Graduate Catalog 2016-2017

UDM Academic Policies Course Descriptions List of All Programs Faculty
Law Courses

LAW 0001 Special Summer ProgramCredit Hours: 0

The Special Summer Program (SSP) is a conditional admission program for UDM School of Law applicants who do not meet the standards of the entering class, but show potential for the study of law. Satisfactory demonstration of ability in the SSP permits admission to UDM's J.D. program only.

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LAW 1060 Introduction to Legal Research & CommunicationCredit Hours: 2

Introduction to Legal Research and Communication provides first-semester law students with training in print-based and online research (both state and federal), in citation, in grammar and language usage, and in basic legal analysis and writing. Successful completion of this two-credit pass/fail course is a prerequisite to ALTA I, which is offered in Term II of students’ first year.

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LAW 1070 Comparative Legal Writing & ResearchCredit Hours: 4 OR 5

Applied Legal Theory & Analysis for the Canadian/American Dual JD Degree Program is a comprehensive comparative research and writing course. Students learn the differences and similarities between the legal systems of the United States and Canada including, among other things, governmental structure, court structure, jurisdiction, procedure, statutes, case law, administrative materials, secondary materials, ethics, research and citation. Equally important, they explore the writing protocols in each country and prepare a number of written assignments. The law of Contract provides the doctrinal focus for many of the research and writing assignments. The fall semester focuses on predictive writing, and the winter semester focuses on persuasive writing and transactional drafting. The highlight of the course involves students participating in two moot court experiences, each one specifically designed for the jurisdiction in which it takes place.
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LAW 1080 Applied Legal Theory and AnalysisCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

Applied Legal Theory and Analysis is a required first-year course that teaches students the fundamental lawyering skills of communication, research, legal analysis and reasoning, and problem solving. ALTA begins with doctrine most often conceptually difficult material from the law of Contract and requires students to apply that doctrine at increasingly sophisticated levels in the context of preparing specific documents common to the practice of law. There are three units of research and writing assignments. The first unit explores the foreseeability element of consequential damages, the second unit delves into consideration doctrine, and the third unit involves a federal statutory issue. The fall semester focuses on predictive writing, and the winter semester focuses on persuasive writing and transactional drafting. The highlight of the course involves students' participation in the G. Mennen Williams Moot Court Competition.
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LAW 1110 Contracts ICredit Hours: 3

Contracts I primarily covers the formation of contracts, with a brief examination of contract remedies. Historical development of basic contractual concepts is traced as a foundation for modern contract law. In the first semester, special attention is given to the requirements of mutual assent, offer and acceptance, the Statute of Frauds, and consideration and reliance.

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LAW 1111 Contracts IICredit Hours: 3

Contracts II primarily covers the performance and enforcement of contracts. In the second semester, focus turns to excuses for non-performance, interpretation and construction of contracts, conditions, and remedies for breach. The relationships among common law generally, contract law specifically, the Uniform Commercial Code, international law such as the Convention on the International Sale of Goods, and authority such as the Restatement (Second) of Contracts are considered in greater depth. 

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LAW 1120 Property ICredit Hours: 3

Property Law is one of the most ancient and fundamental areas of law. In addition, our relationship with the things around us is also a very personal and emotional part of our lives. We may never be accused of a crime, might never enter into any but the most basic of contracts, might never commit or be injured by a tort, but we all own things, and most Americans eventually own some land as well. Property Law therefore covers core concepts of real and personal property to provide a necessary foundation – both substantive and skill-based – to more advanced courses.

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LAW 1121 Property IICredit Hours: 3

Having acquired a working understanding of both the fundamental legal concepts and the kinds of interests that Property Law deals with, students in Property II master concepts that are more complex and more variable than those covered in Property I. Students must apply skills developed during Property I to a larger volume of more difficult text covered at a faster pace.

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LAW 1130 TortsCredit Hours: 4

Torts is the study of civil legal wrongs (other than those based on contract). The course focuses principally on negligence, but includes introductions to intentional torts, strict liability, and product liability.
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LAW 1140 Criminal LawCredit Hours: 3

This required course focuses on substantive criminal law, according to the common law and the Model Penal Code. The following topics are covered: mens rea, actus reus, murder, rape, theft offenses, attempts, conspiracy, accomplice liability, self-defense, necessity, duress, intoxication, and insanity.
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LAW 1150 Civil Procedure ICredit Hours: 3

Civil Procedure I is an in-depth examination of rules and dynamics of modern civil procedure in state and federal courts. Major emphasis is given to the limitations imposed by requirements that courts possess both subject matter and personal jurisdiction. We will also study the tensions of concurrent jurisdiction in state and federal courts and the Erie doctrine. We conduct an overview of litigation from commencement through appeal, with focus on pleadings, service of process and motions to dismiss. Successfully completing the course will equip students to competently analyze most basic problems of jurisdiction and challenges to selection of a forum.

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LAW 1151 Civil Procedure IICredit Hours: 3

Civil Procedure II covers an in-depth study of the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure. Topics include, pleadings, discovery, motion practice, joinder devices and jury trials. The concepts of claim and issue preclusion, designed to avoid repetitive or piecemeal litigation, also are discussed.

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LAW 1200 Critical Legal SkillsCredit Hours: 1

This course will focus on building the analytical, writing, and organizational skills necessary to enhance the student's ability to perform well in law school, on the bar examination, and in the practice of law. The course will involve, among other things, writing assignments, practice essay examination questions, quizzes, and comprehension exercises, all coordinated with the subject areas of Contracts, Civil Procedure, or both. First-year students will have enrollment priority.
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LAW 2010 Business OrganizationsCredit Hours: 4

This course provides the student with an introduction to relevant concepts in the selection of form of business enterprise. General principles of agency are covered, as well as those of partnership and limited liability companies. The bulk of the course deals with principles of corporate law, specifically, the formation of the corporation; the concept of limited liability; the rights and duties of the corporate actors (shareholders, directors and officers); shareholder oppression; remedies available to aggrieved parties. Much of the curriculum focuses on issues related to closely held corporations. To a lesser extent, the student will be familiarized with some of the more complex problems facing publicly owned companies, such as capital formation, securities regulation, takeovers, and corporate control problems. Extensive treatment of these latter issues, however, is left for the more advanced courses in corporate law.
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LAW 2040 Australian Law and the Constitution: The Treatment of Property and ReligionCredit Hours: 1

This course provides students with a brief introduction to the Australian legal system. Specifically, it introduces the Australian Constitution, the nature of Australian federalism, and the role and function of the High Court (Australia's final appellate court and equivalent to the United States Supreme Court). Following this brief background, the course focuses on the landmark High Court decision in Mabo v Queensland [No 2] (1992) 175 CLR 1 (which held that native title (the American equivalent of Indian Title) forms a part of Australian real property law). This case provides a concrete example of Australian federalism in action, in this case the interaction between the High Court, the Commonwealth (federal) government, and the States, through the enactment of the Native Title Act 1993 (Cth) - the operation of the High Court, and Australian real property law. This course will appeal to those students who have an interest in constitutional law, real property law, and American Indian law.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 2060 US Constitutional LawCredit Hours: 4

A study of the origins and fundamentals of judicial review and the constitutional litigation process, and of several important constitutional law topics: federalism, including federal powers, regulation of commerce, and intergovernmental immunities; separation of powers, including the powers of the Presidency and interbranch conflicts and immunities; state action; procedural and substantive due process; freedom of speech; and the antidiscrimination principles of the equal protection clause of the 14th Amendment. Some topics are covered in depth. Others (particularly free speech and equal protection) are introduced, with detailed coverage provided by advanced constitutional law courses.
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LAW 2070 First AmendmentCredit Hours: 3

This course examines the rights of free expression guaranteed by the First Amendment. This examination considers how free speech rights impact national security, morality, education, elections, charitable solicitations, symbolic speech, and commercial speech. Also considered is freedom of religion and separation of church and state.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 2080 United States Civil Procedure Dual JD ProgramCredit Hours: 3

This course will focus on the rules of procedure in the United States courts in civil litigation. Emphasis will be placed on those areas of procedure that depart from the Canadian model.

Restricted to students enrolled in the Dual JD Program.
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LAW 2100 Criminal ProcedureCredit Hours: 4

This course explores the United States Supreme Court's jurisprudence concerning the rights of criminal defendants under the 4th, 5th, 6th, and 14th Amendments, with particular emphasis on the right to counsel, search and seizure, confessions, the various exclusionary rules, the right to confrontation, and the right to jury trial.
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LAW 2120 Canadian and United States TortsCredit Hours: 5

Torts is the study of civil legal wrongs (other than those based on contract). The course focuses principally on negligence, but includes introductions to intentional torts, strict liability, and product liability.
A Canadian Torts module is also taught in the same Term and is treated as 1 credit of the 5 credits for this course. Restricted to students enrolled in the Dual J.D. Program.
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LAW 2121 Torts Canadian ModuleCredit Hours: 1

The Canadian module to Torts.
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LAW 2130 Estates and TrustsCredit Hours: 4

This course studies the descent and distribution of intestate estates. It analyzes typical state statutes and rules of construction, testamentary dispositions, and doctrines of construction including ademption, satisfaction, incorporation of reference, etc. It covers the protection afforded to the immediate family of the deceased and considers alternatives to testamentary dispositions by means of gifts and trusts. It is a study of the basic law of trusts and their uses. The establishment of various types of trusts, the rights of settlor, trustee, beneficiary, and third parties is also studied.
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LAW 2140 Canon LawCredit Hours: 2

Students will be introduced to an examination of the nature of canon law and a broad overview of its content. Emphasis will be placed on the nature, purpose, and history of law in the Church and on changes in the law brought about by Vatican II. Special attention will be given to Book II (The People of God) of the 1983 Code of Canon Law and principles of interpretation.
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LAW 2150 European Community LawCredit Hours: 2

The European Union is unique in international law, and it is interesting to see how this hybrid international organization is built. The course may focus on the history, institutions, and decision-making processes of the EU, as well as the protection of human rights and selected topics based on the expertise of the professor. This course enables students to analyze international legal situations through a multi-dimensional approach to the law.
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LAW 2160 Canadian and United States Business OrganizationsCredit Hours: 1 TO 5

This course provides the student with an introduction to relevant concepts in the selection of form of business enterprise. General principles of agency are covered, as well as those of partnership. The bulk of the course deals with principles of corporate law, specifically, the formation of the corporation; the rights and duties of the corporate actors (shareholders, directors and officers); remedies available to aggrieved parties. The course also introduces the students to some variations of corporate form, such as closely-held corporations and the new limited liability corporation. To a lesser extent, the student will be familiarized with some of the more complex problems facing corporations, such as securities regulation, takeovers, and corporate control problems. Extensive treatment of these latter issues, however, is left for the more advanced courses in corporate law.
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LAW 2210 Elder LawCredit Hours: 2

This course addresses legal and policy issues impacting older individuals (and their families), including discussion of government benefits (Social Security, Medicaid, Medicare, Supplemental Security Income), long-term care (types, contract issues, resident rights, and financial planning), guardianship and conservatorship, planning for incapacity, and health care decisions at the end of life. Also considered will be elder law practice, including the ethical problems frequently faced by lawyers representing older clients and their families. Grades will be assigned based on an examination (either in class or take home) or a paper.
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LAW 2220 EvidenceCredit Hours: 4

