Faculty

A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z

Steven C. Abell

Associate Professor of Psychology and director of the Clinical Psychology master’s program, teaches general psychology, abnormal psychology, intellectual assessment, and psychotherapy. His areas of special interest include child and adolescent treatment and contemporary psychodynamic theory. His most recent research publications have been studies of intellectual assessment and the correlates of body image. Abell holds a B.A. degree from Columbia University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Loyola University Chicago. He joined the University in 1994.

Gloria H. Albrecht

Associate Professor of Religion and Ethics, teaches business and economic ethics, feminist ethics and theology, and women’s studies. Albrecht’s publications and presentations deal with issues of community, economic justice, women’s issues, and epistemology in ethics. She is doing research on economic paradigms as challenged by women’s work. She has served as the director of the Women’s Studies program. Albrecht holds a B.A. degree from the University of Maryland, a M.L.A. degree from Johns Hopkins University, a S.T.M. degree from St. Mary’s Seminary (Baltimore), and a Ph.D. degree from Temple University. She joined the University in 1992.

R. Gerard Albright, S.J.

Professor of Biology, has taught a variety of courses and has served in various administrative capacities, including chair of the Premedical and Predental Committee. He spent a semester as visiting professor of Biology and an academic consultant at the University of San Francisco. His professional specialties include comparative vertebrate anatomy and histology, as well as other aspects of animal structure and function. Albright holds bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees from Loyola University of Chicago. He joined the University in 1960.

Nizar Al-Holou

Professor and Chair of Electrical and Computer Engineering, teaches courses in the areas of digital logic, computer networks, microprocessors, computer architecture and electrical circuits. His area of expertise is in digital systems, microprocessors, real-time systems, computer-based instruction, and computer architecture. He is a senior IEEE member. He holds a Bachelor of Engineering degree from Damascus University, a master of science from Ohio State University, Columbus, OH, and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Dayton, all in Electrical Engineering. He joined the University in 1992.

Beth J. Anctil

Assistant Professor of Nursing, Health Systems Management, teaches the capstone courses for health systems management, leadership, and quality, planning and management. Anctil earned her M.S. in Nursing Administration through the University of Colorado Health Sciences Center in Denver, and her B.S. in Nursing from the University of Michigan. She has worked in a variety of administrative roles both staff and operations, primarily in large medical group practices. Prior to coming to the University, Anctil served as executive director for the Group Practice Improvement Network, a national membership organization committed to improving health care using the principles and techniques of continuous quality improvement. She joined the University in 2001.

Armand R. Ash-Rafzadeh

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, teaches DSP, computer applications and instrumentation, digital control, circuits and systems. Ash’s publications and presentations deal with bio-medical engineering and electrical engineering issues, including Doppler Ultrasound Blood Flow Analysis, ultrasound imaging, and non-linear filtering. He consults with the automotive industry on CAE applications in mechatronics, and has been involved in developing the methodology and processes for Total Vehicle EDS-CAE Modeling, CAE System Element Identification, CAE Standard and Library Committees, and CAE Analysis Methods. Ash holds a B.S. from the College of Science and Technology, M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Oklahoma. He joined the University in 1987.

Roy Aston

Professor of Biomedical Sciences, teaches pharmacology courses in dentistry, nursing anesthesia and physician assistant programs. His major interest is in central nervous system pharmacology. He has been a contributor through four editions of the dental textbook Pharmacology and Therapeutics for Dentistry, edited by J. Tagiela. He holds a B.Sc. degree from Assumption University of Windsor, Ontario, and a M.Sc. degree in pharmacology from Wayne State University. He also holds a Ph.D. degree in pharmacology from the University of Toronto, and spent one year as a post-doctoral fellow in pharmacology at the University of Michigan College of Medicine. He joined the University in 1970.

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Janet M. Baiardi

Interim Assistant Dean and Chair of the BSN Completion and Graduate Program, McAuley School of Nursing, teaches nursing theory, research, health assessment and FNP theory and clinical courses. Her areas of research include self-care, aging, caregiver burden and management of dementia. She earned her B.S.N. from Mercy College of Detroit and her M.S.N. and Ph.D. in nursing from Wayne State University. In addition, she holds a postmaster’s certificate in gerontology from WSU and completed the family nurse practitioner certificate at Boston College. She joined the University in 1994.

Stokes S. Baker

Associate Professor of Biology, teaches botany, ecology, environmental science, evolution and molecular genetics. His interdisciplinary research is investigating some of the environmental risks in using genetically engineered crops. Research on plant development is also being pursued. He has published articles in scientific journals on gene regulation, gene expression, and plant development. Baker’s degrees include a B.S. from Davis and Elkins College, a M.S. from SUNY’s College of Environmental Science and Forestry, and a Ph.D. from Ohio State University. After postdoctoral research at Michigan State University, he joined the faculty in 1993.

Michael G. Barry

Associate Professor of English, teaches American literature, modernism and naturalism, and writing. He has additional research interests in the relationship of ideology and aesthetics, and in the literary components of liberation struggles. His interest in public intellectual discussion prompted him to organize a Liberal Arts faculty/student symposium on urban migration. He has published articles on Robert Penn Warren, John Steinbeck, and James Welch. In the past, he has taught at universities in Turkey and the People’s Republic of China. He holds a B.A. degree from Loyola University, Chicago and a Ph.D. degree from SUNY Buffalo. He joined the University in 1994.

Arthur J. Beer

Professor of Theatre, teaches play directing, history of theatre, acting styles, voice and diction, introduction to theatre, and fine arts. He has acted in and directed more than 150 plays, including several world premieres. A member of Actor’s Equity, SAG and AFTRA, Beer has received Best Actor and Best Director awards from all of Detroit’s major periodicals, and has won the Hopwood and Gesu awards in playwriting. He holds a B.A. degree from DePauw University, a M.A. degree from the University of Michigan, and a Ph.D. degree from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1975.

Mark A. Benvenuto

Associate Professor and Chair of Chemistry and Biochemistry, teaches general and inorganic chemistry. He is actively writing pedagogical materials for general-level chemistry courses. He is currently performing research in the area of ring-opening polymerizations of carboranes and metallacarboranes, and analysis of ancient and medieval artifacts. He is a recipient of UDM Science Teacher of the Year Award and has been nominated for this award for the past three years. Benvenuto holds a B.S. from the Virginia Military Institute and a Ph.D. from the University of Virginia, where he was awarded a graduate student duPont Fellowship. He performed post-doctoral research at the Pennsylvania State University and joined the University in 1993.

Michael D. Bernacchi

Professor of Marketing, teaches marketing management, consumer behavior, marketing communications, research and corporate social responsibility. He has a B.A. and M.A. from Drake University (Des Moines, IA), a Ph.D from Southern Illinois University and J.D. from the University of Detroit. Bernacchi is a frequent contributor and consultant to business, not-for-profits and the media. He publishes a weekly marketing newsletter, Under the Mike-Roscope. He joined the University in 1973.

Libby B. Blume

Associate Professor of Psychology, teaches child development, environmental psychology, women’s studies, and family relationships. Blume is active in the leadership of the National Council on Family Relations and serves as editor of the Michigan Family Review. A recipient of the HEW Award of Excellence, Blume’s research focuses on early intervention, social role perception, and parenting. In the past, Blume received a UDM research leave to study adolescent ballet dancers in the midwest. Blume holds a B.A. degree from the University of California at Davis, a M.A. degree from San Francisco State University, and a Ph.D. degree from Texas Tech University. She joined the University in 1987.

Jeffery J. Boats

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, teaches in pure and applied mathematics. His research involves the use of cooperative learning and active learning in the teaching of undergraduate mathematics. Prior to joining the University of Detroit Mercy, he taught at the University of Texas at El Paso. He holds bachelor of science degrees in both mathematics and physics from St. Bonaventure University, a Master of Applied Mathematics from Carnegie Mellon and a Doctor of Arts from Carnegie Mellon. Boats joined the University in 1998.

Jacques G. Boettcher

Associate Professor of Management and Finance, teaches law and real estate finance. His area of interest is foreign trade law, and his area of research is in the comparative law of the Pacific Rim countries, especially China and Japan. His professional presentations deal with the legal and financial perils for American companies investing in the emerging third world areas and in forming partnerships and joint ventures with emerging countries. A practicing attorney, he is a member of the State Bar of Michigan. Boettcher earned his Ph.B., M.A. and J.D. degrees from the University of Detroit. He joined the University in 1954.

Barbara J. Bolz

Assistant Professor and Chair of Communication Studies, teaches public speaking, public opinion, mass media, political campaign and organizational communication. Her publications and presentations deal with issues of diversity in higher education and crisis communication, including its relevance to the transformation of technologies to Third World countries. She is currently doing research in organizing for diversity through curriculum transformation. Bolz is the recipient of the Elizabeth Youngjohn Teaching Award from Wayne State University. She holds a B.A. degree from Oakland University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1989.

Larry J. Bossman

Associate Professor of Management, teaches management/motivation, organizational leadership, and management development. Prior to joining the University, Bossman was on the Corporate Personnel staff of General Motors Corporation. At UDM, Bossman has served as department chair of business administration, associate dean of Graduate Business Programs and director of the Business Institute. He is currently a consultant/evaluator with North Central Association’s Commission on Institutions of Higher Education. His research focuses on educational outcomes assessment. He earned his bachelor’s degree at Marquette University, and M.S. and Ph.D. at University of Wisconsin. Bossman joined the University in 1971.

David J.R. Brook

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, teaches organic chemistry. His research focuses on the synthesis of new molecular materials with unique electrical and magnetic properties. Current projects include synthesis of coordination polymers containing stable free radical ligands, and stable free radicals capable of forming self assembled arrays. Brook received his B.Sc. from the University of Lancaster in England and his Ph.D. from the University of Colorado at Boulder. He has completed post-doctoral positions at the University of Texas at Austin. He joined the University in 1997.

Bruce M. Brorby

Associate Dean, College of Business Administration and Assistant Professor of Economics, teaches principles of economics, intermediate economics and economic theory. He holds B.S. and M.A. degrees from the University of Detroit. Brorby joined the University in 1971.

Donald R. Burkholder

Associate Professor of Political Science, teaches public administration, American politics, politics and the media, and government and the economy. He serves as the University’s Truman Scholarship representative and is a labor arbitrator and fact-finder primarily in disputes between local or state government and public employee labor organizations. His research interests include dispute resolution, organizational change, and structural-behavioral similarities between consolidating governmental units and institutions of higher education. Burkholder holds a B.A. degree from the University of Maryland, a M.A. degree from Kent State University and a Ph.D. degree from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1976.

Kathleen T. Bush

Associate Dean of Liberal Arts, teaches academic exploration courses and history of American women. Her expertise is working with special population students. She holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Detroit. Bush joined the University in 1982.

Donald R. Byrne

Professor of Economics, teaches economic theory and a variety of elective courses. He has co-authored, "Financial Markets in Transition," and is completing two texts: Financial Economics and A New Macroeconomic Policy for an Evolving Microeconomic Order. He is the recipient of the Bernstein and Bernstein Accounting Scholarship, the Detroit Edison Commerce Scholarship and a Ford Foundation Doctoral Fellowship in Business and Economics, and Teacher of the Year for the College of Liberal Arts. Byrne holds B.S. and M.B.A. degrees from the University of Detroit and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Notre Dame. He joined the University in 1966.

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R. Michael Canjar

Professor and Chair, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science, received a Bachelor’s of Engineering and Master of Engineering from University of Detroit. Through his Ph.D. in Mathematics from University of Michigan, he specialized in mathematical logic. He taught at several universities, including the University of Baltimore, where he served as chair of the Department of Mathematics, Computer Science and Statistics. He has published articles in mathematical journals on mathematical logic and set theory. He is also interested in computer science, particularly object oriented programming and windows programming. Canjar joined the University in 1995. Canjar’s home page is www.udmercy.edu/htmls/ personal/canjarrm/canjarrm.htm.

Elaine K. Carey

Assistant Professor of History, teaches Mexican, Latin American and women’s history. Her research interests are Mexican social movements in the twentieth century. She has additional research interests in the area of Latin American gender studies. Her recent publications focus on the 1968 Mexican student movement. Carey is the director or the Carney Latin American Solidarity Archive in the College of Liberal Arts. She holds a B.A. and M.A. from Florida State University, and received her Ph.D. from the University of New Mexico. She joined the University in 1998.

Elizabeth U. Carlson

Associate Professor of Education, teaches program planning and evaluation, curriculum design, and methods of secondary education courses. Carlson’s works on the application of technology to instruction and the creation of professional development programs were published by the National School Boards Association and in professional publications. She served as evaluator of technology programs and received the Consultants That Work Award from the International Society for Technology in Education. She received a B.A., M.A., and Ed.D. from the University of Michigan and was awarded the Dean’s Merit Fellowship. Carlson joined the University in 1994.

Kelly Carter

Assistant Librarian, Public Services, Outer Drive Campus Library, provides reference services and research skills instruction. Her areas of collection development are Philosophy, Theater, Civil Engineering, and Education. She also maintains the government documents collection at the Outer Drive Library. She holds a B.A. degree in Economics and an M.L.I.S. Library Science degree from Wayne State University. Kelly joined the University in 1999.

Mary Lou Caspers

Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, teaches basic and advanced biochemistry. Caspers’ publications and presentations deal with alterations in brain proteins as a function of aging and with the effects of metal ions such as aluminum on various enzymes in the blood, liver and brain; she is the author of more than 20 papers in refereed journals. Caspers is the recipient of the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence and the Engineering and Science Teacher of the Year Award, as well as a number of research grants. Caspers received a B.S. in Chemistry from the University of Detroit and a Ph.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine. She joined the University in 1977.

