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Economics

ECN 100. 3 cr.
Introduction to Economics

An introduction to economic way of thinking covering a survey of micro and macro economics including basic data sources.

ECN 137. 3 cr.
World Economic Geography
A study focusing on economic activity at the local, national and world levels, including developing nations as well as the geography of highly developed economies such as the United States and Canada. Geographic study of economic organizations and their classification with respect to resource endowment and utilization. Production, distribution and consumption of selected commodities, representing the use of resources in the framework of evolving and existing technology and culture.

ECN 295. 3 cr.
Microeconomic Principles
Study of the scope and method of economics. The course focuses on: the allocation of resources and economic efficiency, demand, supply, and the price system, competition and monopoly, the pricing of factor services, and the distribution of income.

ECN 296. 3 cr.
Macroeconomic Principles
Study of the scope and method of economics. Course topics may include: measures and determinants of the level of aggregate income, employment, and economic development; monetary institutions and the money supply; monetary policy; taxes; government borrowing; expenditures; fiscal policy; international trade; alternative systems of economic organization.

ECN 305. 3 cr.
Money and the Financial System
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and ECN 296.
Introduction to international financial system, balance of payments, exchange rates and external currency markets. Course topics may include: the nature and economic role of money and credit, financial intermediation and its control by monetary authority, financial markets, institutions, and instruments, interest rate theory, level and term structure, yield curve strategies, control of monetary aggregates and their relationship to employment and prices, and controversies in monetary policy.

ECN 315. 3 cr.
Intermediate Microeconomics
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
An extension and elaboration of elementary price and allocation theory with emphasis on techniques and methods of analysis. Covers such topics as: the principle of optimization, consumer behavior and the firm, market structure and function, factor markets, and programming and activity analysis.

ECN 316. 3 cr.
Intermediate Macroeconomics
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
An extension and elaboration of elementary aggregate income and employment analysis. Focuses on: aggregate income and product accounts, aggregate demand, supply and general static equilibrium of the product and money markets, growth and instability in economic activity, stabilization policies, and simple dynamic models of growth.

ECN 344. 3 cr.
International Economics
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and ECN 296.
A survey course of international trade and international finance. Class discusses problems such as tariffs, quotas, balance of payments, exchange rate systems.

ECN 347. 3 cr.
Economic Development
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and ECN 296.
An explanation of alternative parts of growth for underdeveloped countries. Focuses on: meaning, measurement and theories of development; factors, government policies and welfare issues in economic development; a critique of current development policies.

ECN 348. 3 cr.
Business Forecasting
Prerequisites: ECN 316 and statistics.
Introduction to the techniques of business forecasting. Class examines short run models and aggregate forecasts for major sectors of the economy, applications to particular industries, and long run predictions.

ECN 355. 3 cr.
History of Economic Thought

Prerequisites: 295 and 296.
A survey of the development of economic analysis and interpretation. Covers: ancient and medieval probing, mercantilism and Physiocratic foundations, classical economics, socialist criticism, Austrian subjectivism and marginalism, neoclassical synthesis, general equilibrium analysis, and the Keynesian contribution.

ECN 358. 3 cr.
Money and Capital Markets
Prerequisite: ECN 305.
A study of the U.S. financial system using a flow-of-funds approach. Class analyzes the nature and role of all financial institutions and markets and the policies of the Federal Reserve and Treasury operations.

ECN 376. 3 cr.
Monetary and Fiscal Policy
Prerequisites: ECN 296, ECN 305 or consent of instructor.
An analysis of the impacts of monetary and fiscal policies on output, employment, prices, balance of payments and economic growth. Also covers structural, allocational and political constraints.

ECN 385. 3 cr.
Comparative Economic Systems
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
A study and evaluation of the most typical institutions and practices employed in free enterprise, libertarian socialist, communist, and fascist economic systems. Deals with fundamental economic problems, such as choices between goals, the allocation of resources, the maintenance of full and stable employment and production, capital accumulation, technological advancement, income distribution, and consumer welfare.

ECN 395. 3 cr.
Directed Reading and Research in Economics
Prerequisites: ECN 315 and 316 and quality-point average of at least 2.60 in economic courses; open to students in their senior year with written approval of faculty supervisor and department chairman.
Reading and research in economics in an area elected by the student and supervised by a faculty member of the students choice. The reading and research program must be presented in writing by the student and his/her faculty supervisor to the department chair for approval within two weeks after the first day of classes in the term.

ECN 410. 3 cr.
Mathematics for Economists
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
Examines the following: sets, the axioms of algebra, equations, functions, and series; compound interest; the fundamentals of differential and integral calculus; the elements of linear algebra and linear programming; the structure and reduction of mathematical models in economics; linear algebra and the calculus of variations; differential and difference equations; linear and non-linear optimization models; dynamic economic models and stability conditions.

ECN 415. 3 cr.
Econometrics I
Prerequisites: ECN 316 and Statistics.
Examines the following topics: ordinary least squares, multi-collinearity, dummy variables, specification error, auto-correlation and the Durbin-Watson test, the heleroscedaticity problem, and the distribution lag model.

ECN 420. 3 cr.
Labor Economics
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
Examines the following topics: determinants of the demand for and supply of labor; the changing labor force; time-allocation models; wage structure; occupational, industrial and geographical wage differentials; the wage-price unemployment problem; the impact of unionism; the implications of wage-price policies; structural unemployment; the problems of maintaining full employment.

ECN 430. 3 cr.
Performance of U.S. Industry
Prerequisites: ECN 295 or consent of instructor.
An application of microeconomic theory to the analysis of market structure, conduct and performance of American industries. Examines topics such as: size and efficiency of firms, competitive behavior and entry, product differentiation and advertising, integration and merger, the behavior of conglomerates, market power, coordination and administered prices, innovation, technological development and investment, impact on resource allocation, consumer satisfaction, and income distribution.

ECN 435. 3 cr.
The Economic History of the United States
A survey of the economic development of the United States. Course topics include: the geographical setting, the economy of the colonial period, the impact of political independence and the industrial revolution, the development of monetary and financial institutions, capital accumulation, advancement in technology and business organization, the growth of large scale production, the labor movement, business concentration, instability, the growing economic role of government, and contemporary trends and problems in their historic context.

ECN 440. 3 cr.
Economics of the Public Sector
Prerequisite: ECN 295.
Examination of the role of the public sector in a market oriented economy. Course topics include: efficiency criteria in public decision-making; budgeting; setting priorities; economic analysis of the incidence and economic effects, particularly on resource allocation and income distribution; problems of intergovernmental relations.

ECN 445. 3 cr.
Foundations of Free Enterprise and Radical Criticism
Seminar on such issues as alienation, worker control of business, private property, political power and economic decision making. Emphasis is on faculty papers, student essays and small group interaction. (Honors only or consent of Economics chair.)

ECN 451. 3 cr.
Urban Regional Economics and Planning
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
Application of economic analysis to urban goals, problems and interactions. Course topics may include: growth, income levels, income distribution, and stability in urban economy; employment, poverty, and local finance; transportation, housing, and land use; interactions and opportunity cost of goals; problems and solution in terms of labor markets; the price system; multipliers, and industrial and occupational mix; interrelationships of physical planning and financial and socioeconomic constraints; patterns of governmental support for urban renewal and development.

