drive
Faculty: E. Carlson (chair); B. Beaubien-Costello; J. Gambini; N. Gibney; J. Letscher; I. McKinnon; S. McKisick; J. Morris; L. Williams
Telephone: (313) 993-6308
E-mail:
carlsoea@udmercy.edu

Teacher Education with State of Michigan certification is available in four areas: Elementary Education, Waldorf Education, Secondary Education and Special Education.

The Teacher Education programs of the College of Education and Human Services prepare effective and responsible professional teachers who have a commitment to the implementation of the Education Department’s Code of Professional Ethics. This professional teacher will have an impact on school reform, the community and society into the 21st century. Education faculty help students become ethical, caring, value-directed persons who possess a commitment to urban society and social justice. Students also gain competency in the art and science of teaching from a research knowledge base and continue to be inquiring-reflective educators. The cosmopolitan nature of our metropolitan area (multi-cultural, multi-talented, handicapped as well as gifted) provides a perfect laboratory for the education of the professional teacher.

 

Teacher Certification Program Requirements*
*Teacher certification requirements listed are subject to changes mandated by the Michigan State Board of Education.

The process for pursuing teacher certification has several steps. An application and a departmental action are required at each of the steps listed below. Additionally, all education students are required to pass the three sections (reading, writing, and mathematics) of the State-required Michigan Basic Skills Test (MBST) within the first two semesters of enrollment in teacher education courses. Students will not be permitted to register for further coursework until all sections of the MBST are passed.

1. Entry into Teacher Education. Students who wish to begin taking teacher education courses must schedule an appointment with the associate or assistant dean of the College of Education and Human Services, who will assist the student with a plan of work toward the desired level of certification.

Students can begin taking education courses at this stage. These include EDU 401 or 402, EDU 420, EDU 432, EDU 440, EDU 459, SED 460. EDU 401/402 and EDU 432 must be taken in the first two semesters of enrollment. (See following pages for course prerequisites.) Education methods courses cannot be taken at this stage.

Students must present passing scores for the reading, writing, and mathematics sections of the Michigan Basic Skills Test (MBST) prior to teacher education coursework beyond EDU 401/402.

2. Entry into the Teacher Certification Program. Upon completion of the MBST requirement and at least 12 credit hours in the major and minor, students are eligible for entry into the Teacher Certification Program. Application must be made to enter the Teacher Certification Program. The application package can be obtained from the Education Department offices, and must be completed and returned to an Education office. Requirements for entry into a teacher education program are listed in the current Teacher Certification Handbook.

Upon acceptance into the Teacher Certification Program, students must complete all remaining education courses, including the methods courses. For elementary certification these include EDU 441, 442, 443, 448, and 449. For Secondary certification these courses are: EDU 469, 478, and one 470’s (content area methods course in certification major).

Students must also pass the state-required Michigan Test for Teacher Certification content area tests in the major and minor fields of certification before admission to student teaching.

3. Student Teaching. The student must apply to enter student teaching. To qualify, students must have completed all education coursework. Application must be made by February 1 for the following fall semester (Term I) and by October 1 for the following winter semester (Term II). The application package listing all requirements can be obtained when the student makes an appointment with the Coordinator of Student Teaching Placements in Manning Hall (dooleymm@udmercy.edu).

4. Recommendation for Certification. Students apply for certification in the final semester. Students cannot be recommended for certification to the state of Michigan until all degree requirements and certification requirements have been completed, including the passing of the Michigan Test for Teacher Certification (MTTC) content area tests in the candidate’s major and minor.

 

Programs
The College of Education and Human Services offers programs which lead to a Bachelor of Arts degree with elementary certification. The College also offers a Bachelor of Arts degree with secondary education certification for selected majors: social studies and science. The Bachelor of Science in Education is offered in the teacher certification program in Special Education.

Students who wish to complete the requirements for a secondary education teaching certificate do so in conjunction with a degree program in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Engineering and Science.

They pursue the degree program in their respective colleges and are recommended for a teaching certificate by the College of Education and Human Services when the certification requirements are completed.

The College of Education and Human Services also offers a teacher certification program for individuals who possess a baccalaureate degree from an accredited college or university. The program may be pursued on a part-time, late afternoon or evening basis with the exception of the student teaching requirement which is a 15-week semester of full-day attendance. Students in the post-degree program must satisfy all teacher certification program requirements.

 

Elementary Education
Students preparing to teach in the elementary school pursue a Bachelor of Arts degree with a teaching major and a teaching minor in an academic subject area in addition to the University core curriculum requirements and the professional education sequence of courses.