Gerald F. Cavanagh, S.J.

Professor of Management and Charles T. Fisher, III, Chair of Business Ethics, teaches corporate social responsibility. He authored five books, the latest, American Business Values, with International Perspectives, and numerous articles. Cavanagh has lectured on business ethics worldwide and held business ethics chairs at Boston College and Santa Clara universities. He was provost at University of Detroit Mercy. Cavanagh currently researches spirituality in business and the virtue of courage within the firm. He holds a B.S. in Engineering from Case Western, Ph.L., M.B.A., and M.Ed. degrees from St. Louis University, a S.T.L. from Loyola-Chicago and a D.B.A. in Management from Michigan State University. Cavanagh joined the University in 1980.

Yogendra S. Chadda

Professor, Mechanical Engineering, teaches design, reliability and manufacturing processes. Chadda’s publications and research are in design and automated manufacturing. He has consulted for IBM, Ford and Carboloy Inc. He is currently involved in the application of expert systems to solve manufacturing assembly line problems. He has received the UNESCO Fellowship and is a recipient of the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence. Chadda holds a B.Sc. (Eng.) from Bihar University in India, a M.Sc. (Vehicles & Machines) from the University of Wales and a Ph.D. from The City University, London. He joined the University in 1983.

Nancy K. Chesik

Associate Librarian, Public Services, McNichols Campus Library, is the government documents and business librarian. Her subject disciplines for collection development are accounting, marketing, management and finance. She provides reference service and research skills instruction. Chesik has B.F.A. and M.S.L.S. degrees from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1991.

Mark Choinski

Technical Director and Designer for the Theater Company, teaches stagecraft and rehearsal and production. He designs lighting for all productions and scenic designs for two shows per season. Along with his UDM experience, he has worked at almost every professional theater in the Detroit metro area and has built sets for local commercials and industrial films. He holds a B.A. degree from Mercy College of Detroit. Choinski joined the University in 1979.

Claire Crabtree

Professor of English, teaches American literature, creative writing, women’s studies, folklore and courses on poetry and fiction. A Faulkner specialist, she has published on Faulkner, in addition to such women writers as Erdrich, Hurston, and Toni Morrison. She is also a published poet. Crabtree was a Fulbright senior lecturer in Timisoara, Romania in 1994-95. She holds a B.A. degree from Trinity College, a M.A. degree from Fordham, and a Ph.D. degree from Wayne State University. Crabtree joined the University in 1987.

Trevor N.F. Crick

Associate Professor of Finance, teaches graduate and undergraduate finance, including financial management, financial policy (case approach), capital budgeting and investments. His research interests include small business financing and international strategies, on which he has presented papers at national and regional meetings. Crick holds a B.S.M.E. from University of Aston (U.K.), M.B.A. from Northern Illinois University and Ph.D. from University of Iowa. He joined the University in 1981.

Roland F. Cronkhite, Jr.

Professor of Philosophy, teaches introductory philosophy and ethics, the history of philosophy, logic, metaphysics, epistemology, and applied ethics on both the undergraduate and graduate levels. His areas of special interest and expertise include medical ethics, professional ethical issues for psychologists, existentialism, and phenomenology. Cronkhite holds a B.A. degree from Providence College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from The Catholic University of America. He joined the University in 1974.

Hugh Culik

Associate Professor of English and Director of Writing Across the Curriculum, creates opportunities for students to publish fiction, poetry, scholarship and photography. He urges collaborative work on hypertext, websites, and postmodern fiction. Culik reveres Beckett, Burroughs, Acker, and students who work hard, and he encourages his students to continue their work through graduate studies. He earned his B.A. in English at Michigan State University and M.A. from the University of Michigan. His written work includes a novel by Berkley Books, in addition to various short fiction, scholarship in Modern Fiction Studies, Mosaic, Eire-Ireland, PLL, and elsewhere, some of which has been anthologized. He joined the University in 1989.

Gerald Curtsinger

Associate Professor of Communication Studies, teaches audio/video production, broadcast performance, film, media law/programming, and visual communication. Curtsinger’s professional presentations have dealt with contract employment in television sports production. He has served as the audio mixer for numerous local/network telecasts of college and professional sporting events. He is currently completing a documentary film about a local election campaign. His research interests are communication technology, documentary film, and labor related issues in media. Curtsinger holds a B.S. degree from Central Michigan University and a M.A. degree from Wayne State University and is currently working on his Ph.D. He joined the University in 1994.

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Kevin Daimi

Associate Professor of Computer Science, teaches artificial intelligence, Internet programming with Java, computer science I & II, data structures, compiler design, and UNIX. He worked in the computer industry for several years. Daimi has published papers in the areas of expert systems, natural language processing, and intelligent tutoring systems. He also authored two books. He received his Bachelor of Science in Mathematics from the University of Baghdad, a Master of Science in Applied Mathematics, and a Ph.D. in Computational Optimal Control from Cranfield Institute of Technology, England. Daimi joined the University in 1998.

Shuvra Das

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, teaches mechanics of materials, mechanical design, computer aided design, and finite element methods. His research interests and publications are in mechanistic modeling of manufacturing processes, solution of inverse problems, laser assisted manufacturing, and the thermo-mechanics of manufacturing. He received the Engineering Teacher of the Year Award in 1996. Das earned his B.Tech from Indian Institute of Technology, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Iowa State University. He was a post-doctoral research associate at University of Notre Dame and worked as an analysis engineer for Concurrent Technologies Corporation prior to joining the University in 1993.

Charles A. Dause

Associate Professor of Communication Studies. Dause’s academic background is in communication studies with a specialty in argumentation and debate. He is co-author of Argumentation: Inquiry and Advocacy, a college argumentation text. Dause developed and implemented the Academic Exploration Program at the University. He has done numerous programs on undergraduate advising issues for the National Academic Advising Association. Dause holds a B.A. degree from Muskingum College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1964.

Jeanne M. David

Associate Professor of Accounting, teaches introductory and upper level financial and managerial accounting. She has published in the Journal of Business Ethics and Research in Accounting Ethics and made presentations for the American Accounting Association, ORSA/TIMS, and the Institute of Management Accountants. She is a Michigan Council director and Oakland County Chapter past president of the Institute of Management Accountants and a member of the American Accounting Association and Beta Alpha Psi. David received her CPA from Texas, her Ph.D. and M.B.A. from Texas A & M University and her B.S. from the University of Lowell. She joined the University in 1988.

Amy Green Deines

Assistant Professor of Architecture, teaches architectural design and visual communication. Her work is firmly grounded in the idea of collaboration and its yielding effect in creating places that directly involve the inherent qualities of the body as a means for both structure and memory. Deines is a practicing designer that engages a multi-disciplinary approach to each project offering a variety of experiences in practice and teaching. Her work has been published in international and domestic design journals. Deines received her B.F.A. from Wayne State University and her M.Arch from Cranbrook Academy of Art. She joined the University in 2000.

Edwin B. DeWindt

Professor of History, teaches the history of England and the Middle Ages. He is the author and editor of several books on society and law in the English Middle Ages, among them, Royal Justice and the Medieval English Countryside. A recipient of a Guggenheim fellowship, DeWindt is a Fellow of the Royal Historical Society. He holds a Ph.B. degree from the University of Detroit, the Licentiate of Medieval Studies [LMS] from the Pontifical Institute of Medieval Studies, and a Ph.D. degree from the Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies, University of Toronto. He joined the University in 1968.

Vivian I. Dicks

Professor of Communication Studies, teaches argumentation, audience analysis, group dynamics, persuasion, and public speaking. Dicks’ research and publications deal with legal rhetoric. She holds a B.A. degree from Wayne State University, M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Ohio State University, and a J.D. degree from the Detroit College of Law. Dicks joined the University in 1979.

Michael P. Dosch

Clinical Instructor and Co-Chair of Nurse Anesthesiology, directs the program of nurse anesthesia affiliated with St. Joseph Mercy Oakland. He teaches applied physics, professional aspects, and the anesthesia gas machine. Dosch has published on the subjects of recall under anesthesia, statistics, anesthesia equipment, and clinical pharmacology. His research interests include prevention of side effects related to anesthetic agents, universal precautions, and anesthesia equipment. Dosch holds a B.A. from University of Michigan and a M.S. from Mercy College of Detroit. He joined the University in 1988.

Antonio Drommi

Instructional Technology Coordinator and Instructor of Computer Information Systems, teaches advanced programming, interface design, database design and structured development for the internet. He is the instructional technologist for the College of Business Administration and coordinates the Quality Program in ISO/QS 9000 for the UDM academic, Detroit manufacturing and business communities. Drommi holds a B.A. in Business Administration from Wayne State University, M.B.A. and M.S. degrees in Computer Information Systems from University of Detroit Mercy and is pursuing his doctorate at Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1996.

Utpal Dutta

Professor and Chair, Civil & Environmental Engineering, teaches transportation engineering, constructional materials, engineering economics and optimization. Dutta’s publications and professional presentations both here and abroad have dealt with transportation planning, use of waste materials in highway construction and transportation safety and control. He is currently doing research on the use of automotive shredder residue in asphalt pavement. In 1994, he was awarded the UDM President’s Award for Faculty Excellence. Dutta has a Ph.D. from the University of Oklahoma and is a licensed professional engineer in Michigan. He joined the University in 1988.

John M. Dwyer

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, teaches mathematics, statistics, and computer science. Dwyer’s publications have included numerical evaluations of mathematical functions and social issues of (computer) technology. He has given numerous talks on mathematics, statistics, and computer science topics. His current interests include the generalized calculus and nonrational processes (such as for artificial intelligence). He has served as chair (1974-77) and interim chair (1990-91) of the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science. He received his A.B. and M.S. from the University of Michigan-Ann Arbor and his Ph.D. from Texas A & M University. He joined the University in 1969.

Nancy Dwyer

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, teaches calculus, linear algebra, number theory, and mathematics for elementary teachers. Her teaching background includes 12 years of teaching on both the elementary and secondary levels and the teaching of college level mathematics in Ohio and Georgia. She is a Project NeExT Fellow and has research interests that include finding ways to incorporate problem solving involving real world applications into the mathematics curriculum. She has a Master’s in Guidance and Counseling and a Master’s in Mathematics from Wayne State University and a Ph.D. in Mathematics Education from the University of Toledo. She joined the University in 1997.

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Roy E. Finkenbine

Associate Professor and Chair of History, teaches African American and American social history. He is a specialist on the 19th-century African American experience. He is currently engaged in a study of the role and influence of black churches in the antislavery movement. As associate editor of the Black Abolitionist Papers Project at Florida State University, he co-edited the five-volume Black Abolitionist Papers, 1830-1865 and Witness for Freedom: African American Voices on Race, Slavery, and Emancipation. He recently completed Sources of the African American Past. He is director of the Black Abolitionist Archives in the College of Liberal Arts. Finkenbine holds a Ph.D. degree from Bowling Green State University. He joined the University in 1996.

Yolanda Fleischer

Associate Professor of Theatre, teaches voice production, characterization and scene study. Her UDM directing has included On the Open Road and Two. Fleischer’s professional work in area theatres has most recently included If We Are Women. Fleischer’s other work includes: serving as past artistic director of JCC’s "Readers Theatre," directing Growing Up Female, a community-wide project with the city of Flint; founding the Detroit Women’s Shakespeare Company; and serving on the advisory board of a PBS project. She holds a B.S. of Ed. degree from Central Michigan University and M.A. and M.F.A. degrees from Wayne State University. Fleischer joined the University in 1986.

James M. Fragomeni

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, teaches classes in engineering mechanics, material science, and manufacturing processes. Research interests include materials design and development of advanced aluminum alloys for the Airforce and aerospace applications; research involving titanium alloys for biomedical and aerospace applications; research involving welding for space applications. Previous research included experience with NASA and the Airforce. He earned a B.S. in Metallurgical Engineering from the University of Pittsburgh, and a M.S. and Ph.D. from Purdue University School of Mechanical Engineering. He joined the University in 2000.

John T. Franklin

Professor of Counseling and Addiction Studies, teaches drug effects, group methods, family systems, and qualitative research. Franklin’s publications and presentations deal with chemical dependence among women, group therapy with dual-diagnosed patients, and empowering families for drug abuse prevention. He is the recipient of the AAA Michigan Professor of Addiction Studies, the Ruben A. Lacy Distinguished Service Award, and the student organization advisor of the year. He holds a B.A. from St. Mary of the Lake Seminary, a S.T.L. from the Gregorian University, a M.A. from the University of Illinois, and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Franklin joined the University in 1978.

John Freeman

Professor of English, teaches Renaissance literature, critical theory and Shakespeare. Freeman’s publications and professional presentations both here and abroad have dealt with Thomas More’s Utopia, Shakespeare’s Hamlet, and Stoppard’s Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are Dead. He has published articles in ELH, Moreana, and Modern Language Review. He is currently doing research on holographic potential in the Arnolfini Portrait, and the application of complexity theory to Sterne’s Tristram Shandy. Freeman holds a B.A. degree from Michigan State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1987.