ECN 455. 3 cr.
The Economics of Regulation
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
Examination of the economics of legal and social rationale of regulation. Course topics may include: public utilities and the regulation of the rate level, rate basis and structure, the economic principles of ratemaking, the expansion of regulation to quasi-utilities, regulation with respect to product quality and performance, regulatory agencies, and policy recommendations.

ECN 460. 3 cr.
Economic History of Europe
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296 or consent of instructor.
A study of the evolution of economic institutions, organizations, problems and policies in modern and contemporary Europe. Course topics may include: the development of market economies, mercantilism, the Industrial Revolution, the rise and decline of laissez-faire, the labor movement, the economic impact of the two world wars, the growing economic role of governments, totalitarian governments, state capitalism, central planning, and economic integration.

ECN 465. 3 cr.
Economics of International Trade
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and ECN 296.
A study of the foundation, advantages, and problems of international specialization and trade. Course topics may include: the rise of the multinational firm, absolute and comparative advantage, differences in cost and price relations among countries, foreign exchange rates, the terms of trade and trade balances, international cartels and commodity agreements, import quotas and bilateral agreements, tariffs, and relations between domestic and international economic policies.

ECN 466. 3 cr.
International Finance
Prerequisites: ECN 305 or consent of instructor.
An analysis of the monetary and financial framework of international trade. Course topics may include: international payments methods and money markets; fluctuations in foreign exchange rates, devaluation, and exchange control; capital movements, international borrowing, and debt; balance of payments problems and gold flows; the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank; plans for international monetary reform.

ECN 470. 2-4 cr.
Special Problems in Economics
Prerequisites: ECN 315 and 316 or consent of instructor.
An intensive study of some special problems in economics, directed by members of the regular faculty or visiting professors.

ECN 475. 3 cr.
Natural Resource Economics
Prerequisites: ECN 295 and 296.
Examination of the distribution and explanation of natural resources. Focuses on the surpluses of food and energy, interrelationships between third world and developed nations, and geopolitical considerations.

 

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Education

EDU 235. 3 cr.
Child Development and Learning
Growth and development of the child from birth through adolescence; implications for professionals concerning the physical, emotional, social and intellectual development of the child; planned observation in varied group settings.

EDU 256. 3 cr.
Early Childhood Curriculum I
Prerequisite: PYC 234 and evidence of a negative TB test.
Curriculum design for the child development setting with special focus on guiding the physical, socio-emotional, and creative development of young children; supervised field experience.

EDU 257. 3 cr.
Early Childhood Curriculum II
Prerequisite: PYC 234 and evidence of State-required physical health form.
Curriculum design for the child development setting with special focus on guiding the cognitive and language development of young children; supervised field experience.

EDU 301. 3 cr.
Humanity and Nature: The Study of Man
Prerequisite: Waldorf students.
A study of the basic relationship between humanity and the other kingdoms of nature. Themes include the concept of the human being; the interaction of body, soul and spirit; morphological similarities and differences between animals and human beings; the physical, psychological and spiritual nature of the human being.

EDU 302. 2 cr.
Fundamentals of Human Development
Prerequisite: Waldorf students.
Fundamentals of human physiological and psychological development from birth to death, with special emphasis on the first 21 years and the role of cognition, feeling and will in the human psyche. Increased awareness of the shared patterns of human biography and uniquely individual process through these phases. Practical ways to support individual development into the future.

EDU 303. 4 cr.
Cultural History for Waldorf Education
Prerequisite: Waldorf students.
Rudolf Steiner’s view of the human being and his or her relation to the process of world evolution. Includes a survey of the development of humanity from prehistoric times to the present, with emphasis on transition periods and changes in the evolution of consciousness.

EDU 322. 2 cr.
Waldorf Methods of Teaching Mathematics
Prerequisite: EDU 327.
Methodology and content of the Waldorf mathematics curriculum. Quantitative/qualitative aspects in the introduction of number concepts and the four processes. Fundamental operations with integers, fractions, decimals. Elementary geometry and algebra.

EDU 325. 2 cr.
Waldorf Methods of Teaching Science
Prerequisite: EDU 327.
Waldorf methods of teaching the sciences: life sciences, with an emphasis on zoology and botany; introduction to physics and chemistry treated phenomenologically; and the observational study of astronomy. Mineralogy and physiology will also be discussed.

EDU 326. 2 cr.
Waldorf Methods of Teaching Social Studies
Prerequisite: EDU 327.
Waldorf methods of teaching history and geography in grades 4 through 8. The role of biography in history and of contrast and polarities in geography.

EDU 327. 2 cr.
Waldorf Curriculum Development
Prerequisite: Waldorf students.
An outline of the Waldorf Curriculum from Early Childhood through High School, with primary emphasis on the Elementary and Middle School years. A study of the relationship of the curriculum with maturation and development. Also an examination of the goals and objectives for various disciplines of knowledge which comprise the curriculum. Structure of the lesson and of the day, week and year in light of curricular goals and the nature of the child.

EDU 329. 3 cr.
Waldorf Methods of Teaching Reading and Language Arts
Prerequisite: EDU 327.
Key concepts of the Waldorf developmental approach to reading and writing: introduction of letters through story, image and verse; the development of writing through movement and drawing (from design); the art of storytelling; the grammar curriculum; integration with content-area curriculum. Waldorf in relation to Language Experience and Whole Language and phonics instruction.

EDU 335. 3 cr.
Child Development and Learning
Prerequisite: Waldorf students.
Principles of teaching related to growth and developmental stages of childhood and adolescence. This course links Rudolf Steiner’s psychology of child development with Waldorf classroom practice. Emphasis is on balanced cognitive, affective and physical development through the various stages of childhood, in keeping with the changing nature of the child’s consciousness.

EDU 398. 1-3 cr.
Directed Readings
Prerequisite: Senior standing, permission of instructor, and permission of dean.
Student works independently on a field problem or research program in consultation with an instructor.

EDU 401. 2 cr.
Introduction to Elementary Education
Provides a field research experience of the teaching profession through teaching activities, relevant research and inquiry. Thirty hours of field experience in an elementary school is mandatory and forms the core of this course. Students gain "first hand" classroom experience to clarify career goals and aspirations, as well as to provide an action learning opportunity to integrate the UDM teacher education framework of Teacher as Scholar, Inquiring Educator and Moral Agent.

EDU 402. 2 cr.
Introduction to Secondary Education
Provides a field research experience of the teaching profession through teaching activities, relevant research and inquiry. Thirty hours of field experience in a secondary school is mandatory and forms the core of this course. Students gain "first hand" classroom experience to clarify career goals and aspirations, as well as an action learning opportunity, to integrate the UDM teacher education framework of Teacher as Scholar, Inquiring Educator and Moral Agent.

EDU 403. 3 cr.
Internship in Early Childhood Education
Supervised field experience of 14 weeks, half days, or seven weeks, full days, in a developmentally appropriate early childhood setting. Campus seminar included.

EDU 407. 3 cr.
Children’s Literature
A study of recent trends in children’s literature with an examination of several books currently being read by children. Recommended for students in elementary education.