 

Weekend College
The Elementary Education program is offered in both the evening and Weekend College programs to meet the needs of adult students living in the metropolitan area. The degree can be completed on the weekend as all core courses are offered in the Weekend College at least once every two years. Students taking classes on weekends may also enroll in day or evening classes. More information on the Weekend College is available on page 119.

 

Teaching Majors and Minors
A teaching major consists of not less than 30 semester hours in a single discipline or 36 semester hours in a group of disciplines. A teaching minor consists of not less than 20 semester hours in a single discipline and 24 semester hours in a group of disciplines. Teaching majors and teaching minors must be appropriate to the elementary school. Students should consult their Education advisor regarding courses for the teaching major and the teaching minor as well as other program requirements. The department reserves the right to require specific courses in the major and minor.

The following teaching majors and minors are approved by the State Board of Education for Elementary Certification:

English, Speech, Language Arts, Economics*, History, Political Science*, Social Studies, Biology, Chemistry*, Physics*, General Science, Mathematics, Emotionally Impaired/ Behaviorally Disordered (major only), Learning Disabilities (major only), Early Childhood**, Health Education*

* Minor only

** Is an additional endorsement on an elementary certificate.

 

Teacher Certification Required Courses–Elementary
Note: Teacher education students are expected to have passed all of the Michigan Basic Skills tests (reading, mathematics, and writing) within the first two semesters of enrollment in teacher education.

EDU 401

Introduction to Elementary Education
(Must be completed within the first two semesters of enrollment in Teacher Education)

2 cr.

EDU 432 (with Lab)

Psychology of Education
(Pre or co-requisite: EDU 401.
Prerequisite for all methods courses: 441, 442, 443, 448, 449)

3 cr.

EDU 420

Philosophy of Education

3 cr.

EDU 440

School and Society

3 cr.

SED 460

Mainstreaming and Education of Exceptional Persons

3 cr.

EDU 459

Instructional Technology

3 cr.

EDU 441

Methods and Materials of Instruction for Social Studies in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

2 cr.

EDU 442

Methods and Materials of Instruction for Science in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite:EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

2 cr.

EDU 443

Teaching Reading in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

3 cr.

EDU 448

Methods and Materials of Instruction for Reading and Language Arts in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

3 cr.

EDU 449

Methods and Materials of Instruction for Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

2 cr.

EDU 459

Instructional Technology
(Prerequisite: CIS 100 or equivalent course, or demonstration of skills)

3 cr.

EDU 489

Directed teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools

8 cr.

All Education coursework must be completed before doing student teaching.

* See current Teacher Certification Handbook for requirements.

 

Waldorf Elementary Teacher Education Program

E-mail: willialg@udmercy.edu

The Waldorf Education Teacher Certification Program was inaugurated between the Waldorf Institute and Mercy College of Detroit in 1966. Subsequent to the consolidation which created the University of Detroit Mercy, the Waldorf Teacher Education Program was re-approved by the Michigan Board of Education in 1993.

The College of Education and Human Services offers a joint program of study leading toward a Bachelor of Arts degree with Michigan Elementary Teacher Certification in Waldorf Education as well as a post degree program for graduates with a certifiable major and minor.

Waldorf Education is based on the conviction that education must engage and nourish the whole child in body, mind and spirit. To that end, the course of study (in addition to the courses in Waldorf methods) includes a concentration on artistic activities and an introduction to Rudolf Steiner’s philosophical perspective known as anthroposophy.

The Bachelor of Arts degree with Michigan Elementary Teacher Certification can be earned by completing two years of full-time study with the Waldorf Teacher Development Association and a concurrent or additional year of full-time study at the University of Detroit Mercy. Another year may be required to complete all Michigan teacher certification requirements.

In conjunction with the Waldorf Teacher Education Program, Michigan teacher certification at the elementary level is available to post degree students (with a certifiable major/minor).

 

Admission Criteria/Procedures
Application for admission may be obtained through an interview at the College of Education and Human Services with Linda Williams, (313) 993-6323.

Requirements
The following courses constitute the Waldorf Teacher Education Program:

EDU 335

Child Development and Learning

3 cr.

EDU 327

Waldorf Curriculum Development

2 cr.

EDU 303

Cultural History for Waldorf Education

4 cr.

EDU 302

Fundamentals of Human Development

2 cr.

EDU 440

School and Society

3 cr.

EDU 459

Instructional Technology

3 cr.

