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Kevin Daimi
Associate Professor of Computer Science, teaches artificial intelligence, Internet programming with Java, computer science I & II, data structures, compiler design, and UNIX. He worked in the computer industry for several years. Daimi has published papers in the areas of expert systems, natural language processing, and intelligent tutoring systems. He also authored two books. He received his Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from the University of Baghdad, a Master of Science in Applied Mathematics, and a Ph.D. in Computational Optimal Control from Cranfield Institute of Technology, England. Daimi joined the University in 1998.

Robert Daniels
Assistant Professor of Social Work, teaches social work research methods, social work practice, social welfare, and policy. Daniels’ publications and presentations deal with social problems, including drug addiction, multiculturalism, family and child welfare issues, corrections, and research into the efficiency of social welfare programs. His most recent publication was a book chapter (co-authored) on child endangerment in Law Enforcement and Social Work, 1990. He currently works on publication topics including the black church and social welfare. He holds a B.A. in Sociology and M.S.W. from Wayne State University. He completed his social work doctorate coursework at Columbia University. Daniels joined the University in 1980.

Shuvra Das
Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, teaches mechanics of materials, mechanical design, computer aided design, and finite element methods. His research interests and publications are in mechanistic modeling of manufacturing processes, solution of inverse problems, laser-assisted manufacturing, and the thermo-mechanics of manufacturing. He received the Engineering Teacher of the Year Award in 1996. Das earned his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Iowa State University. He was a post-doctoral research associate at University of Notre Dame and worked as an analysis engineer for Concurrent Technologies Corporation prior to joining the University in 1993.

Charles A. Dause
Associate Professor of Communication Studies. Dause’s academic background is in communication studies with a specialty in argumentation and debate. He is co-author of Argumentation: Inquiry and Advocacy, a college argumentation text. Dause developed and implemented the Academic Exploration Program at the University. He has done numerous programs on undergraduate advising issues for the National Academic Advising Association. Dause holds a B.A. degree from Muskingum College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1964.

Jeanne M. David
Associate Professor of Accounting, teaches introductory and upper level financial and managerial accounting. She has published in the Journal of Business Ethics and Research in Accounting Ethics and made presentations for the American Accounting Association, ORSA/ TIMS, and the Institute of Management Accountants. She is a Michigan Council director and Oakland County Chapter past president of the Institute of Management Accountants and a member of the American Accounting Association and Beta Alpha Psi. David received her CPA from Texas, her Ph.D. and MBA from Texas A & M University and her B.S. from the University of Lowell. She joined the University in 1988.

Vicky Pebsworth Debold
Associate Professor of Nursing, teaches graduate theory courses in health systems management, research and healthcare delivery and policy issues. Debold received her Ph.D. in Health Services Organization and Policy and Nursing through the Schools of Public Health and Nursing at the University of Michigan, where she was a Regent’s Fellow. She is completing a postdoctoral research fellowship at the University of Michigan and Michigan Peer Review Organization. Her research focuses on the use of computerized medical records and standardized nursing languages to assess health care quality. Prior to working on her doctorate, she was a health policy analyst for the Physician Payment Review Commission, an advisory body to the U.S. Congress. She joined the University in 2000.

Edwin B. DeWindt
Professor of History, teaches the history of England and the Middle Ages. He is the author and editor of several books on society and law in the English Middle Ages, among them, Royal Justice and the Medieval English Countryside. A recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, DeWindt is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He holds a Ph.B. degree from the University of Detroit, the Licentiate of Medieval Studies [LMS] from the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, and a Ph.D. degree from the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto. He joined the University in 1968.

Vivian I. Dicks
Professor of Communication Studies, teaches argumentation, audience analysis, group dynamics, persuasion, and public speaking. Dicks’ research and publications deal with legal rhetoric. She holds a B.A. degree from Wayne State University, M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Ohio State University, and a J.D. degree from the Detroit College of Law. Dicks joined the University in 1979.

Linda Louise Dobis
Assistant Professor, Department of Periodontology and Dental Hygiene, teaches non-surgical diagnosis and treatment planning of periodontal disease. Her areas of interest include periodontology and oral microbiology. She received her D.D.S. from the University of Detroit Mercy, a Certificate in Hospital Dentistry from the University of Iowa Hospitals and Clinics and a Certificate in Periodontology from the University of Iowa College of Dentistry. Dr. Dobis joined the University in 1998.

William S. Dunifon
Dean and Professor of Education. Dunifon holds a Ph.D. and M.A. from the University of Michigan. He earned his Master of Divinity degree from Princeton Theological Seminary and his A.B. in American Studies from Stetson University. Dunifon has taught graduate and undergraduate courses in organizational leadership, planned organizational change, and educational administration. In addition, he has published several articles on effective organizational leadership and the effective implementation of social policy. He has served as a consultant to General Motors Corporation, the Michigan Education Association, several school systems and county and municipal governments in several states.

Utpal Dutta
Professor and Chair of Civil & Environmental Engineering, teaches transportation engineering, constructional materials, engineering economics and optimization. Dutta’s publications and professional presentations both here and abroad have dealt with transportation planning, use of waste materials in highway construction and transportation safety and control. He is currently doing research on the use of automotive shredder residue in asphalt pavement. In 1994, he was awarded the UDM President’s Award for Faculty Excellence. Dutta has a Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma and is a licensed professional engineer in Michigan. He joined the University in 1988.

John M. Dwyer
Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, teaches mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Dwyer’s publications have included numerical evaluations of mathematical functions and social issues of (computer) technology. He has given numerous talks on mathematics, statistics, and computer science topics. His current interests include the generalized calculus and nonrational processes (such as for artificial intelligence). He has served as chair (1974-77) and interim chair (1990-91) of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. He received his A.B. and M.S. from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor and his Ph.D. from Texas A & M University. He joined the University in 1969.

Nancy Dwyer
Assistant Professor of Mathematics, teaches calculus, linear algebra, number theory, and mathematics for elementary teachers. Her teaching background includes 12 years of teaching on both the elementary and secondary levels and the teaching of college level mathematics in Ohio and Georgia. Dwyer is a Project NeExT Fellow. Her research interests include finding ways to incorporate problem solving involving real world applications into the mathematics curriculum. Dwyer earned a Master’s in Guidance and Counseling and a Master’s in Mathematics from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from the University of Toledo. She joined the University in 1997.