Wladyslaw Fuchs

Associate Professor of Architecture, teaches architectural design, visual communications and Computer Aided Design. His main interests include integrating these subjects across the curriculum of architectural education. Fuchs recently published an article entitled Progressive Tradition, focusing on the relevance of the drawing experience in CAD practice. A member of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture, his research includes the design and implementation of the V.C.net, an Internet based educational tool for the architectural community. He earned M.Arch. and Ph.D. degrees from the Warsaw Technical University in Poland. Fuchs returned to the University to teach in 1990.

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Josephine M. Gambini

Professor of Special Education, teaches courses in emotionally impaired, learning disabilities, inclusionary education, and educational psychology. Gambini’s interests include integrating the arts in the curriculum, collaboration in education and global studies. She presented nationally on the collaborative process and currently researches collaboration models and their use in education and mental health related services, and global educational experiences. Gambini received the College of Education and Human Services President’s Award for Faculty Excellence in 1996. She holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from San Francisco State University and a Ph.D. from Wayne State University. Gambini joined the University in 1974.

Chitta R. Gangopadhyay

Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, teaches geotechnical engineering on soil mechanics, foundation engineering, earth dams, tunneling, earth and waterfront structures and others. His publications here and abroad have dealt with case histories of geotechnical failures, constitutive relationships of cohesive soils and laboratory modeling of in situ tests. His publications here are in ASCE, ASTM and national and international conferences. His current interest is in the area of ground water modeling and failures of bulkheads. He received his M.S. and Ph.D. at the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. He is a registered professional engineer and joined the University in 1985.

Gary W. Garrett

Associate Professor of Communication Studies, teaches advertising, advertising campaigns, public relations, public relations writing, public relations programs, and mass communication ethics. He has written and edited regional trade journals, annual reports, newsletters, magazines, brochures, health and safety guides for numerous not-for-profit organizations, and is a published poet. He is currently doing research in the areas of niche audience advertising and the use of the Internet as a new advertising medium and is the director of the Honors Program. Garrett holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1991.

Gary A. Giamartino

Dean, College of Business Administration, Professor of Management, has scholarship and research interests in international entrepreneurship and in the relationship between entrepreneurship and economic development. He has authored articles published in the journals Entrepreneurship Theory and Practice, Economic Development Review, Small Business Forum and others. His teaching expertise is in international management and organizational behavior. He serves as vice president for development and is on the board of directors of the United States Association for Small Business and Entrepreneurship. Giamartino is on the boards of directors of Junior Achievement of Southeastern Michigan and Michigan Partners of the Americas. He completed the Leadership Detroit program of the Detroit Regional Chamber of Commerce in 1998-99. Giamartino received a Ph.D. from Vanderbilt University, M.A. from Western Kentucky University and A.B. from the State University of New York at Fredonia. He joined the University in 1997.

Nancy L. Gibney

Assistant Professor of Education, teaches reading and language arts methods at the elementary and secondary levels. Gibney’s publications and professional presentations deal with urban university and school partnerships. She presented at the 1996 Association and Curriculum Development’s National Conference regarding reconstructing teaching and learning practices through an urban school and university partnership. Gibney holds a B.A. from Western Michigan University, M.A. from Eastern Michigan University, and Ph.D. from Walden University. She joined the University in 1988.

Cindy A. Gillham

Associate Librarian, Public Services, McNichols Campus Library, is responsible for the collections in biology, chemistry, chemical engineering, physics, and history, as well as the provision of reference services and research skills instruction. She is the Special Collections Librarian. She holds a B.A. degree from Oakland University, and a M.I.L.S. from the University of Michigan. She joined the University in 1988.

Christopher Gilliard

Assistant Professor of English, teaches African-American literature and information theory. Gilliard earned his B.A. in English from the University of Detroit and his M.A. in English from Purdue University (he is currently working on his doctorate). At Purdue, he was awarded a Graduate Opportunities Fellowship to support his studies, which focus on rhetoric and composition and cultural studies. He served on Purdue’s College of Liberal Arts’ Affirmative Action Committee and the Advisory Committee to the dean of Liberal Arts concerning issues of diversity. Gilliard joined the University in 1998.

Norman S. Goldner

Associate Professor of Sociology, teaches in the areas of psychology and sociology, and he is a state licensed marital and family therapist. His special interests include marriage and family, delinquency, theory, social problems, and urban sociology. Goldner has written technical sociological articles and co-authored a book on gender relations. He is a trained family and divorce mediator and has directed a study of Detroit for the Drug Enforcement Agency. Goldner was awarded a M.A. degree from the University of Detroit’s Marital and Family Therapy Program. He holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from the University of Minnesota and a Ph.D. degree from Ohio State University. He joined the University in 1972.

Gregory M. Grabowski

Associate Professor of Biology, teaches physiology, pathophysiology and human anatomy. Grabowski came to the University after completion of his post-doctoral training at Harvard’s School of Public Health, where he began his research on pulmonary inflammation induced by metal containing particles in industrial settings. He was awarded National Institute of Health and Center for Indoor Air fellowships to fund his postdoctoral training, as well as Slocum-Lunz fellowships to fund his graduate studies. Grabowski holds a B.A. from Canisius College, M.S. from the University of Charleston, and Ph.D. from the Medical University of South Carolina. He joined the University in 1996.

James F. Graves

Associate Professor of Biology, teaches general microbiology, immunology and pathogenic microbiology. Graves’ publications and presentations have dealt with microbiology, public health, and the environment. His laboratory work focuses on bioremediation and degradation research, which has been supported by grants from the Federal Government and private industry. He is an elected member of the American Society for Microbiology. He was a research scientist at Indiana University, research associate at the University of Virginia, and a postdoctoral fellow at the University of North Carolina. Graves holds B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Missouri. He joined the University in 1987.

Bernard A. Green

Professor of Psychology, teaches advanced psychopathology, theories of personality, theories of psychotherapy, abnormal psychology, psychotherapeutic technique, and the interpretive processes as applied to film. He has published a study of Oscar Wilde as well as short fiction and poetry. He is a clinical psychologist and psychoanalyst, certified by the American Board of Professional Psychology in Clinical Psychology and by Division 39 (Psychoanalysis) of the American Psychology Association. He holds a B.A. from the City College of the City of New York and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. He joined the University in 1973.

Harold Greene

Assistant Professor of Psychology, teaches perception/cognitive psychology, experimental psychology and learning and memory. His research interests aim at determining functional organizations in the human visual system, including the visual system’s representation of contours and the representation of mechanisms involved in the search for a target object among irrelevant clutter. He obtained a B.A. with honors from Queen’s University, Canada, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees in Cognitive/ Experimental Psychology from the University of Georgia. Before coming to UDM, Greene held research fellowships at the Center of Excellence for Research on Training in Atlanta and at the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. Greene joined the University in 1999.

Carla J. Groh

Associate Professor, Physician Assistant Program, has taught courses in research and the politics of health care and teaches within all the programs in the College of Health Professions. Groh’s clinical interest is in the area of geripsychiatry and women’s health. Prior to coming to UDM, she was the director of Psychiatric Services for a community hospital in Detroit. Dr. Groh has been involved in multiple research studies and has several publications. She earned her B.S.N. and M.S.N. from Wayne State University in Adult Psychiatric/ Mental Health Nursing and a Ph.D. in Nursing from the University of Michigan. She joined the University in 1996.

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Sarah A. Halter

Assistant Professor of Nursing, teaches women’s health, obstetrics and gynecology. She has been a certified nurse-midwife since 1987, by the American College of Nurse-Midwives. Halter was in full-scope midwifery practice from 1987 through 1996 in Metro Detroit. She maintains a women’s health practice at the Student Health Center and at a clinic for the uninsured. She has recently completed a post-master’s certificate program through SUNY Stonybrook for Family Nurse Practitioner. She possesses a B.A. degree in Art from Ursuline College, and a B.S.N. from Kent State University. Her M.S. degree with emphasis in nurse-midwifery was earned at the University of Utah. She joined the University in 1996.

Thomas Hamade

Associate Professor of Chemical Engineering, teaches plant design and is a licensed environmental engineer. He has conducted research in the design of air filters under the influence of electrostatics. He holds patents on air filtration processes and electret polymers. To reduce pollution from paint manufacturing processes, he developed a model of the volatile organic compound emissions from paint manufacturing processes. Hamade received an A.B. in Chemistry from the University of Detroit and a M.S. in Chemistry and a Ph.D. in Chemical Engineering from Wayne State University. Hamade joined the University in 1986.

Arthur C. Haman

Associate Dean of Engineering and Science and Professor of Mechanical Engineering, teaches prototype design, professional world of work, and internal combustion engines. After graduation with a Bachelor of Mechanical Engineering from the University of Detroit, Haman accepted a position as a structural engineer at Northrup Aircraft, Los Angeles. After a year, he returned to the University. While moving through the academic ranks, he completed a M.S. in Mechanical Engineering and a M.B.A. at the University of Detroit. Off-term industrial employment periods were spent at the U.S. Army Tank Automotive Command and Ford Motor Company. Haman joined the University in 1956.

Leo E. Hanifin

Dean, College of Engineering and Science and Chrysler Professor of Engineering, has focused his teaching and research in the area of manufacturing efficiencies, processes, and modeling. Hanifin has also held engineering and management positions in the automotive, aerospace and computer industries. He has received the LEAD and Outstanding Young Engineer Awards from SME and the Engineering Alumnus of the Year award from UDM. He holds B.M.E., M.E., and D.E. degrees from the University of Detroit. He joined the University as dean in 1991.

Mary Elizabeth Hannah

Professor of Psychology and director of the School Psychology Specialist program, teaches consultation, social processes, and psychological testing. Her research deals with attitudes towards persons with disabilities and with sibling relationships. She has co-authored a scale on helping within families. Hannah served as secretary and delegate of the National Association of School Psychologists. A recipient of the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence, Hannah also received a NASP Presidential Award for service to school psychology. She holds a B.A. from Sweet Briar College, a M.A. from Alfred University, and a Ph.D. from Peabody College of Vanderbilt University. She joined the University in 1977.

Walid Harb

Medical Director, Physician Assistant Program. Harb also oversees Physician Assistants system-wide for Oakwood Health Care Systems. He received his M.D. from Wayne State University School of Medicine in 1986 and did his residency in Internal Medicine. He is an assistant professor of medicine at Wayne State University. Harb teaches and precepts PA students and sits on the PA program committees. He has been the medical director for the program since 1991. In addition he maintains an outpatient internal medicine practice and completed a M.B.A. in 1998. Harb joined the University in 1990.

Mary Ann Hazen

Associate Professor, Management, teaches management development in the MBA program. She has published journal articles about organizational change and dialogue and has presented at international and national conferences. She is on the Editorial Board of The Journal of Organizational Change Management. In 1996, she received the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence in the College of Business Administration. Hazen holds the A.B. from Ursuline College for Women, the M.S.W. from the University of Michigan, and the Ph.D. in Organizational Behavior from Case Western Reserve University’s Weatherhead School of Management. She joined the University in 1989.

Kenneth L. Henold

Associate Dean of the College of Engineering and Science and Professor of Chemistry, teaches introductory chemistry for science and engineering students as well as non-science students and has taught graduate level inorganic chemistry courses. He has published texts and study guides for general chemistry and has been active in the local and national chapters of the American Chemical Society. He has also spent several years as vice president of Student Affairs. He holds a bachelor’s degree in chemistry from the University of Toledo and a Ph.D. from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1969.

Mary A. Higby

Associate Professor of Marketing, teaches marketing management, marketing strategy, retailing and consumer behavior. She has published articles in the Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, The Journal of Marketing Management, Management Review. Her research interests include consumer behavior, marketing strategy, and marketing information systems. Her current research involves teen’s and generation X’s buying behavior. She received the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence in 1995. Higby worked at Amway Corporation, Sears Roebuck & Company, and AT & T before coming to UDM. She holds a Ph.D., M.B.A., M.A. and B.S. from Michigan State University. She joined the University in 1989.

Patricia S. Higo

Associate Librarian, Head of Reference, Outer Drive Campus Library, manages and directs the Reference Department operations and provides reference service and research skills instruction. Her collection development responsibilities include communication studies and all reference titles in the Outer Drive Campus Library. Higo holds a B.A. degree from the University of Michigan and a M.S.L.S. from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1979.

Elizabeth M. Hill

Associate Professor of Psychology, teaches physiological psychology, statistics, and research methods. Her research has focused on the developmental psychopathology of alcoholism, particularly the interaction between biological vulnerability and specific environmental factors that facilitate or impede its development. She has served as an assistant research scientist and methodologist on various project teams. Other research has focused on genetic markers associated with alcoholism, parental investment and factors related to successful aging. She holds a B.A. degree from the University of Michigan, M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Tulane University, and a M.S. degree from Louisiana State University. She joined the University in 1997.

Clint Hirst

Professor of English, teaches Romantic and Victorian literature, the novel, fiction, composition, and poetry. He teaches in the Honors and Women’s Studies programs. His greatest interests lie in Jane Austen, George Eliot, Keats, and Browning. He holds B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Notre Dame and a M.A. from the University of Michigan. Hirst joined the University in 1972.

Alan S. Hoback

Associate Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, teaches structural analysis and design of steel, reinforced concrete and prestressed concrete. Hoback’s publications have dealt with structural optimization. He is currently doing research in the areas of prestressed concrete, pile foundations, optimization and computer aided design. Hoback holds a B.A. degree from Hastings College and B.S., M.S., and Sc.D. degrees from Washington University. He joined the University in 1994.

Barbara Hollar

Professor of Biology, teaches genetics, embryology and general biology. Specializing in human genetics, her research uses recombinant DNA methodology to study human disease. She holds a B.A. from Bucknell University and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. She joined the University in 1979.