EDU 420. 3 cr.
Philosophy of Education
Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of dean.
Relates contemporary theories of education with philosophical and historical starting points as well as ethical implications for educational practice. Applies the UDM Teacher Candidates’ Code of Professional Ethics. Engages students in professional scholarly inquiry on the issues and alternatives to consider as one articulates a personal philosophy of education.

EDU 421. 3 cr.
Values and Moral Development in the Educational Process
Curriculum and methods of teaching values and moral education in grades K-12. A critical review of major contemporary trends, problems, and issues in public and private schools regarding the roles and function of value teaching. Designed to provide the student with the necessary skills and understanding required to plan and develop an effective curriculum and methodology in values education.

EDU 423. 3 cr.
Curriculum and Methods of Teaching Early Childhood Education
Basic principles involved in the development of curriculum for children from infancy through age eight, with specific emphasis on the preschool/kindergarten years. Students learn developmentally appropriate activity-based curriculum adaptation strategies for working with all children and their families to guide their cognitive, socio-emotional, creative and physical development. Strategies for adopting methods and materials for children with special needs.

EDU 431. 3 cr.
Classroom Management
Humanistic principles and strategies for dealing with classroom behavior. Major topics include the causes and prevention of disruptive behavior, positive corrective measures, reinforcement, punishment and the principles of logical consequences.

EDU 432. 3 cr.
Psychology of Education
Pre- or Co-requisite: EDU 401/402.
Application of psychological theories and research findings to the field of education and teaching. Major topics include nature and direction of the learning process, cultural influences on learning, evaluation/measurement methods, learning styles, motivation, discipline, dimensions of student mental health, intelligence, critical and creative thinking and the principles of human development (infancy through adulthood). Thirty-two hours of supervised clinical experience in a tutorial lab stressing development of diagnostic skills, curriculum planning, instruction and management skills.

EDU 433. 3 cr.
Education Principles of Growth and Development
Comprehensive overview of motor, perceptual, language, cognitive, physical, social, moral, emotional and personality development from infancy to senescence. Intelligence, thinking, self-esteem, self-identity, vocational goals, role identification, creativity, motivation and memory are studied. Culture, heredity and the effect of the environment on development are examined, as well as the critical points of each stage of development.

EDU 437. 3 cr.
Mediated Learning Experience
The mediated approach to teaching and learning are introduced. This course covers Reuven Feuerstein’s Structural Cognitive Modifiability which states that all humans can be taught how to learn more efficiently. Students will be guided as they begin to bridge the mediated approach to learning to content methods.

EDU 438. 3 cr.
The Cognitive Enrichment Network (COGNET)
Introduces students to the COGNET System used to guide elementary and preschool children to become more effective learners and thinkers. This approach uses health care networking, technology and the inquiry approach to help children develop. A program for teachers to use with parents and other caregivers will also be provided. Course utilizes a systems approach to school change.

EDU 439. 3 cr.
Feuerstein’s Instrumental Enrichment I
Prerequisite: EDU 437.
Provides students with an on-going experience in Mediated Learning through the use of Instrumental Enrichment. This program is meant to be used with grades 4 to adults to teach students to be more effective learners. Students are taught to apply Mediated Learning to real world examples and academic content. Systems renewal and parent involvement are discussed.

EDU 440. 3 cr.
School and Society
Sociological implications for formal and informal as well as structured and unstructured education; analysis of the school as a specific social institution in society; the effects of social class, stratification, caste, role, status and peer group relationships in education. Topics include: educational finance, organization of schools and private education.

EDU 441. 2 cr.
Methods and Materials of Instruction for Science in Elementary and Middle Schools
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 401, 432 and 459.
Design of effective science instruction with a focus on National Science Teachers Association objectives and its integration into the curriculum through practical strategies, collaborative activities and technology. An interdisciplinary approach blending both science content areas and classroom applications will be utilized. Additional emphasis will be placed on research including a review and analysis of contemporary issues. Both classroom and field experiences are an integral part of this course.

EDU 442. 2 cr.
Methods and Materials of Instruction for Social Science in Elementary and Middle Schools
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 401, 432 and 459.
Design of effective social studies instruction with a focus on National Council of Social Studies goals and its integration into the curriculum through practical strategies, collaborative activities and technology. An interdisciplinary approach blending both social studies content and classroom applications are utilized. Additional emphasis is placed on research including a review and analysis of contemporary issues. Both classroom and field experiences are an integral part of this course.

EDU 443. 3 cr.
Teaching Reading in the Elementary and Middle Schools
Pre- or Co-requisite: MBST, EDU 401, EDU 432.
Current view of reading which emphasizes the constructive, interactive dynamic nature of the reading process. The theoretical and practical knowledge necessary for understanding the reading process is also emphasized. Planned observations in a school environment are required.

EDU 448. 3 cr.
Methods and Materials for Teaching Reading and the Language Arts
Prerequisite: EDU 443.
An integrated approach to teaching the language arts - speaking, listening, reading, writing and thinking - as a part of the total curriculum. The theoretical background and instructional strategies needed to implement a language arts program in which children are actively involved in thinking and communicating are emphasized. Planned observations in a school environment are required.

EDU 449. 2 cr.
Methods and Materials of Instruction for Mathematics in Elementary and Middle Schools
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 401, 432 and 459.
Design of effective mathematics instruction with a focus on National Council of Teachers of Mathematics standards and its integration into the curriculum through practical strategies, collaborative activities and technology. An interdisciplinary approach blending both mathematical content and classroom applications is utilized. Additional emphasis will be placed on research including a review and analysis of contemporary issues. Both classroom and field experiences are an integral part of this course.

EDU 458. 4 cr.
Student Teaching in a Waldorf School
Prerequisite: Waldorf program admission; Permission of instructor.
Student teaching and related activities five days per week in a Waldorf School under the supervision of the College of Education and faculty of the Waldorf School. Conferences will be scheduled throughout the term. (Note - this is a half-semester course; the other half of student teaching is done in a traditional public or private school. See listing for EDU 484.

EDU 459. 3 cr.
Instructional Technology
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 401 or EDU 402.
Introduction and exposure to technology and its uses in all phases of instruction with stress on realistic application in the classroom. Emphasis focuses on practical hands-on projects of such various instructional media as non-projected and projected visuals, computers, multimedia, distance learning, telecommunications and the Internet as well as the strategies and methodologies for their integration into the curriculum.

EDU 461. 3 cr.
Mathematics Concepts for Early Childhood Learning
The course is structured to aid teachers of young children to gain insights from Jean Piaget and Jerome Bruner in order to design learning experiences in mathematics for young children.

EDU 466. 3 cr.
Diagnosis and Remediation of Reading Disabilities
A survey of various diagnostic instruments and procedures for analyzing reading problems. Includes practical experience. Appropriate interventions will be prescribed.

EDU 469. 3 cr.
Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 402, 432, 459.
An introduction to curriculum and instructional methods at the secondary level to increase students’ repertoires of instructional strategies. The focus is on constructing lessons and units for use at middle and senior high school levels. Topics include: curriculum structure and content at the lesson and unit level; academic task structures; participant structures; methods of instruction; classroom leadership; lesson designs, assessment, evaluation and reporting of student progress. Students develop items for professional portfolios.

EDU 471. 3 cr.
Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Mathematics
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 402, 432, 469.
Objectives and curricular organization of secondary schools and of mathematics courses; content, sequence and methods to accomplish these objectives. Measurement, evaluation and reporting to parents. Preparation of plans with class demonstration.