This course covers the law of evidence in both criminal and civil trials including the following subjects: burden of proof; allocation of authority between judge and jury; presumptions; judicial notice; direct and circumstantial evidence; relevancy and its specialized rules including character evidence; witness competency and direct and cross-examination of witnesses including impeachment; expert and opinion testimony; hearsay and its exceptions including the right of confrontation and privileges. Special attention is given to the Michigan and Federal Rules of Evidence and the differences between them.
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LAW 2230 Canadian and United States EvidenceCredit Hours: 5

This course covers the law of evidence in trials including the following subjects: judicial notice; demonstrative evidence; testimonial evidence; the hearsay rule and its exceptions; circumstantial proof; burden of proof; presumptions and other procedural consideration; privilege and other exclusionary rules. Special attention will be given to the Federal Rules of Evidence.
A Canadian Evidence module is also taught in the same Term which is treated as 1 credit of the 5 credits. Restricted to students enrolled in the Dual J.D. Program.
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LAW 2240 Family LawCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course covers the state regulation of the relationships between spouses, parents and children, and unmarried cohabitants. It analyzes the law governing marriage and marital dissolution, separation agreements, distribution of marital property, spousal and child support, and the tax consequences of divorce. Special attention is given to child custody determinations and to the professional responsibility of lawyers in handling family disputes.
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LAW 2250 Health LawCredit Hours: 3

This course studies the current issues in the rapidly developing field of health law. Topics include access to care and providers' legal obligations to treat indigent patients; the relationship between access to care and payors' financing of care; provider licensure and disciplinary rules; structure and governance of health care providers and payors; establishment and regulatory obligations of tax exempt providers; fraud and abuse laws governing hospitals' and physicians' arrangements with payors and impact of those laws on patient care; the doctrine of informed consent; and the impact on health care workers, payors, and consumers of medical record privacy laws (the study of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA)). Topics will be explored using a problem-solving approach that will provide students with the opportunity to apply health law doctrines studied in class to real-world problems.
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LAW 2310 Criminal SentencingCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course examines the law of sentencing from both a practical and theoretical perspective. The content and meaning of both the Michigan and U.S. Sentencing Guidelines schemes will be explored. Constitutional, statutory, and judicial limitations will also be examined.
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LAW 2340 Introduction to Canadian LawCredit Hours: 2

Students will learn about the Canadian legal system through introductory lectures and a series of hands-on, practical exercises that simulate the practice of law in Ontario. Students will engage in mock litigation of a civil case from beginning to end. One goal of the course is to burnish litigation skills and techniques while highlighting the differences between the Canadian and American legal systems.
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LAW 2350 Law and LiteratureCredit Hours: 2

This course will examine the psychological and ethical dimensions of the practice of law through reading and analysis of literary and scholarly works. The course will explore three overarching themes: 1. That which the law aims to do, or, the relationship between law and equity; 2. whether, and the manner in which, the law achieves its goals; and 3. examination of the characters lawyers and judges- who populate the law's universe.
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LAW 2390 Private Sector Labor LawCredit Hours: 3

This course covers the historical development of federal labor legislation with emphasis on the National Labor Relations Act, the Norris-LaGuardia Act, the Taft-Hartley Act, and the Labor-Management Disclosure Act. The course will deal with the representation rights and unfair labor practice provisions of the NLRA, the enforcement of collective bargaining agreements, labor injunctions, the duties of fair representation, and the rights of union members.
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LAW 2400 Public Sector Labor LawCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

Study of the legal and policy considerations which structure and define the still emerging area of public employee unionization. Frequent contrasts will be drawn with private sector labor relations and special attention will be given the following: bargaining units, mandatory subjects of bargaining, impasse resolution, strikes, compulsory arbitration, and the political and civil rights of public employees.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2390 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 2450 Construction LawCredit Hours: 3

As one of the largest sectors of the United States economy, the construction industry generates a significant amount of legal work. This course will survey the legal issues that arise in typical commercial construction projects. Some of these issues are unique to the construction industry, but many of them are present in other types of long-term commercial relationships. Accordingly, the ways of thinking about issues in construction law are frequently transferable to other settings, such as joint ventures, franchises, and leases. Students will learn the typical division of responsibilities among participants in the construction process (i.e., design professionals, owners, contractors, and subcontractors/suppliers). The course will then consider the variety of project delivery systems that are currently in use (design-bid-build, design-build, engineer-procure-construct, etc.) and the ways each allocates risks associated with delay, increased cost, and construction quality. Students will review standard form construction agreements, draft proposed modifications to those form agreements, and engage in a mock dispute resolution proceeding.

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LAW 2470 Professional ResponsibilityCredit Hours: 3

This course covers the sources and application of legal ethics rules, including the role of lawyer as "advocate" and "counselor." Special attention is given to the American Bar Association (ABA) Model Rules of Professional Conduct and the Michigan Rules of Professional Conduct. Course coverage also includes the requirements for admission to practice law; the lawyer disciplinary system; a lawyer's fiduciary duties to a client and duties owed to the courts and to society. The ABA Code of Judicial Conduct is reviewed to understand the ethical obligations of those who serve in a judicial capacity. Students are encouraged to contemplate the type of lawyer they want to become, with the course hopefully inspiring some of those future contemplations. A lawyer's potential civil liability and constitutional responsibilities (e.g. effective assistance of counsel) are also studied.

This course is exclusively tested on the Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination, as well as on an essay question of the Michigan Bar examination.

All lawyers need to understand their ethical responsibilities and duties whether one actively practices law or engages in a non-law field. This course promotes the ethical standards for law students to be properly prepared for their clinical course and the law firm program.

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LAW 2490 SalesCredit Hours: 3

A study of the important principles of Articles 2 (sale of goods and 2A (leases) of the Uniform Commercial Code and of their practical application.
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LAW 2500 Secured TransactionsCredit Hours: 3

A study of the law governing the creation, perfection, and enforcement of security interests in personal property under Article 9 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Analysis of the special problems arising from use of specific types of collateral, including documents of title under Article 7. Special developments affecting consumer debtors. Emphasis is placed on understanding the ongoing changes in the official text of the UCC and on proper drafting of the security agreement.
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LAW 2520 United States Basic Federal Income TaxationCredit Hours: 4

An introduction to the Federal income tax system. This course will cover the concept of gross income, identification of income subject to taxation, identification of the proper taxpayer, deductions in computing taxable income, basic tax accounting and timing principles, and capital gains and losses.
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LAW 2530 Introduction to Corporate and Partnership TaxCredit Hours: 3

This course builds on the Basic Federal Tax Course by introducing students to the fundamentals of business income taxation. The course begins with a survey of the tax considerations involved in choosing the type of entity through which to conduct a business. This theme will be revisited throughout the term as we examine the income tax regimes applicable to partnerships, corporations, LLC's and their owners. The course follows the life cycle of each entity from formation, through operations, to termination. The course will be useful both to aspiring tax practitioners, as well as those who are seeking careers as corporate lawyers or businessmen/women.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2520 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 2560 Payment SystemsCredit Hours: 3

This course will include some of the material previously covered in the course in Sales, but with greater depth and detail. The primary focus of the course will be Articles 3 (negotiable instruments), 4 (Bank Deposits), 4A (electronic funds transfers), 5 (letters of credit) and associated federal legislation and regulations.
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LAW 2600 Death Penalty in the United StatesCredit Hours: 2

This course examines the United States Supreme Court's death penalty jurisprudence since the late 1960s, with particular emphasis on the development of the Court's 8th Amendment 'death is different' jurisprudence. Potential topics to be covered include: theories of justice and of punishment; structure and constitutionality of capital sentencing schemes; aggravating and mitigating circumstances; juveniles; race; the mentally retarded; the mentally ill; innocence; evidentiary issues (e.g., victim impact evidence); methods of execution; political dimensions of advocacy; and executive clemency.
Students must take either Criminal Procedure (2600) or Constitutional Law (2060) before taking this class.
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LAW 2630 Introduction to French LawCredit Hours: 2

The course goes through an historical introduction, focusing on the sources of law, codification, judicial organization, the legal profession, the Constitution of 1958, in particular Articles 34 and 37, Article 16 -- control of the existence and exercise of executive power. It will outline of the law of obligations and study the formation of contracts. The requirements of mutual asset, offer and acceptance, cause and object; excuses for nonperformance; quasi-contracts will be reviewed. Delictual and the problem of manufacturing and automobile accidents in French law will also be covered along with topics in French administrative law.
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LAW 2640 Arab Americans and the LawCredit Hours: 2

This course will explore the journey of Arab-Americans through the American legal system from the beginnings of Arab immigration to the United States until the present day. We will study the arc of legal cases involving Arab-Americans in the realms of identity, "whiteness," immigration, terrorism, and discrimination, among other topics.

This course does not satisfy the International/Global Requirement.

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LAW 2650 Michigan Civil ProcedureCredit Hours: 2

This course covers civil procedure under the Michigan Court Rules and the Revised Judicature Act (MCL 600.101 et seq.) as applicable to a civil action in state circuit court. It builds on the body of knowledge gained in first year Civil Procedure (LAW 1150). The course will be taught in a lecture format with classroom discussion (it is not a trial practice course). It will focus on the court rules with reference to applicable statutes and case law.

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LAW 2790 Access to JusticeCredit Hours: 2

This two (2) credit course examines the history, policies, practices, and laws that demonstrate how the legal system addresses access to justice for all people, including those with economic needs or other barriers that prevent them from using the system effectively. The course will examine in the context of both criminal and civil law. The course will highlight recent innovations, such as specialty courts and self-help centers that enhance access to justice. Students will hear from various speakers whose work promotes access to justice. Finally, the course will permit students to contemplate and experience career options that promote access to justice for all.

There are no prerequisites for taking this course.

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LAW 2960 Immigration LawCredit Hours: 3

This course studies the constitutional and extra-constitutional law bases and restrictions on the power to regulate immigration into the United States. Included are substantive and procedural laws and regulations governing admission and removal of non-citizens from the United States; substantive and procedural laws governing admission of refugees and asylum seekers; and ethical issues related to the practice of immigration law and the operation of our immigration system.

Students may take either Immigration Law or LAW 6230 U.S. and Canadian Immigration Law but not both.