Robert J. Homant

Professor and Chair of Criminal Justice Studies and Director of Human Services, teaches deviant behavior and corrections courses, statistics and research methods, and ethics in the human services. Homant has published over 60 professional articles regarding police behavior and offender rehabilitation. He currently does research on the validity of criminal profiling. Homant holds an A.B. from the University of Detroit and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in Clinical Psychology from Michigan State University. He joined the University in 1978.

Susan J. Homant

Associate Librarian, Head of Reference, McNichols Campus Library, manages and directs the Reference Department operations and provides reference service and research skills instruction. She is responsible for collection development in African American studies and all subject areas for the McNichols Campus Reference Department. She received her B.A. in Social Work from Michigan State University and her M.S.L.S. from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1985.

Petra D. Hurt

Assistant Director of the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital Nurse Anesthesiology Program at UDM, teaches the course, Introductory Principles of Nurse Anesthesiology, as well as selected topics in advanced principles of nurse anesthesiology, and pathophysiology. Her current research interests include postoperative nausea and vomiting and universal precautions as they apply to anesthesia equipment and personnel. She received her B.S.N. from Oakland University and M.S. in Anesthesia from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1990.

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JoAnne Isbey

Associate Professor of English, teaches language and literature. Her professional presentations focus on theoretical applications to medieval literature. Currently, she is doing phenomenological research on student growth in reading and writing. Recently she has been attracted to works that are more inclusive: bridging workplace and community service with the academy. Isbey holds A.B. and A.M. degrees from the University of Michigan. Her dissertation topic is "The Shadow Archetype in Grettis saga Ásmundarsouar." Isbey joined the University in 1964.

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Brigid Johnson, R.S.M

Instructor of Mathematics, teaches basic developmental mathematics, and math analysis, and tutors in UAAS. She received a B.A. from Mercy College of Detroit, a M.A.T.M. from the University of Detroit, and a M.A. from Catholic University of America in Washington, D.C. Johnson worked in Campus Ministry at Mercy College from 1977-1990, and also served as adjunct professor of mathematics and religious studies. She currently studies the pedagogy of math teaching/learning and alternative, more effective, ways of teaching math to those with extreme math phobia. She joined the University in 1977.

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Justin J. Kelly, S.J.

Associate Professor of Religious Studies, teaches literature and theology, and systematic theology. He was a Warren Distinguished Visiting Professor at the University of Tulsa in 1991. He holds A.B. and M.A. degrees from Loyola University in Chicago, a Licentiate in Theology from Woodstock College, and a Ph.D. degree from Yale University. He joined the University in 1972.

Mary Kelly, RSM

Assistant Professor and Chair of Health Services Administration, teaches graduate courses in health care management. She recently completed her doctoral dissertation on factors that influence hospital readmission of healthy newborns. Kelly holds a B.A. from Mercy College of Detroit, M.B.A. from Michigan State University and Doctor of Public Health in Health Policy from University of Michigan’s School of Public Health. She joined the University in 1995.

Daniel B. Kennedy

Professor of Criminal Justice Studies and Security Administration, former probation officer and police trainer, teaches criminology, victimology, law enforcement theories, multicultural understanding, and the nature of United States private security. Kennedy is a forensic consultant in civil litigation across the United States in cases involving negligent security, police pursuits, use of force, and jail suicides. He is a licensed certified social worker with professional designations as a certified protection professional and a certified clinical sociologist. He earned his B.A., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees at Wayne State University. Kennedy joined the University in 1975.

Ram Kesavan

Professor of Marketing, teaches in the areas of marketing/entrepreneurship. He has counseled over 300 small businesses, mostly minority owned. He has authored over 50 articles and a manuscript on international strategic marketing. Some of his work has been published in the Journal of Consumer Research and the Journal of Academy of Marketing Science. He has served as the Sam Walton Free Enterprise Fellow. He is the treasurer of the Marketing Management Association. Kesavan has a Ph.D. from the University of Rochester. He joined the University in 1980.

Julie Ju-Youn Kim

Assistant Professor of Architecture, teaches architectural design, visual communications, and construction. Her research and interests lie in exploring the relationship between home and work with evolving developments in technology; in new settlement patterns in housing and landscape; and in investigating the link between technology and the craftsman. In addition to teaching, she is also a partner and co-founder of an architectural practice as well as a design-build company in Detroit. Her professional work includes mutli-function urban developments, loft renovations, commercial, and residential projects. She received her B.A. in Architecture from Wellesley College and her Master of Architecture from Massachusetts Institute of Technology. She joined the University in 1996 as an adjunct professor and then, in 1997, as a full-time faculty member.

Suk Hi Kim

Professor of Finance, teaches international finance. He has authored and coauthored 14 finance textbooks and 60 refereed journal publications. In the Journal of International Business Studies, Kim was cited as one of the top 25 international business researchers in the 1980s. He was a Fulbright scholar of international finance at Yonsei University in Seoul, Korea during 1992. Kim is the editor of Multinational Business Review and serves on a number of academic journals. He received a M.B.A. from Pepperdine University and Ph.D. in Finance from St. Louis University. He joined the University in 1977.

Brian Kipp

Assistant Professor in the Department of Basic Clinical Sciences, teaches both graduate and undergraduate Pathophysiology courses. Currently Kipp is conducting research (in association with Wayne State University) into a concerted mechanism of electron transfer. He obtained his B.S. degree from Saginaw Valley State University and recently completed his Ph.D. at Wayne State University. Kipp is a member of the Biophysical Society and regularly presents at the annual meeting. He also is a member of the Michigan Chapter of Neuroscience and the American Association for the Advancement of Science. Kipp joined the University in 2001.

Daniel Klempner

Research Professor of Chemical Engineering. His research, which has resulted in 147 publications, 19 books, and 15 patents, is in polymer (plastics) science and engineering, with an emphasis on polyurethanes, plastic recycling, polymer alloys and interpenetrating networks. He has received numerous best paper and best project awards from scientific and engineering societies. Klempner holds a B.S. from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, a M.S. from Williams College, and a Ph.D. from the State University of New York at Albany. He joined the University in 1972.

Debra A. Knight

Assistant Professor, Physician Assistant Program, teaches Patient Evaluation Practicum I, II and III. Knight also practices as a physician assistant at Specialists in Family Practice/Providence Hospital in Novi. She completed a bachelor of science at Western Illinois University, a Master of Science in Physician Assistant at University of Detroit Mercy and a Master of Science in Adapted Physical Education at Illinois State University. Her area of interest is sports medicine. Knight has held numerous positions in sports medicine/athletic training in the the 16 years prior to becoming a certified physician assistant. She also served for more than 10 years as a member of the USA Medical Staff for track and field/cross-country and was selected to work at the Olympic Games in Los Angeles. she joined the University in 2001.

Christian Koontz, RSM

Professor of English, teaches rhetoric and rhetorical analysis, literature, linguistics, literary criticism, creative process, and writing. Koontz’s research and publications focus on writing to learn, heal, and create, as in the recent article, "Cultivating Multiple Intelligences through the Living Journal." Koontz holds a B.A. degree from Mercyhurst College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from The Catholic University of America, where she held a fellowship. She joined the University in 1980.

David R. Koukal

Assistant Professor of Philosophy, teaches introductory philosophy, ethics, phenomenology, existentialism, and critique of electronic media. His research centers on the problem of phenomenological expression, and he publishes articles on Husserl, Heidegger, Merleau-Ponty and Sartre. He is becoming increasingly interested in initiating phenomological investigations of urbanity and mediated experience and has an abiding interest in social and political questions. Koukal holds a B.A. degree from Shimer College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Duquesne University in Pittsburgh. He joined the University in 2000.

Richard L. Kowalczyk

Professor of English, is reputed to give his best and to demand that students go beyond their self perceived limits in Victorian and modern British literature. He has expertise in technical writing based on professional consulting and publications. He has published several articles on writers’ response to cultural issues, with special attention given to popular fiction; current research is on the rise and fall of novelist Marie Corelli, her letters as fiction and reaction of readers. Kowalczyk is an editorial reader for Modern Literature, a promoter of [SIC], and an advisory board member for the journal, Post/Identity. He holds a Ph.D. degree from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1961.

Jiri E. Kresta

Research Professor of Chemical Engineering, has taught polymer courses and is currently involved in research in the following polymer areas: kinetics, catalysis, structure-properties relationships, polyurethanes, composites, and cellular materials. Kresta has over 100 publications and his recent publications and presentations cover plastics recycling, especially the chemical recycling of thermosets. Kresta holds the M.Ch.E. and M.S. in nuclear technology from the Institute of Chemical Technology (Prague, Czech Republic) and a Ph.D. in Polymer Science from the Czech Academy of Science (Prague, CR). Kresta joined the University in 1971.

Mohan Krishnan

Professor of Electrical Engineering, teaches electronics, communications, controls, and signal processing. His area of expertise is in digital signal processing, in particular its application to pattern recognition problems involving both 1-D and 2-D signals. He has published extensively in the areas of voice and handwritten signature recognition. He holds a Bachelor of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology (Madras, India), a Master of Technology degree from the Indian Institute of Technology (Kanpur, India), and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Windsor (Ontario, Canada). He joined the University in 1984.

Albert Ku

Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, teaches introductory statics, advanced elasticity, structural dynamics, soil dynamics, finite element method, and plates and shells. His research interests are in the areas of viscoelasticity, structural stability, vibration and the method of finite elements. He is currently working on two texts: Finite Element Structural Analysis and Theory of Elastic Structures, which summarize his many years of teaching experiences on these subjects. Ku holds a B.S.C.E. from the National Taiwan University, M.S.C.E. from Virginia Polytechnic Institute (and University), and Ph.D from Ohio State University. He joined the University in 1964.

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Stephen J. LaGrassa

Associate Dean, School of Architecture, Professor of Architecture, teaches sustainable/energy conscious design and professional practice in addition to third year architectural design studio. His interests also include music and the performing arts. LaGrassa has been a supernumerary for six Michigan Opera Theatre productions. His architectural practice includes consulting as well as design of residential and office environments. He studied architecture at the University of Detroit where both his Bachelor and Master of Architecture degrees were awarded. LaGrassa has held his professional license since 1975. He joined the University in 1975.

Cynthia A. Langham

Assistant Professor of Communication Studies, teaches fundamentals of speech, interpersonal communication, persuasion, small group communication, and theories of listening behavior, and serves as the director of the Communication Studies Department’s internship program. Langham’s professional presentations have dealt with listening within the workplace and teacher/student classroom interaction. She has been featured in the Detroit Free Press and on WJR radio. She is a recipient of the Sears-Roebuck Foundation Teaching Excellence and Campus Leadership Award. Langham holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Eastern Michigan University. She joined the University in 1984.

Katherine C. Lanigan

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, teaches analytical chemistry, including quantitative analysis and instrumental analysis. Her research utilizes both analytical and physical chemistry for the study of absorption of metal chelating ligands at the aqueous solution/solid interface of metal oxide thin film. She received a B.S. degree in Chemistry from the University of Dayton and a Ph.D. degree in Chemistry from the University of Iowa. Lanigan joined the University in 2001.

Susan M. Latta

Assistant Professor of English, teaches rhetoric, literature and linguistics. Latta’s publications include essays on mass media in the classroom, student self-assessment, and critical research methodologies. Her national and regional professional presentations have focused on qualitative research methodologies, writer’s block, collaborative classroom pedagogues, and cultural studies. Her current research interests include participatory action research and computer assisted instruction. Latta holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Indiana State University and a Ph.D. from Purdue. She joined the University in 1996.

David G. Lee

Director, Manufacturing Engineering program, coordinates the BMfgE program at Focus:HOPE and the on-site BMfgE program at Ford Motor Company. He teaches manufacturing related courses in the Focus:HOPE program. He is the liaison to the Greenfield Coalition where he participates in curriculum development and assessment. Lee has 30 years of experience in manufacturing R&D and in senior engineering management positions in industry. His experience includes responsibility for machining R&D at Ford Motor Co. Research Staff; director of Engineering at Siemens Automotive Fuel Systems Division; and vice president, Engineering at Echlin Inc., a Fortune 500 supplier to the automotive industry. Lee is vice president of the Society of Manufacturing Engineers. He earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Cincinnati. He joined the University in 2000.

Soo-Il Lee

Professor of Chemical Engineering, teaches polymer processing. Lee has interests in the area of interactive computer interfacing using expert system logic for product and process control. He received his B.S., M.S, and Ph.D. degrees in Chemical Engineering from Osaka City University. He joined the University in 1980.

Martin G. Leever

Assistant Professor of Philosophy, teaches ethical theory, professional ethics and the history of philosophy. His research and publications focus on ethical issues in the professions and also on the history of philosophy, especially eighteenth-century Scottish moral philosophy. He also serves as an ethics consultant to social service and health care organizations. Leever holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Marquette University and a Ph.D. from Loyola University of Chicago. He joined the University in 2000.

Joslen L. Letscher

Associate Professor of Education, teaches curriculum inquiry, educational philosophy, policy, supervision, research and field experience. She currently researches and makes professional presentations regarding university/ school collaborations for educational change. Creating spaces for dialogue, imagination, and ethical decision-making is her major research emphasis. Letscher engages in dialectical inquiry with students, teachers, administrators, and colleagues to redefine professional development, curriculum, renewal policymaking, and research. She holds a B.S. and M.A. from Siena Heights College, a M.A. from Western Michigan University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Letscher joined the University in 1991.