EDU 473. 3 cr.
Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools: Social Studies
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 402, 432, 469.
Foundation of knowledge and skills to teach history, geography, economics, political science and social science courses at the middle and high school levels. Focus is on design, implementation, and evaluation of units/lessons with well-articulated outcomes, appropriate instructional strategies and relevant assessments. Topics include: communication of concepts; curricular organization of secondary social studies; resources for curriculum development and instruction; and critical examination of practice. Students continue development of professional portfolios.

EDU 474. 3 cr.
Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Communication Arts
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 402, 432, 469.
Objectives and curricular organization of secondary schools and of communication arts courses; content, sequence and methods to accomplish these objectives. Measurement, evaluation and reporting to parents. Preparation of plans with class demonstration.

EDU 475. 3 cr.
Curriculum and Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools II: Science
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 402, 432. 469.
Objectives and curricular organization of secondary schools and of science courses; content, sequence and methods to accomplish these objectives. Measurement, evaluation and reporting to parents. Preparation of plans with class demonstration.

EDU 476. 3 cr.
Developmentally Appropriate Early Childhood Assessment
An examination of issues and controversies surrounding assessment of young children. Emphasis is placed on the need to use multiple ways of gathering information which result in increased sensitivity to children’s developmental and classroom needs. The action research model is used to link observation and assessment to curriculum planning and instruction.

EDU 478. 3 cr.
Reading in the Content Areas
Prerequisite: MBST, EDU 402, 432.
Emphasizes techniques and approaches for teaching reading within the content area. Designed for elementary and secondary teachers, reading specialist and school administrators. Topics include formal and informal assessment procedures, the identification of basic skills of critical importance to content study and the development of effective organizational techniques for meeting a variety of reading abilities in the classroom.

EDU 479. 3 cr.
Diagnostic-Prescriptive Reading for the Elementary Grades
Focuses upon the diagnostic-prescriptive methods and techniques of reading instruction in the elementary grades. Emphasis is given to criterion-based evaluation and lesson development. Approaches to the teaching of reading in the content areas at the elementary level are also covered.

EDU 481. 3 cr.
Early Childhood Administration
Organizing and administering child development programs, including licensing, budgeting, and record-keeping; staffing, scheduling and curriculum; approaches to working with staff, parents and the community, including safety and nutrition.

EDU 482. 6 cr.
Directed Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools
Prerequisite: MBST methods courses.
Fifteen weeks – five full days per week of teaching and related activities in an elementary-middle school setting. Supervision is provided by a school district teacher and a University staff person. Seminars will discuss and clarify the student teaching experience – bring clarity between theory and practice. For Special Education majors.

EDU 483. 6 cr.
Directed Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools
Prerequisite: MBST methods courses.
Fifteen weeks – five full days per week of teaching and related activities in a middle-secondary school setting. Supervision is provided by a school district teacher and a University staff person. Seminars will discuss and clarify the student teaching experience – bring clarity between theory and practice. For Special Education majors.

EDU 484. 4 cr.
Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools I
Prerequisite: MBST and methods courses. A part-time placement.
Teaching and related activities five half-days per week in a school in the Detroit area under the supervision of the College of Education and faculty of the particular school. Conferences will be scheduled throughout the term.

EDU 485. 4 cr.
Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools II
Continuation of EDU 484.

EDU 486. 3 cr.
Young Children in Peril: Educational Implications
Critical examination of some of the difficult conditions that many children and their families are confronting today and the impact of these conditions on children’s development and learning. Conditions that include poverty, homelessness, child abuse, family violence, neglect, separation or divorce, substance abuse and AIDS are explored. Effective child advocacy and educational interventions are developed sensitive to the ethnic, racial, cultural and socio-economic diversity of the child.

EDU 487. 4 cr.
Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools I
Prerequisite: MBST and methods courses.
Teaching and related activities five half-days per week in a school in the Detroit area under the supervision of the College of Education and faculty of the particular school. Conferences will be scheduled throughout the term.

EDU 488. 4 cr.
Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools II
Continuation of EDU 487.

EDU 489. 8 cr.
Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools
Prerequisite: MBST; methods courses.
Teaching and related activities five days per week in an elementary school under the supervision of the classroom teacher and University supervisor. 15 weeks. Seminars and conferences.

EDU 490. 8 cr.
Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools
Prerequisite: MBST; methods courses.
Teaching and related activities five days per week in a secondary school under the supervision of the classroom teacher and University supervisor. 15 weeks. Seminars and conferences.

EDU 491. 9 cr.
Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools
Prerequisite: MBST; methods courses.
Teaching and related activities five days per week in an elementary school under the supervision of the classroom teacher and University supervisor. 15 weeks. Seminars and conferences.

EDU 492. 9 cr.
Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools
Prerequisite: MBST; methods courses.
Teaching and related activities five days per week in a secondary school under the supervision of the classroom teacher and University supervisor. 15 weeks. Seminars and conferences.

EDU 493. 10 cr.
Student Teaching in the Elementary and Middle Schools
Prerequisite: MBST; methods courses.
Teaching and related activities five days per week in an elementary school under the supervision of the classroom teacher and University supervisor. 15 weeks. Seminars and conferences.

EDU 494. 10 cr.
Student Teaching in the Secondary Schools
Prerequisite: MBST; methods courses.
Teaching and related activities five days per week in a secondary school under the supervision of the classroom teacher and University supervisor. 15 weeks. Seminars and conferences.

EDU 495. 3 cr.
Issues in Early Childhood Education
An intensive study of selected contemporary issues in early childhood education which affect educational decisions in curriculum, methods and general school policy. Historical, sociological and philosophic aspects are examined.

EDU 498. 3 cr.
Creative Techniques of Teaching
A practical discussion of the methods and techniques to be used by the classroom teacher to enhance his/her creative teaching. Topics include: the creative process, creative thinking, creative classroom environment, characteristics of the creative teacher, curriculum and methods of creative teaching.

EDU 499. 1-3 cr.
Independent Study with permission of instructor.

 

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Electronic Critique

ECR 491. 3 Cr.
E-Crit Design Laboratory
Based in a multimedia computer laboratory, the E-Crit Design Lab engages students in the practices and theories of "Digital Culture" by emphasizing a critical approach to technology. Students study theoretical approaches to new media and apply their own critiques in Web projects, digital audio and video, and multimedia presentations. The Design Lab is the organizational and symbolic center of the E-Crit Program, and it provides majors with an ongoing focus and collaborative sensibility. This course may be repeated for up to 12 credits.

ECR 495. 3 cr.
Digital Culture Project
Prerequisite: Departmental Permission Form.
These projects are directed on an individual or group basis, and they should combine disciplinary knowledge with "real-world" experience. Students are advised to integrate a service component into their projects. This course may be repeated for up to 12 credits.

ECR 499. 3 cr.
Digital Media Portfolio
Prerequisite: ECR 491 (4 sections) or permission of program director.
In order to graduate from the E-Crit Program, students must assemble a Media Portfolio for delivery on the Web, CD-ROM, etc., which includes a student’s C.V. and samples of work completed while enrolled in the Program. The portfolio is intended to prepare students for entry into the job market or graduate school. Portfolios are reviewed by the E-Crit Advisory Board.