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LAW 3020 Administrative LawCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

The study of the administrative law process, concentrating on the functions and procedures of administrative agencies and judicial review of agency actions. Specific topics include the constitutional status of administrative agencies, statutory, judicial and political control of agencies, agency procedures including rulemaking, enforcement, and adjudication, and the right to and scope of judicial review.
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LAW 3030 AdmiraltyCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will provide an overview of Admiralty Law with special emphasis on such issues as maritime jurisdiction, collision, carriage of goods by sea, salvage, general average, maritime personal injury and the existence and enforcement of maritime liens. The course will also provide an overview as to special aspects of maritime practice and procedure.
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LAW 3050 Antitrust LawCredit Hours: 3

This course focuses on the legal control competitive business activities under federal legislation and evolving judicial interpretation. Major topics include price fixing, market diversion, group boycott and refusals to deal, monopolization, mergers, predatory pricing, exclusive dealing, tying arrangements and the oligopoly problem. Emphasis is placed on the use of economic theory in the development and application of the laws. However no economics background is required.
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LAW 3090 Civil Rights LitigationCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course focuses upon protection of the constitutional and statutory civil rights of United States citizens. The curriculum will include extensive coverage of Section 1983 federal civil rights litigation, with lesser coverage of Michigan's Elliott-Larsen Civil Rights Act. Litigation strategies are emphasized and topics covered include police misconduct, due process and equal protection.
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LAW 3100 Conflicts of LawsCredit Hours: 3

An investigation of the special problems arising out of legal disputes that implicate the interests of more than one jurisdiction, including the states, the federal government and foreign countries. The course gives significant attention to choice of law rules in disputes with multistate (and multinational) dimensions, to the interplay between federal and state law in choice of law (including a discussion of the seminal holding in Erie v. Tompkins and Erie's progeny) and to the contours of juridical power in multistate (and multinational) contexts, including the exercise of personal jurisdiction and enforcement of the judgments and decrees of other jurisdictions.
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LAW 3110 Fourteenth AmendmentCredit Hours: 3

This course examines the Fourteenth Amendment, including the history of its adoption, the incorporation doctrine, procedural and substantive due process, equal protection, and state action. Among topics covered are fundamental rights, race and gender discrimination, affirmative action, and voting rights. It may also include statutory civil rights laws, including 42 U.S.C. § 1

Prerequisites:
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3120 Copyright LawCredit Hours: 3

The course will study the rights of creators under Title 17 of the United States Code and analogous common law doctrines. Topics include the constitutional and historic basis for copyright; subject matter; originality; rights and infringements; the "fair use" doctrine, exemptions and compulsory licenses; notice, deposit and registration; problems of new technologies; and other problems of interest.

This course may be a prerequisite for Selected Topics in Entertainment Law Seminar (4120).
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LAW 3130 BankruptcyCredit Hours: 3

The process of collection, liquidation, and distribution of the estate of a bankrupt individual debtor, with a focus on the substantive and procedural law of bankruptcy proceedings and the relationship of state secured transaction law to the Bankruptcy Code of 1978. The course will begin with an overview of state secured transaction law and will also include a survey of the reorganization of corporate debtors under Chapter 11 of the Bankruptcy Code.
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LAW 3150 Employee Rights LawCredit Hours: 3

This course provides a study of laws pertaining to employer-employee relations, including federal and state anti-discrimination laws such as Title VII of the Civil Rights Act of 1964, the Age Discrimination in Employment Act, the Equal Pay Act, the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Civil Rights Act of 1991, and the Family Medical Leave Act. In addition, this course will cover non-discrimination areas of employment law, including for cause and at-will employment.
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LAW 3160 Environmental LawCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course provides an introduction to the legal and policy aspects of environmental protection. It will focus on the nature of our environmental predicament, i.e., our reliance on dwindling resources and increasingly toxic technology and on the role of law and public policy in preserving environmental quality. The major environmental statutes are introduced, including the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, the Clean Water Act, and the Endangered Species Act, as well as the Public Trust doctrine and the Michigan Environmental Protection Act.
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LAW 3170 Federal JurisdictionCredit Hours: 3

This course examines the breadth, limits and nature of federal courts. It analyzes the relationship between the federal courts and the Congress, the federal courts and the executive branch, and the federal courts and the states. It explores whether changes in federal jurisdiction can be seen as a responses to political, economic, and social considerations, or as mere case by case adjustments, producing exceptions and inconsistencies.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3180 Insurance LawCredit Hours: 3

This course covers the general principles of Insurance Law, emphasizing indemnity, subrogation, reinsurance, insurable interest and classification of risks. Personal, business, and legal liability including products liability and professional malpractice liability are covered. Michigan insurance law, including "no fault" legislation, will be examined as well as the contractual rights and liabilities of the insurer, insured and third party beneficiaries.

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LAW 3200 International LawCredit Hours: 3

A study of the nature, sources, and evidence of International Law; the relation of international law to national and local law; jurisdiction and international legal personality; the use of force in relations among States; the law of international agreements; and International Humanitarian and Human Rights law.
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LAW 3212 Michigan Bar Exam Essay StrategiesCredit Hours: 2

This pilot course provides third year law students with a "head start" in preparing for the essay portion of the Michigan bar examination, but is not a substitute for more comprehensive commercial bar review courses. It includes instruction on essay writing strategies and skills. Students will study the Michigan essay subjects independently in much the same manner as in the weeks immediately preceding the bar exam. Substantive lectures will be given on selected topics, primarily in the context of analyzing essay questions. Much of the classroom time will be used for essay exercises and exams.
This course is restricted to Seniors. In addition to the prerequisites listed below, it is recommended that seniors have taken Law 2100 Criminal Procedure and Law 2490 Sales. Seniors may audit for no academic credit with permission of the instructor.

Prerequisites:
LAW 1110 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1120 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1130 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1140 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1150 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3213 Multistate Bar Exam StrategiesCredit Hours: 1

This pilot course provides third year law students with a "head start" in preparing for the Multistate Bar Examination ("MBE"), but is not a substitute for more comprehensive commercial bar review courses. It includes instruction on multiple choice question strategies and skills. Students will review and study the MBE subjects and do practice questions independently in much the same manner as in the weeks immediately preceding the MBE. Some substantive lectures will be given on selected topics in the context of analyzing MBE-type questions. Much of the classroom time will be used for multiple choice exercises and exams.
This course is restricted to Seniors. In addition to the prerequisites listed below, it is recommended that seniors have taken Law 2100 Criminal Procedure and Law 2490 Sales. Seniors may audit for not academic credit with permission of the instructor. Graded Pass/No Pass.

Prerequisites:
LAW 1110 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1120 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1130 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1140 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 1150 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3230 Law of the InternetCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

A survey course intended to introduce students to the legal issues surrounding the Internet. Among the topics covered, we will address issues relating to the conflict of laws, intellectual property, on-line privacy, e-commerce, and freedom of expression.
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LAW 3250 Human Rights LawCredit Hours: 3

This course will cover the developing international norms for human rights and the evolving methods of protecting human rights according to those norms. More particularly, this course introduces the history of the international human rights movement through the drafting, ratification and implementation of the fundamental human rights covenants. It will examine the mechanisms designed to address gross human rights violations, such as United Nations reporting procedures, humanitarian intervention, and fact-finding. The use of international, regional (multilateral) and domestic adjudicative systems will be discussed to demonstrate the methods of interpreting human rights treaties and providing remedies. Lastly, we will explore the causes of human rights violations.

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LAW 3270 JurisprudenceCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course examines some of the major problems in legal philosophy. Rather than provide a survey, the focus will be on a major legal problem or topic in jurisprudential importance, such as the meaning of law and the nature of a legal system; natural law and positivism; distributive justice; fundamental principles of tort, contract and criminal responsibility; legal realism; analytical jurisprudence; or the concept of rights and duties.
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LAW 3280 American Indian LawCredit Hours: 2

This course will present a current and historical analysis of the legal relationships existing between Indian tribes, states and the United States. The students will be instructed on the operation of tribal government and court systems. The students will be introduced to the various legal issues facing Indian tribes and the people of the State of Michigan. It is the primary goal of this class to prepare students to identify potential Indian interests and issues when evaluating legal matters. It is also a goal to sensitize students to the unique status Indians have in Michigan and in the United States.
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LAW 3300 International Environmental LawCredit Hours: 2

This course will explore numerous environmental issues that have become the focus of both public and private international law, including global warming, the export of hazardous substances and environmental aspects of the North American Free Trade Agreement. Time also will be devoted to environmental developments in the European Community and to environmental aspects to international business transactions.
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LAW 3320 Law and EducationCredit Hours: 3

The study of the public provision of primary and secondary education in the United States, encompassing a range of legally-related issues such as: the inter-relationship of the Federal, state and local educational administrative entities; Establishment Clause concerns in the curriculum of public schools and the funding of private endeavors; Free Exercise challenges to the public system; liability of public and privatized educational providers; equal protection issues in access and opportunity across class, race and gender lines; students rights respecting self-expression, search and seizure, and dismissal; unionization and teacher rights; adequate education for special needs children, school financing and policy concerns; and recent proposals for reform.
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LAW 3330 Entertainment LawCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

Entertainment Law is not so much a separate body of law as it is an amalgam of the several fields of law that have major influences on the entertainment industries: contracts, intellectual property (particularly copyright but also a certain amount of trademark law), antitrust, labor law, international law, and media regulation (including the internet). What characterizes the entertainment industries as opposed to most others is that they involve the often unique products of individual talents. Thus two elements must be balanced: (1) the utilization and control of the skills and talents of these individuals and (2) the dissemination of these efforts to the public. The course will focus on these two elements and on the context of the major entertainment industries (primarily motion pictures, television, music) in which the legal problems arise.
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LAW 3331 Entertainment Law: Film and TelevisionCredit Hours: 3

This course will focus on the legal problems and issues that arise upon the production of a film or television program. The perspective of the course will be that of the lawyer for the producer, negotiating a large array of contracts. The course will have a heavy transactional focus with contracts figuring as a large part of the reading materials as well as cases and statutes. There are no prerequisites for this course.
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LAW 3350 Juvenile JusticeCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

A study of the juvenile justice system, including roles of law enforcement, schools, courts and social agencies, with emphasis on the juvenile court law and procedure. It will consider the problems which arise in the application of constitutional safeguards to the existing system. There will be discussion of trends in legislation and conflicting theories and concepts of control of delinquent behavior, and the appropriate roles to be played by components of the system.
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LAW 3360 Children and the LawCredit Hours: 3

The course looks at the legal issues relating to children and how the various legal, political, social, and economic institutions shape childhood. Particular attention will be given to the interplay between the often conflicting interests of children, parents, and the state. It will examine how the American legal system attempts to reconcile the fundamental constitutional liberty of parents with the state’s responsibility for protecting the interests of children and promoting their well-being along with the rights and interests of children. The topics that will be considered include: the scope of parental liberty as a constitutional right, children's rights and obligations, defining and creating the parent-child relationship (including adoption and child custody), children’s rights and school authority (including student speech and anti-bullying laws), child abuse and neglect and foster care, medical treatment of and medical decision-making by children, juvenile delinquency and the juvenile justice system, and the legal representation of children.

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LAW 3390 Medical MalpracticeCredit Hours: 2

This course explores the principles of the medical professional's relationship with patients, including the basic principles of relevant tort law, such as duty (standard of care), breach of duty, causation, and damages. The course may also explore such areas as tort reform, informed consent, express and implied contracts, vicarious liability, and the role of insurance.

Prerequisites:
LAW 1130 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3450 English Legal HistoryCredit Hours: 2

A survey of the origins and development of English common law, including institutional history, the growth of the legal profession, and the evolution of substantive doctrine from procedural law. The impact of social, political, and economic factors on the development of the common law is analyzed, and some consideration is given to the American reception of English common law. This survey is intended to provide students with an historical perspective for the study and practice of law.