Lyn Lewis

Associate Professor and Chair of Sociology, teaches race relations, family, and urban issues. Her areas of expertise are industrial sociology and African American studies. Lewis is currently completing a book on "The Street Definition of Masculinity: How it is Killing Young Black Males." Her other research interests are male/female relationships, urban violence and cultural diversity. She received the distinguished alumnae award from Grambling State University. Lewis holds a B.A. degree from Grambling State University, M.A. from the University of Tennessee, and Ph.D. from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1973.

Chun-Ju Lin

Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering, teaches circuits, electronics, control systems, communication, electromagnetic fields, antennas and radiation, and electromagnetic compatibility. His areas of expertise are electromagnetic field interaction with biological bodies, electromagnetic compatibility and analog and digital electronic circuit designs. He has published many papers in the areas of antennas and propagation, microwave engineering and electromagnetic compatibility journals. He is the recipient of the 1989 Faculty Award for Excellence from the College of Engineering & Science. He holds a B.S. from National Taiwan University and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Michigan State University. He joined the University in 1969.

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Douglas A. MacDonald

Assistant Professor of Psychology, teaches courses covering life span development, assessment and psychopathology. His recent publications and presentations focus on the measurement of transpersonal and spiritual constructs and on the application of psychometric methods to the development of a comprehensive measurement model of spirituality. He also completed research exploring the relation of spirituality and associated concepts/phenomena to psychological functioning, especially personality. Macdonald received his B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Windsor. He joined the University in 2000.

Daniel D. Maggio

Director of Pre-College Programs in Engineering and Science, coordinates many of the programs offered by the College which service the middle and high school population in the metropolitan Detroit area. Among these are the Detroit Area Pre-College Engineering Program (DAPCEP), the Detroit Technology Awareness Program, and Technology Discovery Day. Maggio served as an instructor in the Mathematics and Computer Science Department for six years before beginning his administrative position in 1995. He received his B.S. and M.A. in Mathematics from the University of Detroit. Maggio joined the University in 1989.

Stephen Manning

Associate Professor of Political Science, teaches comparative and international politics and political theory. Manning’s research focuses on political transitions and democratization in communist and post communist countries. He has written on the cultural, social and economic prerequisites of democracy in Leninist systems, Chinese politics after Deng, contemporary Russian elections, a bibliographic essay on political fiction, and is currently completing a comparative politics text for the National Science Foundation. Manning holds a B.A. degree from the University of Massachusetts-Boston, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Wisconsin-Madison. He joined the University in 1993.

Victoria L. Mantzopoulos

Associate Professor and Chair of Political Science, teaches statistics, American government, public policy, and undergraduate law. Mantzopoulos’ publications and professional presentations both here and abroad have dealt with public opinion polling. She has published a textbook titled Statistics for the Social Sciences. She is currently doing research in the area of public opinion polling and the relationship between bureaucratization and democratization. Mantzopoulos began her academic career at the University of Athens in Greece. She holds a B.A. degree from Ball State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1986.

Anthony C. Martinico

Professor of Architecture, teaches design and architectural history and theory. Martinico is the director of the School of Architecture’s international programs in Warsaw, Poland and in Volterra, Italy. He holds the Arts Bachelor degree, Bachelor of Architecture and MS/CIS degrees from the University of Detroit. Martinico joined the University in 1979.

Oswald A.J. Mascarenhas, S.J.

Charles H. Kellstadt Professor of Marketing, teaches marketing strategy, new product development and global marketing strategies. His research deals with ethics of domestic and global marketing strategies, internet marketing and consumer/computer privacy. He has published in the Journal of Marketing, Journal of the Academy of Marketing Science, Journal of Health Care Marketing, Journal of Consumer Affairs. He holds a M.A. and L.Ph. in Philosophy, S.T.L. in Sacred Theology, M.A. in Economics from UDM, M.B.A. and Ph.D. from the Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania. He was Best Teacher in 1992. Mascarenhas joined the University in 1983.

Thomas C. Mawhinney

Professor of Organizational Behavior and Human Resources Management, teaches organizational behavior, strategic policy and organizational theory. He has published research concerning reinforcement, work motivation and leadership in the Journal of the Experimental Analysis of Behavior and Journal of Organizational Behavior Management; conceptual analysis of work motivation and reinforcement processes in the Academy of Management Review, Journal of Applied Psychology, Organizational Behavior and Human Performance and Performance Improvement Quarterly; and applied research concerning performance improvement in the Journal of Business and Psychology and Journal of Organizational Behavior Management. Mawhinney earned his B.A. and M.S. degrees from the University of South Florida and a Ph.D. from The Ohio State University. He joined the University in 1987.

Judy A. McCown

Associate Professor of Psychology, teaches psychopathology, theories of psychotherapy, behavioral therapy, history and systems, and learning and memory. McCown’s research interests involve studies of information processing in schizophrenia, cognitive-behavioral treatment of affective disorders and psychological sequelae of non-traditional career choices in women. Her honors include University of Detroit’s John J. Muller Psychology Award and the Thomas J. Rumble Fellowship from Wayne State University. McCown holds a B.A. degree from the University of Detroit and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1995.

Linda M. McIntosh

Assistant Director of the St. Joseph Mercy Hospital University of Detroit Mercy Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesiology, teaches two semesters of advanced principles of nurse anesthesiology and guest lectures in two other nurse anesthesiology courses: pathophysiology and respiratory care. Her current research interests are postoperative analgesia and the public perception of the nurse anesthetist. She holds a M.S. from Wayne State University. McIntosh joined the University in 1990.

Norman G. McKendrick, S.J.

Associate Professor of English, teaches English composition and literature, Greek and Latin classics, comparative literature, the structure and function of myth, and epic and early drama. Currently, he is working in rhetoric and continues to publish an occasional poem. McKendrick’s publications have dealt with modern poetry, folk singers, and the texts of Greek Fathers. A graduate of Harvard’s IEM program, he holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from Loyola of Chicago, a Ph.D. degree from Fordham, and Licentiates from West Baden Pontifical University. He joined the University in 1962.

Isaiah McKinnon

Associate Professor of Education, teaches the course, Society and Education. He is the City of Detroit’s former Chief of Police and NBC News, WDIV-TV Detroit’s Safety Consultant, for which he won an Emmy Award. He has authored or co-authored three books and numerous articles on crime victims and has been interviewed on "The Today Show," "Oprah," "Good Morning America," "Rivera Live," and "The History Channel." McKinnon is a national motivational/ inspirational speaker to Fortune 500 companies and schools. He is currently completing two books through Sleeping Bear Press in Ann Arbor/Chelsea, Michigan. He earned his B.A. from Mercy College, M.A. from the University of Detroit and Ph.D. from Michigan State University. He is also a graduate of the FBI National Academy and United States Secret Service School. McKinnon joined the University in 1998.

Sheketa G. McKisick

Assistant Professor of Education, teaches methods of secondary English and introduction to secondary teaching courses. McKisick’s research primarily examines the preparation of secondary pre-service teachers within a multicultural and multiracial context. She has presented her research at several national conferences and was selected as a Holmes Scholar for the University of Arkansas. She received a B.S.E. from Henderson State University, M.Ed. from the University of Arkansas, Pine Bluff and Ph.D. from the University of Arkansas. She joined the University in 2000.

Kristine A. McLonis

Associate Librarian, works in the Cataloging and Database Management Department of the McNichols Campus Library, catalogs library items and helps to maintain the accuracy and integrity of the on-line catalog shared by various libraries in the metropolitan Detroit area. Through her cataloging and authority control work, McLonis also contributes to the holdings of an international library database. She does collection development in the area of women's studies. McLonis holds a B.A. in Music from Marygrove College and a M.L.I.S. from Wayne State University. She joined the library faculty in 1995.

Suzanne Mellon

Dean, College of Health Professions and McAuley School of Nursing, has taught psychiatric/mental health, research, leadership and management, and community mental health. She teaches family content in the graduate program and theoretical foundations of nursing. Her area of specialization in is psychiatric mental health nursing and family mental health. Her area of research expertise and interest is in family survivorship of a cancer illness. She holds a B.S.N. from the University of Michigan, a M.S. in nursing from Ohio State University, and a Ph.D. from Wayne State University. Mellon received the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence in 1996 and the first Doctoral Nursing Student Fellowship from the Helen Newberrry Joy Foundation in 1996. She joined the University in 1989.

Bahman Mirshab

Associate Professor of Management Science Information Systems and Associate Dean of Graduate Programs and Academic Affairs, has taught in various areas including system dynamics, project management, simulation, information systems, management science, economics and decision making. Mirshab’s publications and professional presentations deal with system dynamics, income tax, simulation, management science, and information systems. His latest publication, System Dynamics: a Survey, relates to a very new and fast growing field of knowledge called system dynamics. Mirshab earned his Ph.D. degree from Wayne State University, M.A. from University of Detroit and B.A. from Tehran University in Iran. He joined the University in 1979.

Stephanie Mitchem

Assistant Professor of Religious Studies, teaches black religion, womanist theology, and women’s studies. Mitchem has had extensive professional experience in religious education, pastoral ministry, and community organizations. She has served as director of Student Development and Campus Ministry for the UDM Outer Drive Campus. She holds a B.A. from Sacred Heart Seminary College, a Master of Theological Studies degree from St. John Provincial Seminary and a Ph.D. from Northwestern University and Garrett Evangelical Seminary. Mitchem joined the University in 1995.

David Moody

Associate Librarian in the Cataloging and Database Management Department, McNichols Campus Library. As senior member of the department, he helps to ensure the accurate description and access of library materials. He has conducted many statewide workshops on various cataloging topics. Moody received a B.A. in History from the University of Michigan-Dearborn in 1974, and a M.S.L.S. from Wayne State University in 1981. He joined the University in 1982.

Jerry J. Morris

Assistant Professor of Education, teaches courses in secondary curriculum and methods, social studies methods, course design and introduction to secondary education. Morris was a high school social studies teacher and administrator for the Plymouth-Canton Community School District. He has presented at Michigan Council for the Social Studies and Michigan Science Teacher Association state conferences. He has designed sample lessons for the inquiry strand of the Michigan Social Studies Standards and Benchmarks. Major research emphasis is on development of civic efficacy through service and project-based learning. He holds a B.A. cum laude and M.A. from Western Michigan University and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. Morris joined the University in 1999.

Ujamaa James Mosby

Assistant Professor of Economics, teaches economic theory and applied economics. He has worked as an industrial engineer and a quality control engineer in the private sector. Mosby’s publications and presentations are in the areas of urban economics and economics education. He has received grants from the Joint Council on Economic Education to train urban educators. Currently, he is a Ph.D. candidate in Economics at Wayne State University. Mosby holds B.S. and M.A. degrees from the University of Detroit. He joined the University in 1972.

Sharon S. Moser

Instructor and Academic Coordinator, Physician Assistant Program, teaches Clinical Medicine I, II, III with the assistance of community clinical lecturers. Moser is involved in the practice of neurology and maintains a clinical license in psychology and is a certified physician assistant. Moser holds a B.A. degree from Bloomfield College and master degrees from American University, Wayne State University and the University of Detroit Mercy. She previously held a teaching position at American University in Washington, D.C. She joined the University in 2000.

Cyrus K. Motlagh

Associate Professor of Management Science, teaches statistics. Motlagh’s publications and presentations include quality, diet optimization, non-parametrics, real estate and graphical representation of multivariate data. He published a book entitled, Long Range Planning of Electrical Power. A recipient of research grants at UDM and the University of Michigan, Motlagh holds a B.E.E. from Ohio State University, a M.E. from the University of Detroit, M.B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from University of Michigan and a J.D. from Wayne State University. Except for a six year entrepreneurial leave when he headed an international consulting and investment banking firm abroad, Motlagh has been with the University since 1973.

Karim H. Muci-Kuchler

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, teaches course in mechanics, computer aided design, finite element analysis and design methodologies. His main research interests and publications are in the field of boundary elements, focusing on the formulation of higher order elements and adaptive meshing techniques. He received the 1998 teaching and research award of the College of Engineering of ITESM, Monterrey Campus. Muci holds a B.S. and M.E. from ITESM, a Ph.D. from Iowa State University, and he is a registered engineer in Mexico. Muci served as an associate professor at ITESM. He joined the University in 1999.

John C. Mueller

Professor of Architecture, teaches design and visual communications. Mueller holds a B.S.A. from the University of Detroit. His activities as an architect focus primarily on the design of small wood structures as well as furniture making and design. Mueller joined the University in 1977.

Cheryl Munday

Assistant Professor of Psychology, teaches personality theory, professional ethics, child therapy, advanced clinical case conference and the psychological evaluation practicum in the doctoral program. Her publications and presentations focus on racial and ethnic influences in psychoanalytic psychotherapy and on psychiatric diagnosis. Current research interests include racial and ethnic influences on clinical judgement and indices of psychological functioning and testing. Prior to joining UDM, she was director of Psychology and Psychology Training at Detroit Psychiatric Institute. She also served as consultant to Sinai-Grace Hospital and the Program for Research on Black Americans at the Institute for Social Research, University of Michigan. Munday holds a B.A. from Cornell University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from University of Michigan. She joined the University in 1997.

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Wendy Norfleet

Assistant Professor of Computer and Information Systems, teaches Computer Information Systems. She has more than 10 years of industry experience in software engineering ranging from programmer to manager of software quality assurance and testing. Norfleet holds a B.A. in CIS from Detroit College of Business, a M.S. in CIS from University of Detroit Mercy, and is currently pursuing her doctorate in Instructional Technology at Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1999.