 

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Electrical Engineering

Explanation of course cr.: (2-3-0) indicates 2 credit hours, 3 contact hours in class and 0 contact hours in laboratory per week.

EE 350. 3-3-0
Network Theory I
Co-requisite: PHY 162, MTH 372.
Electrical circuit elements, network theorems, techniques of circuit analysis and design: transient and steady-state responses of RC, RL, and RLC circuits.

EE 352. 3-3-0
Network Theory II
Prerequisite: EE 350.
Steady-state analysis and design of single and three phase circuits, resonant circuits, filters. Laplace and Fourier techniques, analysis and design of two-port networks.

EE 356. 3-3-0
Electronics I
Co-requisite: EE 352.
Study of the underlying physical behavior of semiconductor devices, circuit modelling of active devices. Analysis and design of diode and transistor circuits: power supplies, basic amplifier configurations, bias and stability analysis, multi-stage amplifiers.

EE 358. 3-3-0
Electronics II
Prerequisite: EE 356.
Analysis and design of power amplifiers, differential and operational amplifiers. Frequency response of amplifiers and analysis of electronic feedback circuits.

EE 361. 2-1-3
Circuits Laboratory
Co-requisite: EE 352.
Introduction to electrical instrumentation, measurement of voltage, current and transient response of RLC circuits, design and testing of RLC circuits; AC circuits, measurement of frequency response of networks; design and testing of filter circuits.

EE 363. 2-1-3
Electronics Laboratory
Co-requisite: EE 358.
Measurement of diode and transistor characteristics, design, simulation and testing of diode circuits, single and multiple stages amplifiers, power amplifiers, differential amplifiers and operational amplifier circuits.

EE 364. 3-3-0
Digital Logic Circuits I
Sophomore Standing.
Binary numbers and arithmetic. Fundamentals of Boolean algebra. Basic logic circuit concepts. Karnaugh maps. Multiplexers, decoders, flip-flops, counters, PLDs and FPGAs. Design of sequential circuits, computer modeling and simulation of digital systems.

EE 365. 1-0-3
Digital Logic Circuits Laboratory
Co-requisite: EE 364.
Design and implementation of combinational and sequential logic circuits including counters, adders, shift registers, etc. Computer simulation of logic circuits.

EE 366. 3-3-0
Electromagnetics I
Prerequisite: MTH 241 and PHY 162.
Vector analysis, electrostatics, conductor and dielectric, magnetostatics, magnetic materials, boundary conditions and boundary value problems, Maxwell’s equations.

EE 368. 3-3-0
Solid State I
Prerequisites: MTH 372 and PHY 364.
Introduction to the physical principles of modern semiconductor devices. Quantum mechanical descriptions of energy bands and conduction processes in n and p type semiconductors. Physics of equilibrium and biased p-n junctions. Effects of junction capacitance.

EE 372. 3-3-0
Electromechanical Energy Conversion
Prerequisite: EE 352, EE 366.
Analysis and design of magnetic circuits, transformers, induction motors, synchronous motors and generators, DC motors and generators.

EE 374. 3-3-0
Communication Theory I
Prerequisite: MTH 451.
Mathematical representation of signals, Fourier transforms. Power spectra, auto-correlation, transmission through linear systems, sampling theory, modulation theory. Analysis and design of modulation systems: amplitude modulation, angle modulation, and pulse modulation.

EE 401. 2-3-0
Electrical Design I
Prerequisites: EE 358, EE 364, ENL 303.
A capstone design course which integrates materials from all areas of Electrical Engineering. This course provides an engineering design experience comparable to that encountered in industry. Students have an opportunity to participate in a creative and realistic design effort requiring written, oral, and visual communication skills, as well as teamwork and planning. The course lectures present discussions on design methodology, designing for mass production, reliability, safety, and ethics among others. A literature search, detailed feasibility study, and an initial design are undertaken.

EE 403. 3-3-0
Electrical Design II
Prerequisite: EE 401.
Continuation of EE 401 requiring a completion of the design (and construction) effort and a professional presentation of the results.

EE 458. 3-3-0
Electronics III
Prerequisite: EE 358.
Ideal and non-ideal operational amplifiers, linear and nonlinear op amp circuit analysis and design. Active filter design. Frequency response and noise analysis in op amp circuits. Digital Electronic circuits.

EE 460. 3-3-0
Computer-Aided Design of Integrated Circuits
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Introduction to the basic electrical properties and the technology of fabrication of MOS devices. Automatic layout generation, routing and design simulation with CAD tools using digital logic circuit examples. Case study and design project.

EE 462. 3-3-0
Random Variables and Random Processes
Prerequisite: Mth 427.
Probability, random variables, distribution and density functions, functions of random variables, joint distributions and density functions. Random processes, autocorrelation and crosscorrelation, linear system response.

EE 464. 3-3-0
Hardware Description Languages: VHDL
Prerequisite: EE 364.
Analysis and modelling of digital systems using hardware programming languages. More specifically VHDL (VHSIC Hardware Description Language) is introduced as a powerful EDA (Electronic Design Automation) tool for the design of complex digital systems. The course explores the design of specific systems ranging from simple counters to complete microprocessors. An industry standard language compiler and simulator are utilized throughout the course. Several ASIC (Application Specific Integrated Circuit) designs are implemented with FPGAs (Field Programmable Gate Arrays) in the laboratory.

EE 466. 3-3-0
Electromagnetics II
Prerequisite: EE 366.
Maxwell’s equations, constitutive relations, boundary conditions; Poynting theorem; plane waves, wave polarization, phase and group velocities; reflection, refraction and attenuation of plane waves in various media; transmission lines, wave guides and resonators, antennas and radiation; wave propagation and radar equation.

EE 468. 3-3-0
Computer Networking
Study of local area networks (LAN) and wide area networks (WAN). Survey of the state-of-the-art computer network. Topics include networking theory, design approaches, standards, topologies, OSI and TCP/IP, protocols, applications and distributed processing.

EE 470. 3-3-0
Control Systems II
Prerequisite: E 322.
Advanced study of root locus analysis. Frequency response analysis. Design and compensation techniques. Describing-function analysis of nonlinear control systems. Control system analysis and design using state-space methods.

EE 472. 3-3-0
State Space Analysis
Prerequisite: E 322.
Introduction to linear operators and linear spaces. State variable description of systems. Solutions for time varying and time invariant cases. Controllability of linear dynamical equations. Irreducible realizations of transfer function matrices. State variable feedback and observers. Stability of linear systems.

EE 474. 3-3-0
Communication Theory II
Prerequisite: EE 374.
Introduction to digital communication, random processes, source coding, digital transmission through an additive White Gaussian Noise Channel, PAM transmission through Band limited AWGN channels, digital transmission via Carrier Modulation, channel capacity and coding.

EE 476. 3-3-0
Direct Digital Controls
Prerequisites: E 322.
Basic theory of sampling and quantizing, z-transform analysis. System error analysis, modeling and optimal design of discrete data systems by performance indices. Stability of discrete data systems and design compensation.

EE 480. 3-3-0
Computer Organization and Architecture
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Basic and advanced concepts of CPU design, memory systems, and I/O interfacing. Alternative design and evaluation of the control unit, the arithmetic and logic unit, and memory hierarchy.