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LAW 3451 American Legal HistoryCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course surveys American legal history from the colonial period to the present day. Students will examine a variety of major themes and topics and explore the relationships between economic, political, ideological, and social changes and the development of American law.
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LAW 3460 Local Government LawCredit Hours: 3

A study of the basic principles of law applicable to countries, cities, special districts and other forms of local government: how local governments are created; the effect of federal and state constitutions on local governments; home rule; initiative and referendum powers, elections; public meetings; public records; borrowing and tax limitations; eminent domain; police power; and governmental tort liability.
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LAW 3490 Oil and Gas LawCredit Hours: 3

This course focuses on the nature of interests in oil and gas deposits, an analysis of leases and other voluntary devices for conveying or unitizing mineral interests, and the regulatory aspects of production. The concepts relevant to this course are drawn from real and personal property law, contracts, torts, and certain aspects of administrative law. All but ten counties in Michigan have producing oil or gas wells. The purpose of this course is to prepare a student to understand the consequences of severed mineral interests, the legal and economic consequences of leases, and the protections provided to owners and producers by the regulatory system.
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LAW 3500 Patent LawCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

A study of the basic legal mechanisms of patent law for encouraging and protecting inventions with emphasis on substantive patent law; and a brief exploration of selected topics related to licensing, general procedure in the Patent Office and federal courts, federal preemption, antitrust laws and misuse of patents.
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LAW 3530 Corporate GovernanceCredit Hours: 2

This course will examine the governance of business organizations in modern corporate America, with special emphasis on the roles and responsibilities of boards of directors of public, private and not-for-profit entities. While the course will explore the limited rights of shareholders in the corporate democracy process, most of our time will be spent on director duties, as defined by the business judgment rule, duties of loyalty and care and the evolving redefinition of the relationship between boards of directors and management. The analysis will be from the perspective of the several constituencies (shareholders, management, employees, creditors and the community) affected by board conduct. Indemnification of directors, directors and officers liability insurance, the impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation, and applicable NYSE and NASDAQ's rules, will also be covered.

Prerequisites:
LAW 7230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 7360 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3590 International TaxationCredit Hours: 3

A study of the U.S. Federal Income Tax as it applies to certain international transactions. The course covers the source of income rules, the foreign tax credit and tax treaties, the taxation of Americans receiving foreign-source income, the taxation of foreigners receiving U.S.-source income, and related matters.
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LAW 3600 Commercial Real EstateCredit Hours: 3

This course provides an overview of the substantive legal and practical issues involving commercial real estate transactions. The topics of the lectures and discussions will include, but are not limited to, the following areas: Purchase agreements in commercial transactions; due diligence issues; structuring commercial loans and loan documentation reviews; comprehensive look at commercial leases; tax deferred exchanges for fee owners, tenants in common, and various other tax issues in purchasing, selling, and leasing commercial property.

Prerequisites:
LAW 1120 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3660 Advance Corporation and Partnership TaxCredit Hours: 3

This course is a continuation of Law 2530, Corporate and Partnership Tax. It will covers advanced topics in the taxation of corporations and partnerships, including corporate reorganizations, affiliated groups of corporations, partnership transfers and liquidations, and complex partnership allocations.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2520 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2530 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3670 RemediesCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

Remedies involves the study of the rules for legal and equitable remedies in civil litigation and the practical application of those rules to specific injuries to persons and to real and personal property, contract claims, constitutional violations, as well as the assessment of attorney fees and enforcement of judgments. Coverage includes issues relating to types and calculation of damage awards, limitations on damages, liquidated damages and mitigation doctrines. The course also covers issues concerning equitable remedies such as injunctions, specific performance, and restitution, including irreparable harm and the adequate remedy at law; equitable defenses, judicial discretion, and the law of contempt of court.
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LAW 3680 Sports LawCredit Hours: 2

This course addresses the individual contract of the professional athlete, the function of the Players' Union, and the role of the Agent as an intermediary between the player and the franchise with emphasis on the ethical aspects of the Agent's actions. Some aspects of internal league decisions, i.e. expansion, admission of new franchises, antitrust problems and the relationship of the league with its competition will be covered. We will also look at the effect and influence of radio, TV and cable TV on professional athletics, tort liability under certain situations, and an overview of amateur and college athletics in the generic sports picture.
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LAW 3690 Alternative Dispute ResolutionCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course is offered to students interested in acquiring knowledge of arbitration, mediation, conciliation, negotiation, client counseling and interviewing and other types of alternative dispute resolution systems and concepts distinct from traditional litigation. These systems and concepts are vital to a contemporary lawyer's practice.
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LAW 3700 US Securities RegulationCredit Hours: 3

An in-depth study of problems under the Securities Act of 1933 and the Securities Exchange Act of 1934; analysis of the evolving federal law in the areas of fraud, civil liability and management-shareholder relations; examination of the operation and requirements of the Securities and Exchange Commission.
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LAW 3730 Estate and Gift TaxationCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

The course looks at income, estate and gift taxation of gratuitous transfers, estates and trusts, including jointly-held property, pension benefits and life insurance; the tax on generation skipping transfers; and estate planning and drafting technique.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2520 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3770 Trial PracticeCredit Hours: 3

This course is designed to instruct the student on how to perceive trial issues and to develop litigation skills and an understanding of the trial process. Assigned readings and lectures will provide background for the courtroom exercises that are to be performed during class. Class attendance is mandatory. Students will play the roles of jurors, witnesses and opposing counsel. Students learn by performing, watching, critiquing and asking questions.

The main objective of this class will be for the student to use their initiative to proficiently perform the duties and functions of a trial lawyer before and during trial making good tactical and strategic decisions as an effective advocate. In this regard, the course will cover trial procedures such as developing a theory of the case, jury selection, opening statement, direct and cross-examination of witnesses, introduction of evidence, making and responding to objections, and closing arguments.

Students who are registered in or have completed Law 3880, Trial Practice NITA, are not eligible to register in this course for academic credit.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 2230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3780 Counseling and NegotiationsCredit Hours: 3

Theoretical and practical examination of principles of client counseling and negotiation. Simulations will allows students opportunity at skills development. (Combines and replaces Client Counseling and Negotiations courses).
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LAW 3782 Healthcare NegotiationCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will introduce students to the use of negotiation in healthcare, and to provide a forum for dialogue among the professions of medicine, public health and law. The course will teach students the theory and practice of negotiation. On an educated level, this course will teach students how to be aware of their own negotiation processes, both in terms of conceptualizing a negotiation problem, their behavior when negotiating and the negotiating choices they make.

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LAW 3800 Trademarks and Unfair Competition LawCredit Hours: 3

The course focuses mainly on the federal statute (the Lanham Act) and the attendant case law on trademarks, unfair competition, trademark dilution, and trademarks on the Internet.
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LAW 3830 Patent EnforcementCredit Hours: 3

This course is part of the Intellectual Property Law Institute.
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LAW 3910 Comparative Constitutional LawCredit Hours: 3

This course explores selected topics in comparative constitutional law. It begins with an overview of the methodologies and goals of comparative constitutional study. It then examines the establishment of constitutional regimes and the development of different forms of governmental structures and systems of constitutional review. Against this background, the course explores constitutional protections of human rights, including the rights of women and minority groups, religious liberty, freedom of expression and association, and economic, social, and cultural rights. Reading materials will include cases from constitutional courts in Europe, Asia, Africa, and the Americas as well as a variety of scholarly commentary.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 3920 Business CrimesCredit Hours: 2

This course examines the history and current status of efforts to control corporate business activity through criminal sanctions. It explores the major substantive and procedural issues involved and the role of attorneys in advising, prosecuting and defending corporations and business people, including their ethical responsibilities. It also considers the federal statutes' criminal provisions, including antitrust laws, securities laws, OSHA, Consumer Products Safety Act, RICO, and the fraud and abuse laws applicable to health care providers. Analysis of procedure problems, including corporate evidentiary privileges, grand jury conduct, the use of immunity grants, search warrants and subpoenas, and the interplay between criminal and civil proceedings is included.
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LAW 3950 Workers' CompensationCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

The objectives of the course will be to provide a basic understanding of the current state of workers' compensation law; to compare and contrast the underlying assumptions on which various state programs are based; to consider workers' compensation as one part of the entire socio-legal matrix; to evaluate the responsiveness to the needs of injured workers shown by existing state systems; to examine current proposals for reform; and to consider alternative approaches to the distribution of losses due to industrial injuries. Special, but not exclusive, attention will be paid to the Michigan system because of its particular assumptions and well developed litigational structure.
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LAW 3990 American Inns of CourtCredit Hours: 1

The Law School has the only Michigan charter membership in the American Inns of Court Foundation, whose goals are instilling excellence in advocacy and professionalism. Eighteen third- and fourth-year students are selected to participate in monthly meetings throughout the academic year focusing on trial techniques and ethical problems with the experienced trial attorneys and judges ("Masters of the Bench") and less experienced attorneys ("Barristers"). The attorney's extensive interaction with the "Pupils" also offers a unique opportunity to learn in the social and professional environment of the bench and bar in the Detroit legal community. Additional course information: Applications for the program must be made to the Program Administrator by May 15 preceding the student's final full year of study.
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LAW 4010 Directed ResearchCredit Hours: 1

Directed Research projects are supervised by resident faculty members. Faculty members shall not direct research for credit except in subjects in which they teach or have a particular expertise. Every student shall submit a rough draft of the paper. The instructor shall review the rough draft and make necessary corrections and suggestions. These should include direction of research, organization, legal reasoning and writing style. Detailed comments should be provided.

The research paper should be in acceptable law review form, unless good reason dictates otherwise. Proper citations, correct use of signals, and law review caliber writing style should be required. A student receiving one (1) hour credit should submit a paper of approximately 20 pages, exclusive of footnotes. A student writing for one hour credit should expect to put in about 45 to 60 hours work.

Students are required to possess a GPA of at least 2.50 or better to be eligible to participate in a Directed Research project for academic credit.

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LAW 4020 Directed ResearchCredit Hours: 2

Directed Research projects are supervised by resident faculty members. Faculty members shall not direct research for credit except in subjects in which they teach or have a particular expertise. Every student shall submit a rough draft of the paper. The instructor shall review the rough draft and make necessary corrections and suggestions. These should include direction of research, organization, legal reasoning and writing style. Detailed comments should be provided.
The research paper should be in acceptable law review form, unless good reason dictates otherwise. Proper citations, correct use of signals, and law review caliber writing style should be required. A student receiving two (2) hours credit should submit a paper of 40 pages, exclusive of footnotes. A student writing for two hours credit should expect to put in about 90-120 hours of work. A student writing for more than two hours credit shall work out arrangements with the supervising committee as to length of the paper and hours to be devoted to it.
Students are required to possess a GPA of at least 2.50 or better to be eligible to participate in a Directed Research project for academic credit.
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LAW 4040 Law ReviewCredit Hours: 1

Law Review is a team of highly motivated scholarly law students dedicated to publishing a diversified, high-caliber legal journal; to enhancing the reputation of the University of Detroit Mercy School of law and Law Review; and to developing the skills of its members. Members of Law Review generate their strength from their commitment to the School's and Law Review's reputation, their readers, their authors and themselves. Additional course information: Requires eligibility determination.

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LAW 4046 Law Review On-line EditorCredit Hours: 2

The individual in this position acts as the on-line Editor for Law Review.

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LAW 4120 Selected Problems in Entertainment Law SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will undertake an in-depth exploration of selected topics in entertainment law. Students will be expected to research, write, and present a significant scholarly paper on an appropriate topic.
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LAW 4150 Selected Problems in Environmental Law SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will undertake an in-depth exploration of selected topics in environmental law. Students will be expected to research, write, and present a significant scholarly paper on an appropriate topic.