SED 460

Education and Mainstreaming of Exceptional Persons

3 cr.

EDU 443

Teaching Reading in the Elementary and Middle Schools

3 cr.

EDU 329

Waldorf Methods of Teaching Language Arts

3 cr.

EDU 325

Waldorf Methods of Teaching Science

2 cr.

EDU 326

Waldorf Methods of Teaching Social Studies

2 cr.

EDU 322

Waldorf Methods of Teaching Mathematics

2 cr.

EDU 301

Humanity and Nature: The Study of Man

3 cr.

EDU 484

Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools I

4 cr.

EDU 458

Student Teaching in a Waldorf School

4 cr.

Secondary Education
Students preparing to teach in secondary schools may complete the requirements for a teaching certificate in connection with their degree programs in the College of Liberal Arts or the College of Engineering and Science. The requirements for a secondary school teaching certificate include completion of a teaching major and teaching minor in an academic subject area appropriate to the secondary school and the professional education sequence. In most instances, the degree major constitutes the teaching major.

Students in the secondary teacher education program are assigned an Education advisor in the College of Education and Human Services upon admission to the teacher certification program to plan the completion of the teaching major, the teaching minor and the education sequence of courses.

 

Teaching Majors and Minors
A teaching major consists of not less than 30 semester hours in a single discipline or 36 semester hours in a group of disciplines. A teaching minor consists of not less than 20 semester hours in a single discipline or not less than 24 semester hours in a group of disciplines. The department reserves the right to require specific courses in the major and minor.

The following teaching majors and minors are approved by the State Board of Education for Secondary Certification: English, Communications (Speech), Economics, History, Political Science, Psychology*, Sociology*, Social Studies, Biology, Chemistry, Physics, General Science, Mathematics, Business Education*, Computer Science, Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered (major only), Learning Disabled (major only), Health Education*

* Minor only

 

Teacher Certification Required Courses–Secondary
Note: Teacher education students are expected to have passed all of the Michigan Basic Skills tests (reading, mathematics and writing) within the first two semesters of enrollment in teacher education.

Students planning to become certified to teach in secondary schools must complete 34 semester credit hours in the following sequence of Education courses.

EDU 402

Introduction to Secondary Education
(Must be completed within the first two semesters of enrollment in a Teacher Education Program)

2 cr.

EDU 432
(with Lab)

Psychology of Education
(Pre or co-requisite: EDU 402. Prerequisite for all methods courses: 478, 469, 471, 473, 474)

3 cr.

EDU 420

Psychology of Education

3 cr.

EDU 440

School and Society

3 cr.

SED 460

Mainstreaming and Education of Exceptional Persons

3 cr.

EDU 459

Instructional Technology
(Prerequisite: CIS 100 or equivalent course, or demonstration of skills)

3 cr.

EDU 478

Teaching Reading in the Content Areas
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

2 cr.

EDU 469

Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools I
(Prerequisite: EDU 432. This course is a prerequisite for EDU 471, 473, 474, 475. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

2 cr.

One of the following:

EDU 471

Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Mathematics
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

3 cr.

EDU 473

Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Social Studies
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

3 cr.

EDU 474

Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Communication Arts
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)

3 cr.

EDU 475

Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Science
(Prerequisite: EDU 432, EDU 469. Must be admitted into Teacher Certification Program*)
AND

3 cr.

EDU 490

Directed Teaching in the Secondary Schools
(All Education coursework must be completed before doing student teaching)

8 cr.

* See current Teacher Certification Handbook for requirements

Post Degree Certification
Post-degree students may prepare for an elementary or secondary teaching certificate in the College of Education and Human Services. The requirements are the same as for elementary education and secondary education. See above.

In addition, students pursuing elementary education are required to fulfill the following general studies requirements:

English Writing

3 cr.

Speech

3 cr.

Literature

3 cr.

Computer Science

3 cr.

Math for Elementary Teachers

6 cr.

General Science

6 cr.

Developmental Psychology

3 cr.

Multicultural Understanding

3 cr.

Humanities

6 cr.

Social Studies

6 cr.

Social Responsibility

6 cr.

Humanities: Art, Music, or Drama

3 cr.

Students pursuing secondary education are required to have fulfilled the following general studies requirements:

English Writing

3 cr.

Speech

3 cr.

Computer Science

3 cr.

Intermediate Algebra

3 cr.

Science

3 cr.

Developmental Psychology

3 cr.

Multicultural Understanding

3 cr.

Humanities

9 cr.

Social Science

9 cr.