EE 484. 3-3-0
Electromagnetic Compatibility
Prerequisite: EE 466.
EMC requirements for electronic systems, non-ideal behavior of passive components, radiated emissions and susceptibility, conducted emissions and susceptibility, crosstalk, shielding, electrostatic discharge, measurements, system design for EMC.

EE 486. 3-3-0
Microprocessors
Prerequisite: EE 364.
Microprocessor evolution, MSI components, LSI-based design; microprocessor and microcomputer organization, assembly language and architecture; interrupts, peripherals, interfacing, A/D and D/A systems.

EE 487. 1-0-3
Microprocessor Laboratory
Co-requisite: EE 486.
Familiarity with microprocessor/microcontroller development and training systems - memory, I/O, CPU; assembly language; hardware and software experiments; microcontroller design projects involving design, prototyping and construction.

EE 488. 3-3-0
Digital Signal Processing I
Prerequisite: EE 374.
Introduction to Discrete-Time Signals and Systems. Fourier Transforms of Discrete-Time Signals, Discrete Fourier Transform, z transforms. Digital filter design. Implementation using digital signal processors.

EE 490. 3-3-0
Radiation and Antennas
Prerequisite: EE 466.
Radiation from simple sources; directivity, gain, and effective aperture; radiation resistance; linear antennas; mutual coupling; travelling wave antennas; receiving antennas and reciprocity; Friis formula and radar equation; propagation of waves.

EE 492. 3-3-0
Digital Image Processing
Prerequisites: EE 374 and MTH 451.
This course provides an introduction to the basic concepts and techniques of digital image processing and computer vision. Topics include sampling and quantization, image transforms, image enhancement, restoration, and coding.

 

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Engineering

E 100. 2-3-0
Ethics and Politics of Engineering
This course introduces engineering students to the ethical dimensions of their profession and to the interrelations of engineering projects and society. It describes the impact of technological systems on culture, especially American culture, and reactions of our culture to technology.

E 105
Engineering Graphics and Design 3 cr.
This course provides an introduction to the engineering disciplines and computer graphics. Its emphasis is on design, solution of unstructured problems, visualization and communication of a design using proper drafing techniques. The mode of delivery is a mixture of lecture and laboratory. The laboratory experience takes the form of hands-on activities. The course contains a series of experiences drawn from different engineering disciplines to illustrate design methodology and engineering problem solving.

E 107 1 cr.
Introduction to Solid Modeling
An introduction to feature based solid modeling of three dimensional components and assemblies. Topics will include: Design in the context of computer tools and concurrent engineering; 2D versus 3D CAD modeling; Sketching and constraining 2D cross sections and creating 3D features from those sections; Feature based solid modeling; Fundamentals of parametric modeling; Constructive solid geometry and Boolean operations on solids; Creating multi-level CAD assemblies.

E 109. 1 cr.
Summer Design Institute
A forty-hour intensive course for high school students interested in engineering. This is a hands-on experience involving the students in the Computer Aided Design, Computer Aided Engineering and Computer Aided Manufacturing. The course is based around SDRCs IDEAS software using Sun Ultra 2 hardware.

E 110. 2-0-2
Introduction to Engineering Computing
A special course for high school students which introduces the solution of engineering problems with computers. This laboratory based course provides instruction of various software applications including word processing, spreadsheets, computer graphics and others.

E 120. 2-2-0
Engineering Communications
A special course for high school students dealing with written and oral communications of a technical nature. This course is taken in parallel with E110 - the computer capabilities developed in that course are used to meet the objectives of E120.

E 130. 2-2-0
Critical Thought and Speech
A special course for high school students designed to introduce basic concepts in public speaking: introductory, informative and persuasive speaking. Researching and writing are also highlighted, with mandatory library assignments.

E 204. 3 cr.
Co-requisite: MTH 140 or MTH 141.
This course will present an introduction to computers, algorithm design, and Structured Programming with C. The programming will include data types, assignment statements, input/output, conditional statements, looping, and functions. The C language I/O, and math libraries will be introduced. Also, built-in and user-defined data types, arrays, strings, records, and pointers will be introduced.

E 301. 1-1-0
Professional World of Work I
This course provides students with the opportunity to evaluate the career relationship of their first industrial experience, to investigate in depth several companies as potential post-graduation employers, and gain experience in explaining their analysis on the above in written and oral presentations in a professional manner, (i.e. all oral presentations will be made using Power Point software.) Offered only in the fall term.

E 302. 1-2-0
Professional World of Work II
This course focuses on enhancing the student’s understanding of major issues that impact the engineering profession and improving the student’s ability to form judgement based on literature analysis and available data. Using a team format, these objectives will be achieved through student responses to external presenters. These responses include a logic based combination of written and oral presentations (using Power Point software). Offered only in the summer term.

E 303. 1-6-0
Professional World of Work III
This course focuses on preparation for the Fundamentals of Engineering Examination which is the first step toward professional licensure. Following a pre-test patterned after the nationally based FE examination, students are provided refresher sessions in: mathematics, chemistry, statics, dynamics, science of materials - structure of matter, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, economics, principles of electrical engineering, and deformable bodies. A post test is given at the completion of the refresher series. The course is graded pass-fail. Offered only in the winter term.

E 312. 3-3-0
Statics
Prerequisite: PHY 160 and Co-requisite: MTH 241.
The application of equilibrium equations to the analysis of particles and rigid bodies. Topics include: vector algebra, moments, couples, free body diagrams, external forces and internal forces. The inertial properties of areas and solid objects are covered. Application of equilibrium to beams and other load supporting structures is described.

E 313. 3-3-0
Dynamics
Prerequisite: E 312.
The application of kinematics and kinetics to particles and rigid bodies. The course considers fixed and moving reference frames, momentum and energy methods and applications in engineering problems.

E 314. 3-3-0
Fluid Mechanics
Prerequisite: E 312 and Co-requisite: E 315 or equivalent.
An introduction to the fundamentals of fluid statics and dynamics. Topics include: integral formulations, the Bernoulli equation, dimensional analysis, internal and external viscous flow, and fluid machinery.

E 315. 3-3-0
Thermodynamics I
Prerequisites: CHM 107, MTH 142, PHY 160.
An introduction to the First and Second Laws of Thermodynamics. Topics include: evaluation of various forms of heat, work, other energy forms, properties of fluids, conservation of mass, conservation of energy, and entropy. Applications are made to turbines, pumps, heat exchangers, compressor, nozzles, throttling valves, and power and reverse cycles.

E 317. 3-3-0
Science of Materials
Prerequisite: CHM 107.
An introduction to the study of metals, polymers and ceramics as engineering materials. The course considers the atomic, molecular and crystalline structure of materials and how they are related to material properties.

E 319. 1-0-3
Fluid Mechanics Laboratory
Co-requisite: E 314.
A set of laboratory experiences to illustrate fluid mechanics principles. Experiments are designed to demonstrate conservation of mass and energy and the momentum principle. Exercises include: analysis of turbomachinery, flow measurements and frictional losses.

E 320. 3-3-0
Principles of Electrical Engineering
Prerequisites: MTH 241 and PHY 162, 163.
A course designed for non-electrical engineering students to provide theoretical and practical insights in the basic areas of electrical engineering. Topics include: basic linear network theory, electronics, electromechanical energy conversion and computer systems.