Law 3160 Environmental Law is a pre-requisite for this Seminar.
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LAW 4160 Selected Topics in Bankruptcy Seminar -- Evolving Issues in Business Insolvency CasesCredit Hours: 2

This Seminar class is an opportunity for students to explore the changing face of business insolvencies in Michigan since the economic meltdown of 2008. The class will address bankruptcy issues affecting businesses, the effects of the 2005 revisions to the Bankruptcy Code (BAPCPA) on business bankruptcy cases, and non-bankruptcy alternatives to dealing with failing or failed businesses, including banks' responses to same. Students will develop and complete a research paper on issues involved in business insolvency matters. It is recommended that students have taken Secured Transactions, or Business Organizations, or some other course which addresses commercial law matters prior to, or concurrent with this class.
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LAW 4240 Selected Topics in Constitutional Law -- First Amendment SeminarCredit Hours: 2

In the landmark case of Schenck v. U.S. Justice Holmes famously wrote that "When a nation is at war many things that might be said in time of peace are such a hindrance to its effort that their utterance will not be endured so long as men fight." With this statement Holmes recognized a basic truism in U.S. law, in times of crisis government power expands and individual liberties, particularly the liberty to criticize government policies, contract. Surveying the course of U.S. history, from the cases stemming from the Sedition Act during the first Adams administration to those currently arising from the USA PATRIOT ACT during the "Global War on Terror," this course examines many of the great cases that have determined the limits of free expression during times of national fear and military conflict.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2060 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4310 Selected Topics in Criminal Law Seminar: Sex, Drugs & Rock n' RollCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will examine current issues of importance in the area of federal and state criminal law. These issues will be varied, expansive and will include, for example: 1) retroactivity of sentencing law changes; 2) the use of forfeiture by the law enforcement; 3) regulating/prosecuting fraud in the financial industry; 4) the problems associated with concealment of exculpatory evidence; 5) exonerations of the wrongfully convicted; 6) over-criminalization of conduct; and 7) how to deal with "tax havens" and those who "hide" money there.

Students will be expected to research, write, and present a significant scholarly paper on one of these topics (or another approved by the instructor).


Prerequisites:
LAW 1140 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 7230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 7360 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4330 Selected Topics in Immigration Law SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This Seminar is designed to allow students who have already taken the basic course in Immigration Law (LAW 2960) to research and write a substantial paper on a topic in this area. Rather than operating as an advanced course, students will be free to pick from a wide range of possible issues on the cutting edge of the field, including: comprehensive immigration reform, refugee policy, Constitutional issues surrounding birthright citizenship and deportation, and the role of states in the immigration system. In addition, students may propose their own topics but in all cases the student and instructor must mutually agree upon the topic. Evaluation will occur primarily through the final research paper presented at the end of the term.

Prerequisites:
LAW 6230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4350 Selected Topics in Labor Law Seminar Alternative Dispute ResolutionsCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will examine selected topics in Michigan public sector labor law both in government and public education. There is no prerequisite for the course but having taken either a private or public sector labor law class would be helpful.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2390 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4380 Selected Topics in Family Law SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will undertake an in-depth exploration of selected topics in Family Law. Students will be expected to research, write, and present a significant scholarly paper on an appropriate topic.
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LAW 4390 Spirituality and the Law SeminarCredit Hours: 2

The law is, or can be, a healing profession. Our clients are often in great physical, emotional, or spiritual pain. This course will help attorneys serve the needs of their clients and their own needs. The course will train attorneys, regardless of their faith or personal convictions, to approach their clients from a holistic and Jesuit perspective and, in doing so, examine and serve their clients legal, human and spiritual needs. The course will help attorneys to use their spirituality as a means of healing themselves in order to avoid and recover from the stress of the practice of law and the negative effects of working with clients who have suffered physical and emotional abuse. This course is not an ethics course.
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LAW 4400 Selected Topics in Health Law SeminarCredit Hours: 2

The seminar will focus on two important topics in practice of health law: litigation under the Civil False Claims Act, and the advent of "accountable care organizations." The first topic, addressing what are known as qui tam actions, involves one of the most important tools used by the Federal Government and by whistleblowers in fighting fraud and abuse. The second topic looks at new entities that typically provide organized care to a group of patients using "evidence based medicine." In order to understand "accountable care organizations" one must deal with virtually every aspect of the practice of corporate health care. Successful completion of the Health Law survey course is recommended.
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LAW 4410 Selected Topics in Property Law: Animal Rights SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will undertake an in-depth exploration of selected topics in Animal Law, with an emphasis on animal rights and animal welfare. Students will be expected to research, write, and present a significant scholarly paper on an appropriate topic.
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LAW 4521 Law and Cyberspace SeminarCredit Hours: 3

The seminar will examine the application of current laws to the Internet and a variety of proposals for new or revised laws to regulate the developing global information infrastructure. Topics will include recent applications of defamation, copyright, wire fraud and criminal threat laws to Internet activities; current proposals from both government and private sources for new legal regulation or revision of current intellectual property; communications; criminal laws; the problems that flow from asserting national laws in a medium with no national borders. The assigned texts will include conventional documents and research material available on-line. Students do not need their own computers to take the seminar, since it will be possible to complete all assignments using the Law Library's computer resources. A substantial research paper and a significant in-class presentation are required.

Prerequisites:
LAW 3210 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4540 Selected Topics in Professional Responsibility SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will undertake an in depth exploration of selected ethical issues concerning the professional responsibility of lawyers, as well as examine some ways in which lawyers can utilize their legal skills in working toward the promotion of social justice in our society. Students will be expected to research, write, and present a significant scholarly paper on an appropriate topic.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2470 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 2480 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4660 Selected Topics in Criminal Procedure SeminarCredit Hours: 2

The purpose of this course is to survey, in a relaxed and academic manner, the statutes, cases, and ideas that govern the prosecution and defense of federal crimes. The focus of our course will be federal trial and appellate court decisions construing federal criminal statutes. Because of the prominent role of federal agencies, and federal courts (and especially the Supreme Court) in this area of law, we will focus much attention on those resources in addition to reviewing the elements of the statutes. Pay close attention to both the statutes and the opinions of the courts that interpret them, as we will often refer to them in class.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2100 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4661 Selected Topics in Copyright Law: International Copyright RelationsCredit Hours: 2

The seminar will focus on the recognition and enforcement of copyrights internationally. Copyright is a creature of statute, thus the reach of copyright laws extends beyond the border only through the mechanisms of treaties and international agreements. The seminar will include the study on the major international copyright treaties, including the Berne Convention, the WTO TRIPS Agreement, and WIPO Copyright Treaty and the WIPO Phonograms Treaty, as well as problems in transnational issues relating to copyright.
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LAW 4690 Selected Problems in Evidence SeminarCredit Hours: 2

Advanced study of current problems in the law of evidence. Each student is required to conduct the necessary research and prepare a paper suitable for publication, analyzing in depth a discrete subject area in the law of evidence. In addition, the seminarian will deliver an oral presentation and lead a discussion on the subject.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4700 Selected Problems in Torts SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will undertake an in-depth exploration of selected topics in Tort Law. Students will be expected to research, write, and present a significant scholarly paper on an appropriate topic.

Prerequisites:
LAW 1130 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 4861 Selected Topics in Commercial Law - Lender Liability SeminarCredit Hours: 2

This seminar will explore emerging theories of lender liability and in particular, those based on breach of contract, fraud, breach of fiduciary liability, interference, negligence and other tort theories. In addition, lender liability under environmental laws will also be explored. Students will be expected to select a topic for study, research, write and present a significant scholarly paper on the topic selected.
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LAW 5010 Urban Law ClinicCredit Hours: 4

Students represent indigent clients in a variety of civil matters. Students appear in courts on civil matters and conduct administrative hearings. Students handle legal matters for senior clients, including drafting wills and powers of attorney, and addressing consumer and health issues. The Clinic includes a classroom instructional component on skills, including interviewing and counseling, litigation, ethics and trial techniques. This course includes a two hour class each week and 12 office hours that must be met during the week. Office hours include work done outside the office.
In addition to the prerequisite, a student must have completed 30 credit hours to enroll. LAW 2210 Elder Law or LAW 3020 Administrative Law are highly recommended.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5020 Criminal Trial ClinicCredit Hours: 3

Students represent misdemeanor defendants in district courts. The course prepares students for all practical aspects of criminal defense, including bonds, arraignments, discovery, preliminary examinations, pre-trial motions, plea negotiations, and sentencing guidelines. Students will interview clients, review discovery, prepare motions, conduct plea negotiations and appear on the record. LAW 1140 Criminal Law and LAW 2100 Criminal Procedure are highly recommended.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 2230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5030 State Appellate Defenders Office (SADO) Criminal Advocacy ClinicCredit Hours: 3 OR 4

In the clinic, students will work on plea appeals and will prepare a criminal appellate brief to be submitted to the circuit court, Michigan Court of Appeals or Michigan Supreme Court under the supervision of attorneys from the State Appellate Defender Office. The students will meet with the client (at the prison or jail or by means of video conference), will prepare motions and briefs, and will have the chance to argue in the circuit court and/or Court of Appeals pursuant to Michigan Court Rule 8.120. The classroom component of the course consists of writing, mock arguments and discussion of strategy and case law pertaining to plea and sentencing claims. This course involves appeals from plea-based convictions only. The students should expect to work on their assigned cases from 8-10 hours per week outside the classroom.

The course is limited to 8 students.

Prerequisites:
LAW 1140 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2100 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5060 Immigration Law ClinicCredit Hours: 3 OR 4

Students will represent immigrants seeking a variety of relief and benefits, including family sponsorship, Violence Against Women Act petitions, and Special Immigrant Juvenile Status. Students will also represent clients in trials before the U.S. Immigration Court and hearings before the U.S. Department of Homeland Security. Students write appellate briefs to the Board of Immigration Appeals and the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Sixth Circuit. The classroom component has substantive instruction in interviewing, litigation, and appellate advocacy skills, as well as attorney-client relations, ethics, and case strategy. This clinic is designed for students with an interest in practicing Immigration Law. This course includes a two hour class each week and 12 office hours that must be met during the week. Office hours include work done outside the office.

The Evidence prerequisite may be waived if taken contemporaneously. Immigration Law or US and Canadian Immigration Law is a pre-requisite for this Clinic.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2200 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 2230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2960 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 6230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5061 Advanced Immigration Law ClinicCredit Hours: 2

An Advanced Immigration Law Clinic for 2 credit hours is available to students who have completed the 4 hour Immigration Law Clinic course. The Advanced Clinic allows for continued in depth case work assignments, and an opportunity for more self-directed work in an area of the student's choice.

Numerically graded.


Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 2230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 2960 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 6230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5070 Mediation TrainingCredit Hours: 2

Students develop mediation skills while at the same time completing the 40-hour training which is one of the requirements to be a court-approved mediator. The class consists of lectures, discussions, drills and exercises on various areas of mediation.