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Joseph Odoerfer

Professor of Architecture, teaches architectural design, environmental technology, vernacular architecture, and principles of structural behavior. Odoerfer’s research investigates the relationship between technology and aesthetic perception. An article stemming from this research titled, "The Poetics of Thermal Technology" was published in Architecture, the City, and Technology. Odoerfer is a registered architect who practices on a part-time basis. He received the AIA School Medal, and in 1994 was named Michigan College Architectural Educator of the Year. Odoerfer holds the B.S. and M. Arch degrees from the University of Detroit. He taught at North Dakota State University before joining the University in 1987.

Marcel O’Gorman

Assistant Professor of English, teaches courses that combine theory and practice in the creation of digital media projects. He is also director of the Electronic Critique program at UDM. His areas of interest range from the poetry and painting of William Blake to pop culture and critical theory. He has published essays and hypertexts on these subjects. O’Gorman’s most recent work involves designing a mode of scholarly writing more suitable to a digital/visual culture. He holds a B.A. in French and English from the University of Windsor, M.A. in English from the University of Ottawa, M.A. in Creative Writing from the University of Windsor and Ph.D. in English from the University of Florida, where he specialized in media studies and eighteenth-century literature. O’Gorman joined the University in 2000.

Elizabeth A. Oljar

Assistant Professor and Chair of Philosophy, teaches ethical theory, applied ethics, philosophy of law, political philosophy, and epistemology. She also teaches courses in women’s studies. Oljar’s area of expertise is ethics. In 1995, she was awarded an Excellence in Teaching Award by the University of Washington. Oljar holds a B.A. degree from Portland State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Washington. She joined the University in 1996.

John D. O’Neill, S.J.

Professor of Mathematics, teaches most undergraduate mathematics including business mathematics, linear algebra, and calculus. He also teaches graph theory, discrete mathematics and abstract algebra at the undergraduate and graduate level. He has published many articles on algebra in various journals including: Proceedings of the American Mathematics Society, Proceedings of the London Mathematics Society and the Journal of Algebra. He received degrees in classics, philosophy, mathematics and theology from Loyola University in Chicago and his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1962.

Mary S. O’Shaughnessey

Project Director, Greater Detroit Area Partnership for Training and Adjunct Faculty, College of Health Professions, coordinates the internships for HSA undergraduates and graduates. She has extensive experience as a practitioner, director and consultant to integrated health care systems. O’Shaughnessey holds a B.A. from Ohio State University, a M.Sc. and an M.H.S.A. from the University of Michigan, Certificate of Clinical Competence in Audiology and Certificate in Education from the State of Michigan. She joined the University in 1999.

Mark J. Ottenbreit

Professor and Chair of Biology, teaches introductory biology, cell and molecular biology, pathophysiology and hematology. Ottenbreit’s publications and professional presentations have dealt with cell culture identification. He currently is working in DNA fingerprinting as a tool to identify cell cultures. Ottenbreit holds a B.A. degree from the University of Detroit and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1984.

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Melinda Pacha

Associate Professor and Chair of Theatre, teaches introduction to theatre and scenic design. She is also scenic and costume designer for UDM’s Theatre Company where she works actively with students in various aspects of production. Pacha also works with many professional theatres in the area. Her work in both academic and professional theatre has received recognition from both The Detroit News and the Detroit Free Press. Pacha holds a B.A. degree from the University of Northern Iowa where she received a Presidential Award for Outstanding Achievement in Theatre Arts. She holds a M.F.A. degree from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1981.

Christine M. Pacini

Assistant Dean and Associate Professor of Nursing, teaches adult health, research, and leadership/management. Her professional presentations and publications have focused on circadian rhythms, sleep-wake patterns, shared governance, and organizational change. She is presently engaged in research on acute pain and sleep-wake responses of neurosurgical patients. She was a recent recipient of a National Research Service Award in Neuroscience/Neurobehavior at the University of Michigan. She holds a B.A. from University of Detroit, B.S.N. from Mercy College of Detroit, M.S.N. from Wayne State University, and a Ph.D. from the University of Michigan. She joined the University in 1996.

Christine M. Panyard

Professor and Chair of Psychology, teaches honors introductory psychology, abnormal psychology and adult development, aging, psychological assessment, psychopathology and supervises the practicum in the graduate program. Panyard’s publications and professional presentations have dealt with police stress, substance abuse, and divorce and family issues including invited contributions to six special editions of the Family Law Journal. She consults with police departments on selection and crisis intervention and with substance abuse agencies on dual diagnosis and outcome research. Panyard holds B.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University and a M.A. from Bowling Green State University. She joined the University in 1986.

Mark J. Paulik

Professor of Electrical Engineering, teaches design, digital logic, controls, and digital signal processing. His area of expertise is in digital image processing, where his extensive publications have focused on industrial and military object identification, and handwritten signature analysis. He is currently doing research on the combined use of genetic algorithms and wavelet modeling. He holds a Bachelor of Electrical Engineering degree from the University of Detroit, a Science Master’s degree from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, and a Ph.D. degree from Oakland University. He joined the University in 1984.

Thomas F. Pawlick

Assistant Professor of Journalism/ Communications, teaches reporting, news writing, feature writing, editing and page layout (QuarkXpress and Photoshop); serves as advisor to the Westsider and Varsity News student newspapers. His areas of special interest include reporting on international affairs, ethnic/cultural diversity, science and the environment. He has 20 years of experience as a reporter/ editor, working for the Detroit News, Associated Press and Montreal Gazette, as well as 10 years as a foreign correspondent. He authored six published books, including three journalism textbooks. He previously taught at Carleton University and Algonquin College, Ottawa, Canada, and Higher Colleges of Technology, United Arab Emirates. Pawlick earned his B.A. from University of Detroit and M.A. from Carleton University. He joined the University in 1999.

George W. Pickering

Professor of Religious Studies, teaches social ethics, Christian social thought (especially in America), theories and issues of justice, religion and science, and American religion. Pickering’s publications and professional presentations have dealt with the American civil rights movement; development of American religious liberalism; and ethical issues in contemporary society. He is a member of the American Society of Christian Ethics and the American Academy of Religion. Pickering holds an A.B. from Bates College and B.D., M.A., and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. He joined the University in 1970.

Dan Pitera

Assistant Professor of Architecture and Director of Operations, Detroit Collaborative Design Center, teaches design and visual communications. As a practicing architect, he brings to UDM an intense interest and expertise in the making of architecture, its connection with other disciplines, and its existence as a cultural and political event. Most recently, his interest focuses on the implications of human body modification (tattoo, make-up, piercing) on architecture. Pitera is a registered architect in the State of California. He held the Hyde Chair of Excellence at the University of Nebraska in 1998. In San Francisco, Pitera was president of CfCA/2AES, director of Professional Programs at California College of Arts and Crafts, as well as having his own practice. His teaching experience includes the University of California, Berkeley; California College of Arts and Crafts, San Francisco; University of Kansas and University of Nebraska. Pitera received his M. Arch degree at Georgia Tech. He joined the University in 1999.

Kirstie Plantenberg

Assistant Professor of Mechanical Engineering, teaches engineering graphics, statics and dynamics. Her areas of expertise include tribology, dynamics, vibrations, controls and engineering graphics. Her research interests lie in tribology, specifically the effects of vibrations on friction. She holds a Ph.D. in Mechanical Engineering from Wayne State University. Before joining UDM, she taught for several years at Wayne State University and two years at Minnesota State University, Mankato. She also has worked at General Motors Corporation Inland Division and was involved in testing the safety and strength of new seat designs and designed new testing fixtures. She joined the University in 2000.

Hriday R. Prasad

Director of the Master of Science in Product Development program. Prior to joining the University, he served at Ford Motor Company for 29 years followed by assignments at three tier–1 suppliers. At Ford, his assignments ranged from manufacturing floor responsibilities to product development and to advanced engineering and manufacturing planning. At the tier suppliers, his responsibilities included strategic planning, operations, and global business development. He taught for 10 years as an adjunct at the University of Michigan and was also active in conducting high-tech seminars and industrial study missions to Japan and South Korea. Prasad holds a B.S. in Mechanical Engineering, a Master’s in Industrial Engineering and MBA degrees. He joined the University in 1998.

Gail M. Presbey

Assistant Professor of Philosophy, teaches introductory courses in philosophy and ethics, African philosophy and culture, peace and social justice and other courses related to social and political philosophy. Her interests are in cross-cultural and feminist explorations in philosophy and the philosophy of non violence. Her interests in social and political philosophy revolve around the work of Hannah Arendt and feminist critics. She is first editor of an introductory philosophy text, The Philosophical Quest: A Cross Cultural Reader, now in its second edition. She has authored many journal articles and book chapters, and recently held a two-year J. William Fulbright Senior Scholar position at University of Nairobi, Kenya. Presbey has a B.A. from University of Detroit and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Fordham University. She joined the University in 2000.

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Patrick J. Quinn

Co-chair of Nurse Anesthesiology, Interim Program Director of Henry Ford Hospital affiliate component. Didactic and Clinical Instructor, teaches anesthesia for kidney and pancreas transplant surgery, anesthesia neuropharmacology, and care development. His research background includes his original master’s thesis which analyzed patients post-operative knowledge and satisfaction levels. Currently he chairs three research projects yearly and has published an article relating to the preemptive effects of oral acetaminophen on pediatric patients. He received his B.S.N. from Wayne State University and a M.S. in Nurse Anesthesia from University of Detroit Mercy. Quinn joined the University in 1997.

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Mary R. Raftery

Interim Clinical Education Coordinator, Henry Ford Hospital affiliate component. Didactic and clinical instructor, teaches geriatric anesthesia, OB anesthesia review and neuroanesthesia. Currently she is chairperson for three research projects and her original master’s thesis included analyzing the effects of multiple blood transfusions on the hypothermic penetrating trauma patient. Raftery holds a B.S.N. from Mercy College of Detroit and M.S. in Nurse Anesthesia from University of Detroit Mercy. She joined the University in 2000.

David L. Regal

Assistant Professor of Theatre and Artistic Director for The Theatre Company, teaches fundamentals of acting and acting dynamics. Regal’s performance experience includes professional stage appearances, industrial video, and feature films. In his 30 years in theatre, he has directed several world premieres, including Jane Martin’s Criminal Hearts. Recipient of a host of Best Actor and Director awards, Regal expanded his expertise to Europe by directing a production of the Gravity of Honey at the Dublin Theatre Festival. He holds a B.A. degree from San Francisco State University and a M.F.A. from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1972.

Beverly A. Reppert

Assistant Librarian, Public Services, Outer Drive Campus Library. She provides reference service and research skills instruction. She is responsible for collection development in religion, psychology, addiction studies, and counseling. Reppert holds a B.A. degree in History from Mercy College of Detroit and a M.S.L.S. degree in Library Science from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1974.

Alexa N. Rihana-Abdalla

Assistant Professor of Civil & Environmental Engineering, teaches courses on water and wastewater treatment, environmental chemistry, environmental microbiology and other environmental related topics. Her publications and presentations deal with physicochemical and biological processes and their role in determining contaminant bioavailability and the potential of in-situ bio-remediation. Dr. Rihana is a graduate of the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor. She joined the University in 2000.

Jennifer L. Rike

Associate Professor of Religious Studies, teaches theology. Her publications and professional presentations have dealt with contemporary Roman Catholic theology, the Christian concept of love, and feminist theology. Currently she is exploring the paradoxical relationship between violence and religion. She edited and introduced a volume of essays in honor of David Tracy, Radical Pluralism and Truth. She is an ordained minister in the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). She holds a B.A. degree from the University of Michigan and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago Divinity School. Rike joined the University in 1995.

Elizabeth S. Roberts-Kirchhoff

Assistant Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, teaches biochemistry. Her research focuses on the cytochrome P450 enzymes and their mechanism of action and role in the metabolism of drugs and natural products. Particular emphasis is on plant compounds that are cancer chemopreventive agents whose mode of action may include their interaction with the cytochrome P450 enzymes. Roberts-Kirchhoff received a B.S. in Chemistry from Texas A & M University and Ph.D. in Biological Chemistry from University of Michigan. She completed postdoctoral research at Wayne State University and the University of Michigan. Roberts-Kirchhoff joined the University in 1997.

Donna M. Roe

Senior Librarian, Head of Cataloging and Database Management Department, McNichols Campus Library, teaches English, religious studies and education for Native American and diversity topics. She provides bibliographies for diversity holdings and maintains a webliography of multicultural titles. Roe has been the recipient of faculty development awards for the National Women Studies Association, the American Popular Culture Association, the 2000 International Teaching for Intelligence Conference and the 2001 AAUP Faculty/ Administrator Co-Conference. She has been awarded memberships in Kappa Delta Pi (International Honor Society), Pi Lambda Theta (National Educational Honor Society) and Beta Phi Nu (National Library Science Honor Society). Roe has a B.A. from Michigan State University, a M.L.S. from the University of Michigan, a M.A. from the University of Detroit Mercy and has, in progress, a M.A. in Higher Education Curriculum Development at Siena Heights University. She joined the University in 1992.

Nicholas Rombes

Associate Professor of English, teaches composition, technical writing, early American literature, and film. Rombes is a contributor to the Heath Anthology of American Literature, and has published articles on The Federalist Papers, Thomas Jefferson, Robert Frost, Salman Rushdie, and numerous early American authors. He is currently working on a book on the terrors of the Enlightenment in early American fiction. Rombes holds a B.S. degree from Bowling Green State University and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Pennsylvania State University. He joined the University in 1995.