E 321. 1-0-3
Principles of Electrical Engineering Laboratory
Co-requisite: E 320.
Use of ammeter, voltmeter, oscilloscope; investigation of circuit theorems; transient and steady-state behavior of RLC circuits; sinusoidal and steady-state analysis; applications of diodes, transistors, and digital logic circuits.

E 322. 3-3-0
Control Systems
Prerequisite: MTH 372.
Modeling of chemical, electrical, mechanical and hydraulic systems. Analytic solution of open loop and feedback type systems. Routh criteria. Root Locus methods in design of systems and evaluation of system performance. Time and frequency domain design of control systems.

E 324. 3-3-0
Engineering Economy
Prerequisite: MTH 241.
Basic concepts of economic analysis of alternatives. Depreciation and depletion. Sensitivity and risk analysis. Economic analysis of operations.

E 326. 3-3-0
Mechanics of Deformable Bodies
Prerequisite: E 312.
Response of non-rigid solids to different types of loads such as tension, compression, torsion and bending. The course considers stress-strain relationships and their use in the analysis and design of structures, pressure vessels and machine components. The concept of stability is introduced as applied to the buckling of columns.

E 327. 1-0-3
Mechanics of Deformable Bodies Laboratory
Co-requisite: E 326.
A set of laboratory experiences to illustrate solid mechanics principles. Experiments are designed to demonstrate stress characteristics under tensile and compressive deformation, torsion, buckling and bending. An introduction to strain gages and data acquisition is provided.

E 340. 3-3-0
Heat Transfer
Prerequisites: E 314, E 315, MTH 372.
An introduction to conduction, convection, and radiation. Topics include: one- and two-dimensional steady and transient conduction, internal and external convection, natural and forced convection, environmental radiation, and radiation exchange between gray surfaces. Applications are made to heat exchangers, finned surfaces, and various industrial processes.

E 341. 1-0-3
Heat Transfer Laboratory
Co-requisite: E 340.
A set of laboratory experiences to illustrate heat transfer principles. Experiments are designed to demonstrate conduction, convection and radiation. Exercises include the application of thermocouples, thermistors and data acquisition equipment.

E 400. credits vary
Advanced Topics in Engineering
Prerequisite: Permission of the dean.
Independent study on a topic of mutual interest between a faculty member and student.

E 442. 3-3-0
Finite Element Methods
Prerequisite: E 326 and MTH 402 or CE 342.
Element operations in local and global coordinates, elements of elasticity, direct methods of element formulation, variational principles, function representations of element behavior and geometry, isotropic representation, applications.

E 444. 3-3-0
Vibrations
Prerequisites: MTH 372, E 313.
A study of the oscillation of mechanical systems. The course considers free and forced vibrations of one and two degree of freedom systems. The concepts of rotating and reciprocating unbalance, critical speeds, vibration isolation and transmissibility and frequency response are introduced. Matrix methods are applied.

E 448. 3-3-0
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
Prerequisite: E 314.
An in-depth study of fluid dynamics. The course considers derivation of the Navier-Stokes equations and the inviscid flow equations. Boundary layer theory, one and two dimensional flow and steady and unsteady flows are studied. Solution techniques include: the method of complex analysis, conformal mapping and numerical techniques.

E 478. 3-1-2
Mechatronics
Prerequisite: E320 or EE352.
Principles, components, and design of mechatronic systems, including modeling and simulation, sensors, actuators, control strategies, and instrumentation. These topics will be explored in the context of a group project.

 

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English

During the Orientation periods or during each term, all incoming freshmen and most transfer students are required to take an English Placement Test. On the basis of its score a recommendation is made for initial courses in the English writing program.

ENL 130. 3 cr.
Special College Writing
Designed for students with minimal control over the writing process. This course provides assistance in developing basics such as generating, organizing and developing ideas, adjusting writing to different audiences, maintaining focus and coherence, and editing. Tutorial sessions assist students in remedying weaknesses in grammar, spelling, and punctuation.

ENL 131. 3 cr.
Academic Writing
Emphasis on writing of expository and persuasive papers. Students explore a topic to generate ideas, identify audience, maintain focus, decide on strategies of organization and development, and revise with attention to style and standard usage. Instructors complement class discussions with individual conferences.

200-Level Courses

These courses introduce students to literary forms and techniques, and familiarize them with critical methodologies. Designed to improve writing developed in the 100 sequence, they serve as preliminary studies to the core of the major programs for English majors. Prerequisite for all courses is ENL 131 or equivalent.

ENL 201. 3 cr.
The Journal
Orientation to the study of English, focusing on the use of the journal as a tool to integrate reading and writing while creative, logical, and critical thinking are applied to literature.

ENL 202. 3 cr.
Writing Across the Curriculum
Designed for students who wish additional training in the writing of prose nonfiction. This course concentrates on research reports, articles, critical reviews, expository narratives, for example, with special attention to problems of organization and voice, and their relation to the audience.

ENL 204. 3 cr.
Introduction to Business Writing
Introduction to the writing of informational and persuasive forms used in the daily activity of business. Special attention is paid to professional standards of writing, the situations business writers face, and expectations of audiences.

ENL 205. 3 cr.
Introduction to Creative Writing
Emphasis on the valuable tension between individual vision and the demands that various genres (poetry, short story, dialogues, drama, etc.) place on the individual’s creativity. Emphasizing both practical "tools" for creative writing and their relationship to nurturing the imagination, the course serves students going into teaching and/or going on to upper-level creative writing courses.

ENL 235. 3 cr.
The Study of Fiction
Serious and analytical reading of a variety of fiction leading to an understanding of the ways that fiction operates, studied from at least three critical points of view.

ENL 236. 3 cr.
Diverse Voices in Fiction
Introduces students to careful literary analysis by focusing on literature drawn from "marginalized" voices in literature. The course explores how such literatures sit in relation to the dominant culture, and how interchanges between the established and the new change each. Students address the literature through at least three critical methods important to literary study.

ENL 245. 3 cr.
The Study of Poetry
Serious and analytical reading of poems designed to improve critical skills and increase understanding of these literary forms, studied from at least three critical points of view.

ENL 255. 3 cr.
Studies in the Film
A study of the development of the film and important films from principal film-producing countries, along with the artistry of the directors who produced them.

ENL 265. 3 cr.
The Study of Drama
Serious and analytical reading of drama designed to improve critical skills and increase understanding of plays, studied from at least three critical methods.

ENL 280. 3cr.
Introduction to Media Studies
Emphasizes a balance of theory and practice while introducing students to a growing field of research rooted in critical analysis of film, television, radio, and digital media. Students not only study the critical works of Marshall McLuhan, Stuart Hall, Donna Haraway, et al; they also engage in real-world projects that examine the process involved in media production and reception.

ENL 285. 3 cr.
African American Literature
Reading and discussion of poetry, drama, and fiction of traditional and contemporary black authors.

ENL 295. 3 cr.
The Study of Folklore
Folktale and folkways emphasized among the various genres popular with selected folk groups. Students will be required to collect folklore for entry into the Computerized Folklore Archives.

300-400 Level Courses

These sequences constitute the core of the major program and support programs in other departments. ENL 131 or equivalent is a prerequisite to all upper-level courses. English majors must also have completed ENL 245.