Graded on Pass/No Pass basis.
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LAW 5071 Mediation ClinicCredit Hours: 2

Students engage in actual mediation sessions in Michigan courts. Students develop their skills in helping parties resolve conflicts amicably and without resort to trial or other judicial proceedings.
Graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 5070 (Minimum Grade of P, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5080 Mortgage Foreclosure Defense ClinicCredit Hours: 3 OR 4

Students represent victims of predatory lending practices in federal and state courts to stop homeowners from losing their homes due to foreclosure. Clinic students handle cases involving mortgage fraud, foreclosure rescue scams, and loan servicing errors. They have the opportunity to interview clients, argue motions, negotiate settlements, and conduct trials. In addition, students engage in community outreach through presentations and development of written materials to educate homeowners on foreclosure remedy options and rescue scams.
The classroom component will examine the causes of the foreclosure crisis, consumer protection laws for mortgage consumers, and policy responses. We also will cover practice skills such as client interviewing, fact investigation, case planning, legal research, and pre-trial litigation. This 4 credit hours course includes a two-hour class and 12 clinic office hours each week.
Law 2220, Evidence is a pre-requisite

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5100 Juvenile Law Appellate ClinicCredit Hours: 3

The Clinic will involve students representing children in appeals to the Michigan Court of Appeals from trial court proceedings in the Wayne County Juvenile Court. The appeals will almost exclusively involve child protective proceedings (abuse and neglect) but there may also be some exposure to juvenile delinquency proceedings and appeals of those cases.

The Clinic will involve learning appellate procedures through written exercises and drafting a brief to be submitted to the Michigan Court of Appeals. Students will also have the opportunity to argue the Appeal to a panel of expert attorneys and under recent changes made to MCR 8.120, they may potentially have the opportunity to argue the appeal to the Court of Appeals. The Juvenile Law Appellate Clinic offers an excellent opportunity to develop advanced writing skills and to prepare for imminent practice. It is scheduled to accommodate evening students. LAW 2240 Family Law is strongly recommended.
The prerequisite may be waived if taken contemporaneously.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5110 Youth Justice ClinicCredit Hours: 3

The Youth Justice Clinic will provide students with an opportunity to represent indigent youth in juvenile courts in the Detroit area. The Clinic will predominantly be a litigation clinic and its mission will be to provide client-centered representation to youth in all aspects of delinquency proceeding from preliminary inquiry to disposition. This Clinic will allow students to learn how to practice ethically, think independently, synthesize facts and legal principles and plan litigation strategies. Students will appear in court regularly for preliminary inquiries, pre-trial conferences and various hearings. In addition to interviewing clients, investigating facts and negotiating a case, the students will conduct motions and adjudications. Clinic students will work closely with the youth, their families, schools, communities and social service providers to address additional client needs. LAW 3350 Juvenile Justice or LAW 2100 Criminal Procedure are highly recommended.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 5160 ExternshipCredit Hours: 1 TO 3

Students must speak with the Externship Director prior to being referred to an extern placement. Students must also be accepted for the position by the Judge/Agency prior to registering for the Externship Clinic. Students perform a minimum of 120 hours or a maximum of 180 hours during the semester.  Students meet as a class each week and submit time/action reports, keep journals, and write a paper at the end of their experience.

Students will be required to possess an overall GPA of 2.50 for upperclass students and a 2.80 for rising second-year students to be eligible for an Externship. Students are allowed to enroll in up to two Externships for academic credit.

Graded on a Pass/No Pass basis.
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LAW 5200 Veterans' ClinicCredit Hours: 3 OR 4

Students participating in the Veterans Clinic will have the opportunity to represent military veterans and their families in disability cases and related matters. Students primarily will practice before the Department of Veterans Affairs to obtain veterans benefits for service-connected disabilities. The work will include opportunities for interviewing veterans and conducting educational presentations in Michigan and around the country, with Project SALUTE.
In addition to learning and practicing substantive veterans law, students will have the opportunity to learn and develop more general lawyering skills such as client interviewing and counseling, advocacy writing, and negotiating.
This 3 credit hours course includes a two-hour class and 9 clinic office hours each week, as well an orientation on substantive veterans law. Law 2220, Evidence, is recommended, but not required.
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LAW 5211 Appellate Veterans' ClinicCredit Hours: 3

This clinic class allows students to represent disabled veterans and/or their dependants before the U.S. Court of Appeals for Veterans Claims (CAVC) in disability compensation appellate cases. Students will have the opportunity to obtain appellate litigation experience while performing pro bono service. They will also be learning the expectations, methods and technical aspects of representation before the CAVC.

The CAVC Clinic will integrate administrative law and forensic medicine and will require students to interview, investigate, research and develop the law and facts so a to pursue appeals by writing and filing the opening briefs and reply briefs for the Appellant. The clinic will discuss litigation strategy, Rule 33 Conference Hearings, Court rules, electronic case filing and issue framing. Potential appeals to higher courts will also be analyzed. Some cases handled by the students may involve oral argument before a three judge panel at the CAVC and the opportunity to create new precedent. The Court is relatively new and many issues are still of first impression.

Interns will meet weekly for the classroom component and are obligated to spend an average of nine office hours per week on their cases. This work will sharpen analytical skills and allow the students to become more confident in their interaction with clients and in their successfully pursuing appellate claims in the CAVC.

Numerically graded.
Although students in the Veterans' Clinic on rare occasions handle a CAVC case, in the newer add-on CAVC Clinic, the students will be only working on appellate cases. These cases are more complex than the usual disability cases handled by the Veterans' Clinic.

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LAW 5220 Patent Procurement ClinicCredit Hours: 4

Prereq: Students must successfully have completed all required first-year courses and Patent Law (Law 3500), and have completed or concurrently be taking Professional Responsibility (Law 2470). Students also must be in good academic standing and have at least a cumulative 2.5 grade point average. Preference will be given to graduating students and students who have not previously taken a live-client clinic.

Technical Prerequisites: Students must meet PTO qualifications for participation, including at least a bachelors degree in a recognized technical subject such as biology, chemistry, computer science, engineering, and physics.

Students in this clinic represent clients in patent procurement matters before the United States Patent and Trademark Office's Detroit, Michigan Satellite Office. Students' work will include interviewing and counseling clients, fact investigation, performing legal research, conducting prior art searches, and drafting and prosecuting patent applications. Students learn the skills and values needed to effectively represent clients in patent procurement matters. Students also explore substantive areas of patent law that arise in the matters they are handling. In addition, students explore professional responsibility issues commonly faced by patent attorneys, such as conflicts, competence, and confidentiality. The Patent Procurement Clinic ("PPC") is a one-semester clinic graded on a Pass/No Pass basis. The PPC satisfies the professional skills requirement but not the upper class writing requirement. In a typical semester, enrollment in the clinic will be limited to 8 students.
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LAW 5221 Advanced Patent Procurement ClinicCredit Hours: 2

Prereq: Completion of Patent Procurement Clinic (PPC)(Law 5220); Approval of instructor; Students will be graded on an Honors-Pass-Low Pass-No Credit basis.
Students in this clinic represent clients in patent procurement matters before the United States Patent and Trademark Office's Detroit, Michigan, Satellite Office. There is no classroom component in the Advanced Patent Procurement Clinic. Students will be expected to spend between five to ten hours per week continuing work on ongoing cases that have significant deadlines during the semester, gaining increased experience in different settings and addressing more complex issues. Advanced Clinic students will also work with PPC faculty to provide direction and guidance to those enrolled in the PPC Clinic for the first time, in areas in which Advanced Clinic students have already acquired some expertise. Time spent in the Advanced Clinic will include a one-hour weekly meeting with the Clinic's faculty to discuss the status of client matters.
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LAW 5300 Intellectual Property ClinicCredit Hours: 3

Under the supervision of patent attorneys registered to practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), students will write patent applications for needy inventors. Students will interview an inventor, prepare drawings and a description for a patentability search, evaluate the patentability search results, prepare drawing layouts for a patent application for the inventor, and write all parts of the specifications including claims for the invention. Applications will be filed with the PTO. If an office action arrives at an appropriate time, the students will then prepare a response to the office action.

Law 3500, Patent Law is the pre-requisite. Students must also possess an undergraduate or post-secondary degree in the science field.

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LAW 5311 Advanced Intellectual Property ClinicCredit Hours: 2

Under the supervision of patent attorneys registered to practice before the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (PTO), students will write patent applications for needy inventors. Students will interview an inventor, prepare drawings and a description for a patentability search, evaluate the patentability search results, prepare drawing layouts for a patent application for the inventor, and write all parts of the specifications including claims for the invention. Applications will be filed with the PTO. If an office action arrives at an appropriate time, the students will then prepare a response to the office action.

Law 5300, Intellectual Property Clinic, is a pre-requisite.


Prerequisites:
LAW 3500 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 6000 Advanced AdvocacyCredit Hours: 2

Advanced Advocacy was designed and is taught from the perspective that advocacy is more than applied skill; in its purest form, advocacy is a form of art. This class takes students beyond the traditional moot court curriculum and thoroughly examines the art and various techniques of persuasion through innovative exercises and guest lectures. Although the class is required for all Moot Court members, the persuasion techniques taught in this class are so universal to the practice of law that all upper-class students are encouraged to enroll. Students must have an overall GPA of 2.5 to register for academic credit. This course, which will be numerically graded, meets the upper-level writing program.
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LAW 6010 Moot Court Executive BoardCredit Hours: 1

The Moot Court Board of Advocates is the student organization responsible for our moot court program, which is designed to develop and hone written and oral advocacy skills. Each year the Board administers several internal moot court competitions, sponsors all external moot court teams, hosts motion calls and appellate hearings for various Michigan courts, and trains first-year moot court competitors. Students with strong persuasion, leadership, and organizational skills are encouraged to tryout for the board during the summer term to serve during the following academic year. All students who have completed their first year and have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above are eligible to apply. Students who are selected to board membership may then enroll for this credit. Additional course information: Enrollment limited to members officially named to the Board
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LAW 6020 Moot Court Associate BoardCredit Hours: 1

This board is selected to serve as the leaders of the Moot Court Board as Associate Directors. Additional course information: Enrollment limited to members elected to this position. Students must have an overall GPA of 2.5 to register for academic credit in this course.
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LAW 6030 Moot Court BoardCredit Hours: 1

This Board is selected to serve as leaders of the Moot Court Board of Advocates as Executive Directors.
Additional course information: Enrollment limited to members elected to this position. Students must have an overall GPA of 2.5 to register for academic credit in this course.
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LAW 6040 Ernie Goodman Mock Trial TournamentCredit Hours: 1

The Ernie Goodman Mock Trial Tournament is hosted by the Moot Court Board of Advocates and named for one of Michigan's finest trial attorneys and civil rights advocates, Mr. Ernie Goodman. Competitors, in teams of two, are required to attend two meetings and two workshops, to produce a trial notebook, and to try the competition case at least twice (once as plaintiff and once as defendant) in the preliminary rounds of the tournament. The trial will be evaluated by judges and attorneys who act as judge and jury. Two teams will then advance to the final round, with cash prizes available. The corequisite for the course for academic credit is Evidence. Students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above to enroll in this competition. (Students without the corequisites may compete, but not register for academic credit. See the competition rules to be published.)
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LAW 6050 Patrick A. Keenan Memorial Appellate Advocacy TournamentCredit Hours: 1