Robert A. Ross

Associate Professor of Physics, teaches general physics, modern physics, and solid state electronics along with electrical engineering courses. He has 14 years of industrial research experience in the field of solar energy. His research and publications in the field of amorphous silicon photovoltaic cells helped lead to the development of more efficient solar panels. He is currently doing research on the transport and optical properties of thin films and solid state devices. Ross holds B.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1995.

Patricia Rouen

Assistant Professor of Nursing, teaches the theory and clinical courses in the Family Nurse Practitioner program. Her areas of interest include health education and management of chronic disease in adults. Rouen earned her B.S.N. from the University of Michigan and her M.S.N. from Oakland University. She holds a post-master’s certificate as a family nurse practitioner from Oakland University. Rouen maintains a clinical practice. She joined the University in 1999.

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Farrokh Saba

Assistant Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, teaches mathematics. Saba has published 24 papers in graph theory, combinatorics, and discrete mathematics. He has presented talks in several international mathematics conferences including Japan and China as well as American Mathematical Society meetings. He holds B.Sc., M.Sc., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees in mathematics. Saba received a teaching award from Western Michigan University. He joined the University in 1997.

John A. Saliba, S.J.

Professor of Religious Studies, teaches world religions, anthropology of religion, and new religious movements. Saliba’s publications both here and overseas have dealt with the presence of new religions in the West. His works include two annotated bibliographies and a volume covering the historical, psychological, social, theological, and legal dimensions of this contemporary phenomenon. He has degrees in philosophy and theology from Heythrop College (U.K.), a Diploma in Anthropology from the University of Oxford, and a Ph.D. degree from the Catholic University of America. He joined the University in 1970.

Jane Schaberg

Professor of Religious Studies and Women’s Studies, teaches feminist interpretation, biblical studies and introductions to religious studies and women’s studies. Schaberg’s publications have dealt mainly with the New Testament, including a commentary on the New Testament Infancy Narratives, on the Gospel of Luke, and on feminist contributions to historical and literary research. Her recent research is on the traditions and legends associated with the figure of Mary Magdalene, and on fantasy in the Bible. Schaberg holds a B.A. from Manhattanville College, a M.A. from Columbia University and a Ph.D. from Union Theological Seminary NYC. She joined the University in 1977.

Thomas Schad

Assistant Professor of Economics, teaches microeconomics, macroeconomics, and statistics. His current research interests involve the question of a balanced federal budget. His research also focuses on academic standards. Schad holds a Ph.D. degree from Wayne State University. He joined the University in 1973.

Shulamith Schlick

Professor of Chemistry and Biochemistry, teaches physical and polymer chemistry. Her research is focused on the structure and dynamics of amphiphilic polymers, temporary and permanent gels, and ion-containing polymers; electron spin resonance (ESR) and ER imaging (ESRI) of transport and degradation processes in polymers. She has published more than 150 papers, reviews, and book chapters and has been invited to lecture at numerous national and international meetings. Among her awards are: The President’s Award for Faculty Excellence at UDM in 1990, the Founders’ Fellowship of the American Association of University Women (AAUW) in 1991, and NSF awards for exceptional creativity in research in 1990 and 1998. Schlick holds B.S. in Chemical Engineering, M.S. in Polymer Chemistry, and D.Sc. in Molecular Spectroscopy degrees from the Technion, Israel Institute of Technology. She joined the University in 1983.

Mark R. Schumack

Associate Professor and Chair of Mechanical Engineering, teaches heat transfer, thermodynamics, fluid mechanics, and energy systems. His research interests lie in thermal/fluid modeling using computational techniques, including applications in the automotive and manufacturing fields. He is also currently developing multimedia modules for manufacturing engineering candidates at Focus:HOPE in Detroit. He has recently published articles about numerical techniques for lubrication phenomena and case studies for heat transfer education. Schumack earned his B.S., M.S., and Ph.D. degrees in Mechanical Engineering from the University of Michigan. He joined the University in 1991.

Marie-Lise A. Shams

Associate Librarian, Public Services, Outer Drive Campus Library, provides reference and research skills instruction, manages the nursing and dental collections and is the liaison to the Faculties of the McAuley School of Nursing and the School of Dentistry. Shams holds a B.A. from the University of Alexandria, Egypt, a M.S.L.S. in Library Science from Wayne State University, and is member of the Academy of Health Information Professionals. She joined the University in 1998.

Raphael Shen, S.J.

Professor of Economics, teaches microeconomic theory/analysis, comparative economic systems, development economics and resource economics. Shen’s publications and presentations deal with transitional economics in Eastern Europe. His recent publications include: "Ukraine’s Economic Reform: Obstacles, Errors & Lessons" and "Restructuring the Baltic Economies." He also conducted a one-week lecture series in China on the economics of natural resources, and completed a manuscript on economic reform in Romania. Shen holds a B.A. from Berchmans College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Michigan State University. He joined the University in 1977.

Daniel Shoemaker

Professor of Computer and Information Systems, has 23 years experience in system and software engineering, including six years as a manager of several large MIS/data processing operations. He consults in software configuration and software change management; software process quality management, emphasizing ISO 9000 compliance, software quality assurance, software project management and system specification and design. His doctorate is from the University of Michigan (1978). He joined the University in 1985.

Christine Shrewsbury

Curriculum Coordinator, Assistant Director of Henry Ford Hospital University of Detroit Mercy Graduate Program of Nurse Anesthesiology. She is both a didactic and clinical instructor, teaching a variety of subjects in the principles of nurse anesthesiology courses. Research includes publication of "A Comparative Analysis of Latex Allergy in the Healthy Versus High Risk Pediatric Population" in the AANA Journal. Current research includes an investigative study on Raplon and intraoperative injection of Marcaine in Lap-Tubal operations for post operative pain control. She received a B.S.N. from Madonna University and a M.S. in Nurse Anesthesia from the University of Detroit Mercy. She joined the University in 2000.

Richard Sinacola

Chair and Associate Professor of Counseling and Addiction Studies, teaches counseling theory, treatment, and assessment courses. In the past he has taught courses in substance abuse counseling. He has published and researched in the areas of career interest and private practice. He lectures internationally on ethical practice, psychopharmacology and multicultural competence. He consults with business and industry on clinical issues. He is licensed as a psychologist and a professional counselor in Michigan. He received his A.B. in Psychology from University of Detroit, and holds the M.S.W. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. Sinacola joined the University in 1996.

Michael S. Skaff

Professor of Mathematics and Computer Science, teaches courses at all levels specializing in mathematical analysis, modeling, and computer science. He has been selected mathematics teacher of the year several times. His publications include papers on Orlicz Spaces and applied regression analysis. Skaff is well known both in Michigan and nationally for his contributions to property tax assessing and tax administration. He holds a B.S. from the University of Michigan, M.S. from the University of Illinois, and Ph.D. from UCLA. After employment at Douglas Aircraft Co. and Hughes Aircraft Co., Skaff joined the University in 1968.

Katherine Snyder

Assistant Professor of Mathematics/Computer Science, teaches courses in the calculus, teacher education and computer science sequences, including honors calculus, pascal programming and data structures. She is currently working on a Ph.D. in Computer Science at Wayne State University. Her field of study encompasses artificial neural networks, evolutionary programming, and cultural algorithms. She currently conducts research on self-adaptive systems. Snyder holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from the University of Detroit. She joined the University in 1994.

Yoon K. Song

Professor of Economics, teaches micro and macro economic theory, econometrics, and business forecasting. Song’s publications and professional presentations here and abroad deal with foreign exchange rates, capital markets, automotive industry studies, and the Korean economy. He currently researches globalization and regional integration of the world economy. Song holds a B.A. from Kyung Hee University (Seoul, Korea), a M.B.A. from the University of Miami, and a Ph.D. from the University of Illinois. He joined the University in 1969.

Roland Spickermann

Assistant Professor of History, teaches the social and political history of Germany, modern Europe, capitalism, and China. His research interests are German agrarianism and nationalism in the 19th and 20th centuries. Spickermann is the faculty advisor for Phi Alpha Theta (the history club and national honor society) and the Model United Nations program. He holds a B.A. from the University of California at Berkeley and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Michigan. He joined the University in 1994.

Jill C. Spreitzer

Assistant Librarian, Public Services Outer Drive Campus Library, provides reference services, instruction in database searching, and research skills instruction. She facilitates collection development for the health services administration, physician assistant, and mechanical engineering programs. Spreitzer holds a B.S. degree in Biology from University of Michigan and a M.S.L.S. degree in Library Science from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1999.

Margaret Stack

Associate Professor of Psychology and director of the Psychology Clinic, teaches basic psychoanalytic concepts, group psychotherapy, psychoanalytic treatment techniques, human sexuality, and case conference. She directs clinical training for the Ph.D. program in Clinical Psychology. Stack’s areas of interest include forensic psychology, sexual abuse, psychotherapy outcome, and religious life issues. She currently researches psychotherapy outcome at the University Psychology Clinic. She holds a B.A. from the University of Michigan and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Detroit. She joined the University in 1995.

John M. Staudenmaier, S.J.

Interim Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Education and Professor of History, teaches the history of America, Detroit, technology, advertising, labor and capitalism. Currently, he is studying Henry Ford and the Ford Motor Company. Staudenmaier is the author of Technology’s Storytellers: Reweaving the Human Fabric, as well as articles and book reviews in his field of study. He is also editor of Technology and Culture. He was a Bannon Scholar at Santa Clara University and a Dibner Fellow at MIT. He has received several awards for his teaching. Staudenmaier holds B.A. and M.A. degrees from St. Louis University and a Ph.D. from the University of Pennsylvania. He joined the University in 1981.

H. Robert Steiman

Dean, School of Dentistry, has had a long and distinguished career at the School of Dentistry. He was chair of the Department of Endodontics since 1980. He had previously served as chair of the Department of Physiology and the Department of Basic Sciences, where he has taught since 1967. Steiman holds a Ph.D. in Physiology from the Wayne State University School of Medicine, a D.D.S. from the University of Detroit School of Dentistry, and a M.S.D. and Certificate in Endodontics from the Indiana University School of Dentistry. He joined the University in 1967.

Jonathan E. Stevens

Assistant Professor of Chemistry, teaches physical chemistry, general chemistry, and core curriculum chemistry for non-science and non-engineering majors. His research focuses on the application of theoretical quantum chemistry to gas-phase atmospheric reactions and photochemistry. Stevens holds B.S. degrees in chemistry and mathematics from Miami University of Ohio and a Ph.D. in Chemistry from the University of Chicago. He joined the University in 1998.

Sarah Stever

Associate Professor History, teaches ancient, medieval, Renaissance history, and the history of art and architecture. Her interests include the history of Italy in the Renaissance and early modern France. She is director of the Liberal Arts Summer Study Program in Volterra, Italy and teaches history and art history in Italy in the summer. Gravelle is the author of several articles on Renaissance humanism and philology. She has held fellowships from the Danforth Foundation and the Renaissance Society of America. She holds an A.B. degree from Sarah Lawrence College and a Ph.D. degree from the University of Michigan. She joined the University in 1981.

Carol Stoecklin, R.S.M.

Assistant Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Education, has taught educational field and clinical experiences, school administration, policy studies, and multicultural issues in the classroom. Her publications and presentations deal with clinical experiences in educational settings, multicultural religious education, evaluation, and personnel assessment in education. She produced a seven-module curriculum supplement entitled "Valuing Our Differences." Stoecklin holds a B.A. from Mercy College of Detroit, a M.T.S. from St. John’s Provincial Seminary, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from St. Louis University. She joined the University in 1993.

Carmen Stokes

Assistant Professor of Nursing, teaches Advanced Health Assessment, Primary Care of the Family II and III. Stokes obtained a B.S. in Nursing from Wayne State University and a M.S. in Nursing from University of Detroit Mercy, Certified Family Nurse Practitioner. Work experience includes emergency medicine, intensive care, labor and delivery, and hospital admission. She worked as a community health organizer for a grant-funded project; as well as assistant coordinator for an organ and tissue donation grant-funded project. Most recently, Stokes served as site administrator and nurse practitioner at an adolescent health center. Stokes is a member of Sigma Theta Tau, executive committee member for Lamba Zeta Chapter at UDM, a member of the American Academy of Nurse Practitioners, has affiliations with American Red Cross Youth Resource Committee, Imani Family Health Center and U of M research project—Healthy Environments (steering committee). She joined the University in 2001.

M. Loretta Sullivan, R.S.M.

Assistant Professor of Mathematics, teaches mathematics. She received her B.S. from Mercy College and her M.A. from the University of Detroit, and has done postgraduate studies at Eastern Michigan University and Central Michigan University. Her current interests include mathematics education and curriculum revision. She joined the University in 1986.

Gregory D. Sumner

Professor of History, teaches American history and culture, with special emphasis on the twentieth century. He is the author of Dwight Macdonald and the politics Circle: The Challenge of Cosmopolitan Democracy (Cornell University Press, 1996). Sumner has been a fellow with the Andrew Mellon Foundation, the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, the National Endowment for the Humanities, and he has been honored with a Fulbright Scholarship for January 2001. He holds B.A., M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Indiana University as well as a J.D. from the University of Michigan Law School. He joined the University in 1993.