Social Responsibility

6 cr.

 

Special Education

Learning Disabilities, Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered

Office: Manning Hall 414, Outer Drive Campus
Faculty: J. Gambini
Telephone: (313) 993-6100
E-mail:
gambinjm@udmercy.edu

The College of Education and Human Services offers two programs leading to certification in Special Education–Learning Disabilities and Emotionally Impaired/ Behaviorally Disordered. Learning Disabilities is a field of Special Education which deals with children who have average or above average intelligence but who are not able to learn in conventional ways. The Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered is a field of Special Education which deals with children who have average or above average intelligence but who are unable to learn or to function due to emotional problems. Students completing the requirements for either program earn a Bachelor of Science in Education (B.S.Ed.) degree.

 

Special Education Program
Students majoring in the field are recommended for an elementary provisional certificate or a secondary provisional certificate. The special education major qualifies students to teach the special education category from kindergarten to grade 12. Additionally, the state elementary provisional certificate is valid for teaching all subjects in grades kindergarten to and including grade 5, for teaching the subject areas of the major or minor in grades 6 through 8. The state secondary provisional certificate is valid for teaching in subject areas in grades 7 to and including grade 12 in which the applicant has completed a major or minor.

 

Requirements
Course requirements for major programs in special education learning disabilities and emotionally impaired/behaviorally disordered are distributed as follows:

University Core Curriculum as Specified

Professional Education Core (36 cr. minimum)
Students planning to become certified to teach in learning disabilities or the emotionally impaired/behaviorally disordered must complete a minimum of 36 semester credit hours of coursework which include educational foundations, teaching methodology including instructional technology, reading instruction, special education, classroom observation and participation, and student teaching.

Teaching Minor (20-24 cr.)
Minors are chosen from those listed under elementary education program.

Learning Disabilities Major (36 cr.)

EDU 431

School and Classroom Management

3 cr.

PYC 250

Developmental Psychology

3 cr.

PYC 440

Cross-Cultural Socialization

3 cr.

SED 357

Special Education Field Experience

3 cr.

SED 370

Introduction to Special Education: Learning Disabilities

3 cr.

SED 371

Curriculum and Instruction: Learning Disabilities

3 cr.

SED 412

Special Education in the Secondary Schools

3 cr.

SED 453

Assessment in Special Education

3 cr.

SED 467

Strategies for Teaching Mathematics and Language Arts to the Learning Disabled

3 cr.

SED 486

Educating Diverse and Special Populations in the Inclusionary Setting

3 cr.

SED 474

Directed Student Teaching: Special Education Learning Disabilities

6 cr.

Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered Major (39 cr.)

EDU 431

School and Classroom Management

3 cr.

PYC 250

Developmental Psychology

3 cr.

PYC 342

Abnormal Psychology

3 cr.

PYC 440

Cross-Cultural Socialization

3 cr.

SED 357

Special Education Field Experience

3 cr.

SED 380

Introduction to Special Education: Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered

3 cr.

SED 384

Curriculum and Instruction: Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered

3 cr.

SED 412

Special Education in the Secondary Schools

3 cr.

SED 453

Assessment in Special Education

3 cr.

SED 482

Educating Severely Emotionally Impaired/Behaviorally Disordered and Autistic Students

3 cr.

SED 484

Directed Student Teaching: Special Education Emotionally Impaired

6 cr.

SED 486

Educating Diverse and Special Populations in the Inclusionary Setting

3 cr.

 

Certificate in Business Administration
The College of Education and Human Services and the College of Business Administration offer a joint undergraduate degree designated as a bachelor’s degree with a Certificate in Business Administration. Students interested in the joint degree program will elect a major in the College of Education and Human Services while taking 30 hours of selected course work in the College of Business Administration and completing the University core requirements. Upon completion of all requirements, the student receives a Bachelor of Science degree in the chosen major from the College of Education and Human Services with a certificate from the College of Business Administration.

Major Program

36 cr.

Certificate in B.A

30 cr.

University Core Curriculum

42 cr.

Electives

18 cr.

The student must register in the College of Education and Human Services and select a major. As soon as possible, but no later than the beginning of the first term of the junior year, the student must officially enter the joint B.S. or B.A./Certificate in Business. At least 18 of the 30 required hours must be taken in residence at University of Detroit Mercy. Students accepted into this program may not take more than 30 hours of course work in business (See page 18).

All students who wish to enter the B.S. or B.A./Certificate in Business program must satisfy the course prerequisites for the required courses as stated in the Undergraduate Catalog.