The Patrick A. Keenan Memorial Appellate Advocacy Tournament is an internal moot court competition administrated by UDM's Moot Court Board of Advocates. The tournament is a team competition and all students will write the brief and compete in oral rounds as a 2-person team. Students will participate in a series of oral argument workshops and be assigned a coach from the Moot Court Board of Advocates to prepare for the actual tournament. The focus of this tournament will be an issue (hot topic) taken from a case(s) currently pending and/or up on a petition for a writ of certiorari before the United States Supreme Court or an issue which is creating some attention in the federal circuits. Competition is open to ALL upperclassmen that have a minimum cumulative GPA of 2.5. Competition is MANDATORY for all Junior members of the Moot Court Board of Advocates, with the exception of the small number of 2L students who are serving on national teams. Students are responsible for finding a partner and attending all meetings and workshops. One (1) academic credit is available for students completing the brief and competing in all oral rounds of the tournament. Other prizes and awards may be available in the tournament. All participants are strongly encouraged to take LAW 6000 Advanced Advocacy before registering for this competition.
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LAW 6070 External National Moot Court Competition TeamsCredit Hours: 2

Each year the Moot Court Board of Advocates sponsors competitive teams that travel across the country to argue mock appellate cases against law students from other American and Canadian law schools. In the past, substantive law topics have included Civil Rights, Constitutional Law, Employment Law, Entertainment Law, Environmental Law, International Law, and Tax Law. Team members are selected to serve on a competitive team in the Fall or Winter. In the semester of their competition, two- to four-member teams will write an appellate brief and prepare oral arguments that will be heard before a mock appellate court. Students will then travel to the host school and present their arguments over the course of one weekend. Advanced Advocacy is a pre- or co-requisite, and students must have a cumulative grade point average of 2.5 or above to tryout and compete.
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LAW 6120 External National Trial Advocacy Team CompetitionCredit Hours: 2

Each year a team of four students compete in a National Trial Advocacy team competition. The students participate in the trial of a criminal case such as First Degree Murder in October during the Fall semester. In the competition, four team members participate in two-person teams as either prosecutors or defenders. When not participating in the competition as advocates, the non-advocate students play the role of witnesses. All team members review a case problem with over 100 pages of transcripts, witness statements, police reports and exhibits and develop a theory of the case. All members participate in creating an opening statement, two direct examinations, two cross examinations and a closing argument. Students will travel to the host school and present their arguments over the course of one weekend. Evidence and Trial Practice are pre-requisites. Students must be available to practice with other team members at least two to three times a week during the eight weeks leading up to the competition.
Students need at least an overall GPA of 2.5 to enroll.

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LAW 6130 National Transactional LawMeet CompetitionCredit Hours: 1

A team of three students will be selected to participate in the National Transactional LawMeet Competition held during the Winter Term. Teams from participating law schools across the country work on a common transactional problem as counsel for one of the parties to the transaction. Based on the facts of the case statement and interviews with the client, each team will prepare a contract to meet the client's needs and objectives in the transaction, and then negotiate the terms of the contract with a team from another school representing a different party to the transaction in a regional competition held in late February. Both the negotiations and written work will be judged by experienced transactional attorneys, and the winners in the regional competitions compete in the national competition held in April.

Prequisites: Law 2010 Business Organizations, 4 credits
Law 7360 Anatomy of a Business Transaction Law Firm Program, 3 credits

Prerequisites:
LAW 7230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 7360 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 6220 Federal Criminal LawCredit Hours: 3

This course will explore the nature and scope of the substantive federal criminal law, giving particular attention to the federal government's role in proscribing crimes of violence, drug crimes, and other street-level criminal activity. The course will begin by examining the bases for federal criminal jurisdiction and the constitutional and policy debates that have attended the increasing federalization of crime. Students will then begin a study of specific federal crimes, including select federal homicides; drug crime; firearms offenses; and serious crimes against the state, including treason, espionage, and the criminal laws relating to terrorism. Students will also explore group criminality and the substantive provisions that enable federal prosecution of violent criminal organizations, including federal conspiracy and racketeering law. The course thus seeks to give students a deeper understanding of American criminal law and of the unique legal and policy issues associated with Congress's definition of it.
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LAW 6230 United States and Canadian Immigration LawCredit Hours: 3 OR 4

The course will cover the fundamentals of immigration law in Canada and the U.S. The course will focus on content most applicable to a cross-border practice and, in particular, Canadian and U.S. nonimmigrant and immigrant visa processes (with particular focus on TN visas for Canadians), grounds of inadmissibility and deportability in each country and strategies to challenge inadmissibility, as well as refugee and asylum claims (with emphasis on the Safe Third Country Agreement between Canada and the U.S.). The course will provide practical, relevant information and strategies to serve the real-life needs of potential clients. Guest speakers will include staff from border agencies, the Canadian and U.S. Consulates, and cross-border immigration attorneys. This course and Immigration Law will cover much of the same information and both courses will prepare students for the Immigration Law Clinic and the Immigration Law Firm Program.
Students may take either U.S. and Canadian immigration Law or LAW 2960 Immigration Law but not both.
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LAW 6290 Judicial Clerkship CourseCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course provides students with an intensive and advanced research and writing experience. It will prepare students who are interested in pursuing a judicial clerkship, as well as expose students to the advanced legal skills necessary to be a successful attorney. Students will be required to prepare two drafts of at least three written assignments: a bench memorandum, a ruling on a trial motion, and an appellate decision. Students will be required to meet with the professor and discuss their drafts prior to submitting final products. Students will also be required to complete a number of short advanced research exercises. Classroom discussions will cover research and writing strategies, the substantive legal issues the students are addressing, and law clerk ethics and procedures.
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LAW 6341 Military Law and the Uniform Code of Military JusticeCredit Hours: 3

This course will introduce and explore the legal system within the United States military, with particular emphasis on the current practice of criminal law under the Uniform Code of Military Justice (UCMJ). The course will be divided between the four main areas of military law: administrative; operational; legal assistance; and military justice, with approximately 50% of course time being spent on military justice. Potential topics to be covered include non-judicial punishment; military orders; rules of engagement; assisting service members with civil legal matters; the Servicemembers’ Civil Relief Act (SCRA); the Uniformed Services Employment and Reemployment Rights Act (USERRA); the prosecution and defense of military criminal cases under the UCMJ; and the incorporation of state and local law such as in the prosecution of Article 134 child pornography violations.

Prerequisites: None, but Criminal Procedure and Evidence are beneficial.

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LAW 6350 Litigation TechnologyCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will teach law students interested in becoming trial lawyers how to integrate technology into their trial presentations. Students will learn how to apply principles of persuasion to the creation of courtroom visuals which they will then present in the trial advocacy portion of the course. The course will use hypothetical problems and cases to allow students to develop presentations that persuade and will include six weeks of computer lab sections and lecture. The remaining eight weeks will be devoted to student participation in advocacy exercises and trials with instructor critique. Students will try both a civil case and a criminal case in this course. Students should own their own laptop computers and be prepared to bring them to class every week. The machine must be Windows-compatible.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 6360 Cross Border Sales and Financing TransactionsCredit Hours: 4 TO 8

This 8-credit course, spanning Terms I and II, is a dual degree course offering that is designed around a uniform, cross border sale of goods transaction. The course integrates the substantive legal and business topics in a real world setting and provides a comparative analysis of problem solutions in the context of U.S. and Canadian law.

Term I will focus primarily on the sales aspects of the transaction, including contract formation, performance of the contract, and remedies. Term II will focus on the financing aspects of the transaction, including the types of financing available, the mechanisms available for obtaining a security interest, and the priorities of various creditors in the event of a default by the debtor. This is a required course for third year students in the dual degree program. J.D. students may elect to take either or both term offerings, on a space available basis.

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LAW 6370 Advanced Legal ResearchCredit Hours: 2

Advanced Legal Research covers both federal and Michigan legal research resources. A host of formats and databases will be taught, to include Westlaw and LexisNexis (new and traditional interfaces), other popular subscription databases, free legal Websites, and print resources (when required by law firms).

Students will become proficient in cost-effective research as well as how to effectively use a combination of online and print resources (integrated research). Emphasis will be placed on developing a research plan. Legal resources that will be taught include secondary sources, case law and digests, statutes, administrative law, court rules, court and practice forms, citator services, mass-citator services, ordinances, and legislative histories.

As this course relies heavily on the completion of hands-on exercises, students must own a laptop or loan one for the semester. Students are required to bring a laptop to every class -- no exceptions. In addition, there is a live final exam that requires the use of a laptop. Not having a laptop for the final exam will result in a zero grade for the exam.

Law 1080 Applied Legal Theory and Analysis or Law 1070 Comparative Legal Writing and Research are prerequisites.

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LAW 6390 International Law of CyberspaceCredit Hours: 2

This course will examine the international legal and institutional framework pertaining to Cyber Space Governance and Cyber Warfare. Potential topics to be covered include theories of international cooperation and governance, sovereignty, human rights, espionage, terrorism, responsibility of States for internationally wrongful acts, ius ad bellum (use of force, self-defense) and ius in bello (distinction, proportionality, and neutrality) applied to computer network attacks and exploitations involving States and non-State actors. Additionally, the course will provide an overview of the history of Cyber operations as well as examples taken from the Cyber policy and strategy of the 5 permanent members of the United Nations Security Council.

Prerequisite: Public International Law is recommended.

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LAW 6400 National Security LawCredit Hours: 3

The primary focus is on the war against terrorism by understanding executive and congressional national security powers under the Constitution and case law; domestic tools for fighting and investigating terrorism and other national security threats, with a focus on surveillance and other counterterrorism measures; prosecuting terrorists in the federal courts; detention and trial of terrorists by military commissions; and the domestic use of the military in law enforcement.
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LAW 7020 Intellectual Property Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will provide students the opportunity to engage in identifying and addressing various Intellectual Property (IP) issues that will arise in a simulated corporate transaction. Students will assume the role of an associate in a law firm and handle certain IP aspects of the sale of the assets of a business. For example, they will engage in due diligence of IP assets, review and draft documents, conduct research, and watch and critique simulated client meetings and negotiations. Research and drafting exercises will be assigned on a weekly basis.
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LAW 7050 Health Law Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will provide students the opportunity to engage in a simulated corporate health care transaction between a nonprofit hospital and a physician. Students will assume the role of an associate in a law firm and represent the hospital in its efforts to recruit a physician to the hospital's community by offering the physician financial incentives such as a guaranteed practice income and free malpractice insurance. Students will advise the hospital on the key legal considerations in entering into such an arrangement and then negotiate and draft the necessary documents to complete the transaction. Students will have the opportunity to communicate regularly with their "client." Research and drafting exercises will be assigned on a weekly basis.
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LAW 7080 Family Law Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will give the students the opportunity to take a divorce from complaint to judgment and then work on post-judgment issues. Students will assume the role of an associate assisting the family law partner in a large law firm. Issues covered will include asset discovery and valuation, child custody and support, spousal support, parenting time issues, paternity and post-judgment issues. Students will draft memos, complaints, discovery documents, motions, orders and judgment. Quizzes and/or writing assignments will be done weekly.

There are no prerequisites but the professor recommends that the students will achieve more from the class if the general Family Law Course is taken prior.