Eugene A. Swinnerton

Associate Professor of Finance, teaches corporate finance, investments and portfolio management. Swinnerton’s publications and presentations deal with program trading (financial markets), predictive ability of option indices and stock selection techniques. He currently researches market and economic value analysis as it pertains to the enhancement of shareholder value. Swinnerton holds B.A. and M.B.A. degrees from Bowling Green State University and a Ph.D. from Kent State University. He joined the University in 1989.

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Shahram Taj

Professor, Operations Management and Systems Optimization, teaches production/operations management, decision making, simulation, and systems optimization. Taj’s publications and professional presentations deal with optimizing human diet, manufacturing systems design and visual and interactive computer-based manufacturing simulation. A recipient of the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence, he has earned the Beta Gamma Sigma Chapter Award. Taj holds a B.S. from the College of Planning and Computer Applications (Iran), a M.S. from the University of Rhode Island and a Ph.D. from the University of Massachusetts. He joined the University in 1987.

Mary Tracy

Assistant Professor of Basic Clinical Science, teaches gross anatomy to students in the Physician Assistant, Nurse Anesthesia and Nursing programs. Her research focuses on using developmental instability as an indicator of pathological and environmental stress. Tracy received her B.S. from Mercy College of Detroit and her M.S. and Ph.D. from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1999.

James B. Tubbs, Jr.

Associate Professor and Chair of Religious Studies, teaches applied ethics, particularly in health care. Tubbs’ publications and professional presentations deal with Christian theology and the moral issues in biomedicine and health care policy. He serves on several local Institutional Ethics Committees and on the board of the Medical Ethics Resource Network of Michigan. In 1996, he received the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence in the College of Liberal Arts. Tubbs holds a B.S. from Hampden-Sydney College, and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Virginia. He joined the University in 1986.

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Gregory W. Ulferts

Professor of Decision and Information Sciences, teaches decision sciences and information systems. Ulferts’ publications and professional presentations deal with managerial and technical aspects of the decision and information fields. He has engaged in numerous professional activities in small business and strategic management, including lectures internationally. Ulferts has been recognized with outstanding faculty awards and various civic awards. He is extensively involved in community organizations and boards. Ulferts holds a B.S. from Illinois State University and M.B.A. and D.B.A. degrees from Louisiana Tech University. Ulferts served as College of Business Administration dean from 1983-1996. He joined the University in 1983.

Joan C. Urbancic

Professor of Nursing, teaches community health nursing, graduate and undergraduate research methods, families in crisis, and nursing strategies. Her scholarly work focuses on family violence. Current research is on resolving trauma in adult survivors of childhood incest. She was the recipient of the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence at UDM in 1993 and the Nightingale Award finalist in 1992. She earned her B.S., M.S.N., and Ph.D. degrees in Nursing from Wayne State University. Urbancic joined the University in 1988.

Mary Urbanek

Instructor, Clinical Coordinator, Physician Assistant Program, has an extensive background in health care with more than 20 years as an RN working in primary care and emergency medicine, and as a physician assistant for the last five years. In the last three years of practice, Urbanek helped implement a pilot hospitalist program sponsored by a grant through Oakwood Health Care Systems at the Seaway Hospital site in Trenton. Her current clinical practice involves in- and outpatient primary care. Other interests include pulmonology and geriatrics. She has a B.S. in Health Care Administration and an M.S. in Physician Assistant, both from the University of Detroit Mercy. Urbanek joined the University in 2001.

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Aloha Van Camp

Dean, Weekend College and Associate Professor of Social Work, teaches social work practice and human behavior with a multicultural perspective. She has extensive background in mental health. Her research interests and professional presentations deal with portfolio-based assessment models, assessment of critical thinking and issues related to academic success of African American women in higher education. She has previously served as dean of the UDM College of Education and Human Services, chair of Mercy College's Social Work Program and UDM's Social Work Department. Van Camp holds a B.A. from Michigan State University and a M.S.W. from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1990.

Eswara P. Venugopal

Assistant Professor of Physics, teaches general physics courses and laboratories for engineering, life science and architecture students. He has published papers in theoretical atomic and particle physics. His recent research deals with chiral anomalies in photon-hadron interactions. He holds a M.Sc. (tech) degree in Computer Science from the Birla Institute of Technology & Science, India, a M.S. in Physics from Utah State University, and a Ph.D. in Physics from the University of Massachusetts, Amherst. He joined the University in 1998.

Stephen Vogel

Dean of the School of Architecture and Professor of Architecture, teaches design and Introduction to Architecture. Vogel is a licensed architect with extensive experience in urban design, adaptive reuse, historic rehabilitation and multi-family, mixed income housing communities. He is past president of the American Institute of Architects, Detroit Chapter and Michigan Chapter. He was inducted into the College of Fellows of the AIA in 1994 and received the AIA Detroit Gold Medal in 1996. Vogel holds the B.Arch and M.Arch degrees from the University of Detroit. He returned to the University as Dean in 1993.

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Suzanne K. Warnimont

Associate Professor, Program Chair and Director, Physician Assistant Program, teaches health promotion, risk reduction, health care delivery and policy issues, and patient evaluation practicum. Warnimont’s areas of special interest include health behavior, health education and health promotion. She earned her Master’s of Public Health degree from the University of Michigan and B.A. in Physician Assistant from Lake Erie College. Prior to coming to the University of Detroit Mercy, she worked as a physician assistant in family practice, geriatrics and chemical dependence treatment. Warnimont joined the University in 1990.

Karen Mallory Waters

Associate Dean, College of Liberal Arts and Education and Associate Professor of Social Work, spent more than 20 years as a practicing social worker, including five years as executive director of Big Brothers Big Sisters. Her most recent research is in the area of Black student attrition and retention in higher education. Waters received a B.A. in Social Work from Michigan State University and a M.S.W. from the University of Michigan. She is presently pursuing a Ph.D. in Educational Leadership and Policy Studies at Wayne State University. Waters taught at Wayne State University before joining UDM in 1995.

Rosemary Weatherston

Assistant Professor of English, teaches twentieth-century U.S. literatures and cultures. Her primary areas of research and publication include multicultural literatures, feminist, race and post-colonial theories and cultural studies. Currently, she is the co-editor of Post Identity, UDM’s national journal of the humanities, and is the director of the English Department’s Center for Print Culture. She received her B.A. from the University of Michigan and doctorate from the University of Southern California. She joined the University in 2000.

Jonathan M. Weaver

Associate Professor of Mechanical Engineering, teaches statics, dynamics, vehicle dynamics, robotics, computer aided engineering, machine design, mechanical measurements, robust design, systems architecture, and design for x. Weaver’s areas of interest, publications, and/or consulting include robotics, computer aided design, design of experiments, vehicle dynamics, and product development. He holds a B.S degree from Virginia Tech, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute. He joined the University in 1993.

Leonard J. Weber

Professor of Ethics, provides ethics consulting and educational services to off-campus organizations. His work is focused on practical ethical issues in health care, management, and public service. He has served as president of the Medical Ethics Resource Network of Michigan. Weber’s recent publications address the ethics of corporate lobbying and of life-sustaining treatment decision-making. He is the principal author of a regular management ethics column in Clinical Laboratory Management Review. Weber holds a B.A. degree from Josephinum College, a M.A. degree from Marquette University, and a Ph.D. from McMaster University. He joined the University in 1972.

Gerald Wehmer

Professor of Counseling and Addiction Studies, teaches the assessment and treatment of chemically dependent, behaviorally addicted persons with a multicultural focus. Wehmer consults professionally with numerous substance abuse agencies in the tri-county area. He is researching a multicultural approach to the Thematic Apperception Test. Wehmer recently received an award for service to the University. He was a recipient of a United States pre-doctoral internship award at the University of California at Los Angeles. Wehmer holds a B.A. from Columbia College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Vanderbilt University. He joined the University in 1980.

Carol C. Weisfeld

Professor of Psychology, teaches human development, sex differences and sex roles, cross-cultural psychology, human sexuality, and physiological psychology. She is the author of one edited book, and her research on male/female relations has appeared in such journals as Genetic Psychology Monographs and Ethology and Sociobiology. Her current research concerns marital satisfaction in the U.S., England, Turkey, and China. Weisfeld was selected as the 1994 recipient of the President’s Award for Faculty Excellence at UDM. She holds a B.A. from St. Xavier College and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from the University of Chicago. She joined the University in 1979.

Michael D. Whitty

Professor of Management and Labor Relations, teaches management, organizational behavior, international management and collective bargaining. Whitty’s publications and presentations deal with social issues in business, global business values and spirituality in the workplace. He has published in the Labor Law Journal, The Competitiveness Review, Multinational Business Review and the Journal of Change Management. He is currently researching the future of work. Whitty holds an A.B. from the University of Detroit, a M.A. from the University of Michigan and a Ph.D. from Syracuse University. He joined the University in 1967.

Linda G. Williams

Program Director of Waldorf Teacher Education Program, teaches courses on Waldorf philosophy, pedagogy, and methods. Her publications and professional presentations concern Waldorf education, cultural, multicultural and anti-racist education, literacy, and developmental models of cognition. Williams earned a B.A. from Michigan State University and a M.A. from Mercy College. She is currently a doctoral candidate at Michigan State University in the Department of Curriculum, Teaching and Educational Policy. She joined the University in 1996.

Sandra H. Wilson

Associate Librarian, Public Services, McNichols Campus Library, serves as the Electronic Resources Librarian as well as provides reference services and research skills instruction. She is also responsible for collection development in architecture, computer science, criminal justice, and mathematics. She holds a B.S. from Michigan State University and a M.L.I.S. from Wayne State University. Ms. Wilson joined the University in 1997.

Patrick Wirtz

Associate Professor of Accounting, teaches the principles of accounting and other accounting courses. An active practitioner, Wirtz has been a CPA in the State of Michigan since 1971. Additionally, he has conducted numerous courses for the Michigan Association of CPAs and currently serves on their Continuing Professional Education Committee. Wirtz’s current area of research is auditor independence. He earned both his bachelor’s and master’s degrees from the University of Detroit. Wirtz has been on the faculty at California Polytechnic and California State University. He joined the University in 1985.

Michael J. Witkowski

Associate Professor of Criminal Justice Studies, teaches criminal justice, human services and legal administration and administers the Master’s in Security Administration Program. He is a certified protection professional and member of the American Society for Industrial Security. He researches, publishes, and speaks on workplace violence and security measures, and is a frequent media guest on security and criminal justice issues. With the UDM Leadership Development Institute, he encourages community service. He holds a B.S. from Wayne State University, M.A. from Central Michigan University, and Ed.D. from Western Michigan University. Witkowski worked for more than 17 years with Ford Motor Company before joining the University in 1992.

William S. Wittig

Assistant Professor of Architecture, teaches design, design-build and sustainable building practices. Wittig holds a M.Arch. from Cranbrook Academy of Art and a B.Arch. from the University of Kansas. He is also a founding partner of Crossings Architecture, Inc. in Detroit. In both practice and academic pursuits, his work attempts to bridge the distinction between technical and theoretical points of view, focusing on the full-scale medium of building. Wittig joined the University in 2001.

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Han X. Xiao

Research Professor, College of Engineering and Science, teaches the science and technology of adhesion. He is researching urethane ionomers, interpenetrating polymer networks (IPNs) and polymer alloys, in particular coatings, adhesives and sealants, and polymer recycling. He has a master’s degree from the Department of Polymer Chemistry and Chemical Engineering at the Chengdu Institute of Technology (China), and a Ph.D. in Polymer Chemistry from the Chengdu Institute of Organic Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Science. He has 62 publications and seven patents. He joined the University in 1980.

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Sandra A. Yost, CSJ,

Associate Professor of Electrical Engineering, teaches circuits, electronics, control systems, and signal processing. Her research interests include robust control, stability theory, digital control systems and engineering education. Yost recently finished her Ph.D. in Electrical Engineering at the University of Notre Dame, where she was awarded fellowships from the SAE Educational Foundation, the Clare Booth Luce Foundation, and the American Association for University Women. Her B.E.E. and M.Engr. degrees were earned at the University of Detroit in 1981 and 1982. Yost joined the University in 1996.

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Lawrence Zeff

Associate Professor of Management, teaches organization behavior, organization theory and strategic policy. He received a B.A. in Economics from the University of Michigan, M.B.A. in Management from Wayne State University and Ph.D. in Organization Theory from the University of Pittsburgh. He joined the University in 1973.

Kathy Zhong

Associate Professor of Mathematics, teaches mathematics, especially analysis and other high-level mathematics course. Zhong’s research interests include functional analysis, complex analysis, numerical analysis, and innovative teaching of mathematics. Zhong holds B.S. and M.S. degrees from the South China University of Technology, and M.S. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. She joined the University from Coopers & Lybrand in 1992.

Kathleen Zimmerman-Oster

Associate Professor of Psychology and director of Industrial Organizational/ Psychology, teaches general psychology, social psychology, and industrial/organizational psychology. Many of her courses include a service learning component. Her areas of special interest, research and consulting include leadership development, organizational change, and human resource assessment. Zimmerman-Oster also provides consultation and technical assistance in the areas of training, evaluation and survey research to local non-profit and human service organizations. Zimmerman-Oster holds a B.A. from the University of Detroit and M.A. and Ph.D. degrees from Wayne State University. She joined the University in 1990.

Christopher Zorski

Associate Professor of Accounting, teaches financial and cost accounting. Zorski’s publications deal with marketing and organizational structure of accounting firms. He has also published a book on the subject of personnel policy. Zorski holds a master’s degree and Ph.D. from University of Warsau. He passed the CPA exam in the State of Michigan. Zorski joined the University in 1985.

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