ENL 301. 3 cr.
The Writing of Fiction
Student writing of fiction, class discussion, and evaluation: the components of the short story, the language, and structure of fiction.

ENL 302. 3 cr.
The Writing of Poetry
Student writing of poetry, class discussion, and evaluation: the language, sounds, images, figures, rhythms, stanzas, and forms of poetry.

ENL 303. 3 cr.
Technical Writing
Practical application of basic technical writing principles and acceptable guidelines in scientific and industrial reporting. Students use an audience-centered approach on lab and field studies, memoranda, progress reports, and typical formal documents.

ENL 304. 3cr.
Script Writing
An introduction to the art of motion picture scriptwriting through san approach that asks students to both critique screenplays as well as produce their own. In addition to traditional, classic Hollywood modes of storytelling, the course examines the more experimental cinematic narrative practices of the postmodern era, including non-linear alternatives to traditional cause-and-effect plots, self-reflexive narrative, and the impact of digital cinema on visual narrative.

ENL 305. 3 cr.
Freelance Writing for Print and Web
This course provides practical experience for writers who want to publish in established "tree-press" (paper) venues or the newly influential "e-press" venues of the web and other electronic media. Students develop real-world projects and submit them to real-world markets.

ENL 306. 3 cr.
Research and Research Writing
Advanced techniques in gathering research through field work, interviews, and computer retrieval. Students will write research papers on their findings and will be taken step by step through the process which includes note taking, analysis, outlining, and documentation.

ENL 311. 3 cr.
American Literature to 1865
Study of the chief trends and figures in American literature from the beginnings through the Civil War.

ENL 312. 3 cr.
American Literature since 1865
Study in the chief trends and figures from 1865 to 1945.

ENL 320. 3cr
Medieval Literature
This course provides study of the chief trends and representative figures of the Middle Ages. The course begins with Beowulf and goes on to representative figures such as Chaucer, Langland, the Gawain Poet, Middle English lyrics, the cycle plays, Everyman and Malory.

ENL 321. 3 cr.
Renaissance Literature
This course provides study of the chief trends and representative figures of the Renaissance.

ENL 322. 3 cr.
English Literature of the 17th and 18th Centuries
This course provides study of the chief trends and representative figures of the l8th century.

ENL 323. 3 cr.
English Literature of the 19th Century
Study of the chief trends and figures in Romantic and Victorian English literature.

ENL 326. 3 cr.
History of the English Language
Study of the development of the language in its Old English, Middle English, and early Modern English forms. Reference is made to the principal literature of various periods.

ENL 334. 3 cr.
Transatlantic Modernisms
This course provides both an introduction to and a critical examination of US and British literatures between WWI and WWII. Topics include but are not limited to: modernist aesthetics and formal experimentations, the intersections of literature and the visual arts, war and technology, literature and politics, the cultural construction of gender, . race and sexual orientation, and metropolitan life.

ENL 335. 3 cr.
Post-1945 Literature
Studies the literature that emerges out of the cultural shifts that culminated in World war II. The post-war encompasses a broad range of literary response: the high postmoderns, the Beats, magical realism, identity-based fictions, and experimental modes such as hypertext. The course studies both the origins of such movements and the movements themselves.

ENL 375. 3 cr.
Film Genres
Study of the major categories of popular film – western, gangster, musical, comedy – that state public values.

ENL 376. 3 cr.
The Art of the Film
Study of the twentieth century’s unique art form, the film, with emphasis on the collected work of a director or on a theme.

ENL 390. 3 cr.
Children’s Literature
Exploration of values inherent in the major genres of children’s books. Emphasis is on developing critical skills for evaluating literature used in pre-school, elementary, and middle school grades.

ENL 395. 1-3 cr.
Folklore Archiving
Students work with a computer on one or more topics in the University’s Folklore Archive.

ENL 398. 1-3 cr.
Independent Study
Intensive study in an area chosen by the student for independent work under the direction of a specialist.

ENL 405. 3 cr.
Editorial Processes and Products
Based in the established and emerging publications of the University, the course teaches students to articulate a publication’s critical focus. Students then master skills that bring a publication to press: document flow; peer review processes; correspondence standards; electronic pre-press; ISBN/ISSN registry; LC cataloging; cost-effective printing; marketing/distribution issues; and online versions of print texts. Prepares students for work with publishers, editors and with scholarly publications.

ENL 406. 3 cr.
The Writing Exchange
A contract course in which students select projects in keeping with their career objectives. This course is cycled for pre-professional students as the need arises.

ENL 409. 3 cr.
Modern American English
An introduction to structural grammar and transformational-generative grammar. Some consideration of the origins and development of the English language.

ENL 412. 3 cr.
Major American Writers After 1865
Each time the course is offered the writers will be designated. Open to advanced undergraduates and graduates.

ENL 480. 3 cr.
Literary Criticism
Study of major critical theories and their practical application to determine the strength and limitations of each approach.

ENL 490. 3 cr.
Senior Seminar
Prerequisite: Senior standing.
Content will vary based on the expertise of the professor.

ENL 491. 3 cr.
Information Design Laboratory
Based in the Information Design Laboratory, the course emphasizes the interchange between theory and practice necessary to intelligently critique the writing typical of our "visual culture." The course emphasizes the Internet, and students often create web sites for academic, professional and other University purposes. The course builds on skills acquired in ENL 305.

English Topics Courses:

The English Department recognizes that any text sits in a complex web of relationships that make it part of the larger culture. Examining these relationships is an essential part of disciplinary study. The specific emphasis of any "topics" section will be announced in the schedule book, but the titles below indicate the focus of each course. We emphasize a particular set of relationships in our "topics" courses that put texts into context:

ENL 460. Topics in Literary history

ENL 461. Topics in Literature and Science

ENL 462. Topics in Genre

ENL 463. Topics Authorial Studies

ENL 464. Topics in Race

ENL 465. Topics in Gender

ENL 466. Topics in Class

ENL 467. Topics in Cultural Studies

ENL 468. Topics in World Literature

ENL 469. Topics in Religion

 

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Ethics

The three courses listed below are designed to fulfill the ethics component of Objective 6 in the University Core Curriculum. Additional courses in Philosophy and Religious Studies also fulfill this requirement. See the Core Curriculum document in each term’s class schedule for the list of these courses.

ETH 259. 3 cr.
Business Ethics
An introduction to the ethical discussion of issues relating to business and economics. This course examines the dilemmas facing employers and employees in light of primary religious values: human dignity, a just response to the poor, concern for the common good, and care of the earth. The course focuses on how issues effect society as a whole as well as on personal ethical dilemmas.

ETH 358. 3 cr.
Health Care Ethics
An examination of moral issues in health care delivery, health care policy, and biomedical research. Discussion will focus on moral theories, principles and values and their application to such issues as professional-patient relationships, euthanasia, abortion, human experimentation, and access to health care.

ETH 359. 3 cr.
Ethics and Public Policy
An in-depth analysis of current and competing political theories and the values implicit in them. Looks at the basic values and assumptions which underlie current political theories as expressed in contemporary public policy issues such as ethics for elected officials, health care, tax policy, death penalty, abortion, poverty, welfare, etc., while exploring the basis for community in a pluralistic society.