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LAW 7090 Immigration Law Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will provide students the background to evaluate the immigration-related impact of a simulated corporate transaction. Students will gain an understanding of commonly used U.S. work visa categories, employment-based immigration, immigration-related employer compliance, and issues raised when a business is reorganized, acquired or merged. Students will engage in due diligence, review and draft analyses, conduct research, and interview company employees to recommend steps to be taken to keep both employees and the business in compliance in a multinational business context. Either LAW 2960 Immigration Law or LAW 6230 U.S. and Canadian Immigration Law will satisfy the prerequisite.

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LAW 7110 Purchase and Sale of Commercial Real Estate Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

Students will examine and participate in various aspects of a simulated transaction involving the sale and purchase of commercial real estate. Topics will be selected from some of the following broader areas: structuring and planning, letters of intent and term sheets, purchase and sale agreements, leases, financing, easements and other interests, title insurance and survey matters, closing documents, and other areas relating to a commercial real estate transaction. Students will engage in the type of work that a law firm associate would handle, including document review, research, drafting and negotiation. Research and drafting exercises will be assigned on a weekly basis. Though students who take this course will not be required to take Purchase and Sale of Commercial Real Estate II, a better learning experience will result if students enroll in both semesters.

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LAW 7130 Environmental Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 3

This course explores the environmental issues that may arise in the transfer of a business. Students will learn how to implement, supervise and assess environmental due diligence issues: draft and review confidentiality agreements, environmental contract language, restrictive covenants and access agreements. The pressure to "do the deal" in a limited time frame with limited resources will be examined. Students need not have taken the Corporate Transactions LFP or the Advanced Corporate Transactions LFP to take this course.
Law 3160 Environmental Law is a prerequisite or corequisite.

Prerequisites:
LAW 3160 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 7140 Litigation Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2

This course will provide students the opportunity to engage in simulated litigation practice relating to the post-acquisition operation of a soap manufacturing company. Students will assume the role of an associate in a law firm, participating in certain aspects of the prosecution or defense of various civil claims. Students will have the opportunity to communicate regularly with the senior partner on the matter. Research and drafting exercises will be assigned throughout the course. The course is designed to expose students to the forces they will likely encounter in actual litigation practice: time pressure, communication challenges, uncertainty and lack of information, and organizational dynamics in the client and the firm.

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LAW 7160 Small Firm Practice Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This department of the Law Firm Program will focus on the types of cases and clients encountered by a small firm practitioner. The class will involve issues such as simple wills, DUIs, setting up a corporation, simple real estate transactions, and other small firm matters. The class will also cover the practicalities of how to set up a solo firm, including such business issues as insurance, accounting, billing, hiring and firing, obtaining an office building, and other types of small or solo firm issues.
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LAW 7190 International Commercial Arbitration Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will provide the student the opportunity to engage in a simulated international commercial arbitration proceeding from its inception to the issuing of an Award. Students will act as associates in a law firm and engage in the types of activities an associate would handle when assigned to assist with an international commercial arbitration. Students will conduct research, draft memos, draft arbitration submissions and Terms of Reference, participate in a mock arbitration and analyze an arbitration award. Students also will draft an arbitration provision for a transactional agreement. The course will introduce students to international arbitration procedure and process, including controlling authority and rules of various international tribunals. Research, drafting exercises and/or oral presentations will be assigned weekly.

Open to students who have NOT taken a course in International Dispute Resolution or Law 6300 International Commercial Arbitration.
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LAW 7230 Corporate Law and Ethics Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

The course will involve a focus on the following subjects from the perspective of a Law Firm that concentrates in Business Law, and issues confronted will include: 1) the role of the business lawyer; 2) client-fraud dilemmas; 3) related party transactions; 4) corporate internal investigations; and 5) basics of business practice. Emphasis will be placed on the roles and responsibilities of business lawyers in representing entities with boards of directors with specific attention to the impact of the Sarbanes-Oxley legislation, and the ABA Model Rule of Professional Conduct 1.13.

Business Organizations is a prerequisite for this Law Firm Program.
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LAW 7240 Children & the Law Child Welfare Proceedings I Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

This course will provide students the opportunity to engage in a simulated child welfare proceeding in the juvenile division of a family court. Students will assume the role of a young attorney who is appointed by the court to represent either a parent or a child in these proceedings. Students will handle a variety of issues involved in the case including issues that arise directly from the litigation such as evidentiary matters, burden of proof and conflicts of interest questions. They will be expected to file appropriate motions and memoranda with the court and participate in oral arguments and direct and cross examination of witnesses. Students will also advocate for their client in select collateral administrative proceedings such as special education hearings, Foster Care Review Board hearings and matters involving disability income and mental health concerns.
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LAW 7250 Advising Entrepreneurs in New Business Startups Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

The purpose of the course is to expose the students to the wide variety of issues that arise when an entrepreneur forms a business entity to develop, manufacture and sell a new product. We will work on issues from pre-formation through early stage financing to the initial creation of a private placement strategy.
The course will provide the students the opportunity to engage in a series of simulated transactions involved in the founding and initial financing of a startup company engaged in the development of a green energy technology. The students will counsel the inventor and an initial financing/consulting partner in establishing the business, including choice of business organization and formation of the entity, initial licensing and protection of the intellectual property assets of the business, and the potential need for joint representation and conflict waivers. The course will also address the importance of compliance through ongoing disciplined governance of the entity, conflicts of interest and fiduciary duties inside the company, risk management including insurance matters, and maintaining flexibility to allow for multiple possible investor exit strategies.
Open to students who have completed Law 2010 Business Organizations.

Prerequisites:
LAW 7230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 7360 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 7259 Pre-Trial Litigation Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 3

This course will utilize a realistic hypothetical case study featuring allegations of sexual harassment in employment to introduce students to the pretrial litigation process in federal court from new client intake through preparation of the Final Pretrial Order. Students will be divided into two opposing law firms, one representing the plaintiff, the other the defendant employer and the accused harasser. Students will research applicable law, conduct initial client and witness interviews, analyze the strengths and weaknesses of the litigation, and draft appropriate pleadings. Students will become familiar with the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and learn how to take advantage of them. Assignments include preparing for, taking and defending depositions; researching, drafting and arguing motions in limine before a sitting federal judge; and preparing strategically for and engaging in settlement negotiations. This course is designed for students who are considering careers in civil litigation.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2220 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 7310 Franchising Law Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2 OR 3

A wide range of retail, wholesale and service businesses operate under franchise agreements, everything from gas stations, to pizza and sandwich shops, to new car dealerships, which are regulated by a variety of state and federal laws. This course will introduce students to the business concepts underlying franchising relationships and the laws affecting franchising, including statutes governing the formation and termination of franchise relationships, disclosure and registration requirements, and trademark and antitrust laws. Students will draft and review franchise agreements and disclosure documents, counsel a prospective franchisee and a start-up franchisor, and consider issues that can result in litigation between franchisors and franchisees. Students will do a series of research and drafting exercises such as a law firm associate would handle.
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LAW 7350 Pre-trial Criminal Advocacy Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 3

Pretrial Criminal Advocacy will focus on developing students understanding of criminal advocacy from the initiation of charges through motions in limine dealing with evidentiary issues. An understanding of advocacy in our criminal justice system will be taught through three case files. Students will be required to act as prosecutors for one case file, defense attorneys as another case file, and then as judges in the last file. These case files, as well as substantive instructions on the various stages of the litigation, are contained in the book Criminal Pretrial Advocacy (West, forthcoming June 2012).
There will be NO excused absences for this class, as every class involves a court hearing.
Pass/No Pass Option not permitted.
Prerequisite: Law 2100 Criminal Procedure
Recommended: Law 1140 Criminal Law and Law 2220 Evidence

Prerequisites:
LAW 2100 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 7360 Anatomy of a Business Transaction I Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 3

This course examines the many business, structural, corporate, and governance issues involved in mergers, acquisitions, dispositions and other business transactions. These issues are addressed in written client advice, drafting assignments and in-class presentations that will provide the principal basis for grade evaluation.
The vehicle for examining these issues is a hypothetical transaction involving the sale of a significant line of business by a public corporation, either to a third party or possibly to the corporation's controlling shareholder.
There is no textbook for the course. Instead, course materials will consist of articles and practice notes, relevant forms and documents used in comparable transactions, and client memos and advice. Course materials will be posted on (or linked through) TWEN. In addition, students will have access to and use of the practice materials collected and posted on the Practical Law Company website. There will not be a final examination. Completion of Business Organizations is a prerequisite for taking the course.

LAW 2010 or 2160 Business Organizations is a prerequisite.

Prerequisites:
LAW 2010 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) OR
LAW 2160 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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LAW 7370 Small Firm Practice in Canada Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 3

This course is designed to prepare students for the practice of law in a Canadian small firm. Class assignments will explore the economic and administrative aspects of setting up and managing a Canadian law practice. Students will also work through substantive legal problems that simulate matters they are likely to encounter in a small practice, including litigation, real estate, wills and estates, and business organization matters.

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LAW 7380 Juvenile Justice Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 3

The Juvenile Justice Law Firm Practice Course will focus on the representation of juveniles charged with delinquent offenses. The class will focus of the various aspects of juvenile criminal representation including but not limited to motion practice, competency proceedings, client representation, detention, adjudication, dispositional and post-dispositional hearings and juvenile extension and waiver. A court observation paper will be a required component of the class. The class will be taught through readings, case law and law reviews as well as video, a panel of practicing attorneys and class at a local juvenile detention facility. Active participation requires legal writing assignments, oral arguments, mock trial and appellate issue spotting/brief writing. The class is taught by a 30 plus year juvenile court attorney practitioner and a current sitting juvenile court jurist.

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LAW 7390 International Business Transactions Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 3

This course is designed to provide students with an understanding of some of the more important legal considerations arising in international business transactions. We will explore a basic export sales arrangement, moving on to examine the use of foreign sales agents to help improve sales in the local market, and conclude with an in-depth analysis of a common distributor arrangement in the foreign country. We will examine the terms of a popular model distribution agreement used to establish a distributor relationship in China, and through that agreement we will consider common legal problems involving competition law, intellectual property rights, foreign anti-corrupt practices rules, foreign investment rules, international monetary policy, and some of the business problems that arise in such arrangements. We will also look at governance problems that can arise in 50-50 joint ventures, using the recently terminated TNK-BP joint venture in Russia as our model for discussion.

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LAW 7400 Business Planning Law Firm ProgramCredit Hours: 2

The course examines the many business, structural, and legal issues involved in the formation, operation, and disposition of a business enterprise. There will be particular emphasis on capital raising activities common to most businesses as they progress from formation to sale or dissolution. These issues will be addressed in written client advice, drafting assignments and in-class presentations.

The vehicle for examining these issues will be a series of hypothetical transactions engaged in by most businesses in order to expose students to the types of transactions they can expect to see in advising businesses.

There is no textbook for the course. Instead, course materials will consist of articles and practice notes, relevant forms and documents used in comparable transactions, and client memos and advice. Course materials will be posted on (or linked through) TWEN. In addition, students will have access to and use of the practice materials collected and posted on the Practical Law Company website. There will not be a final examination.

Prerequisite: Law 2010 Business Organizations

Prerequisites:
LAW 7230 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently) AND
LAW 7360 (Minimum Grade of 1.0, May not be taken concurrently)

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For more information about UDM, or to apply online, go to www.udmercy.edu/apply.


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