College of Engineering and Science

Graduate Programs Office:

Office:
Engineering Building, Room E 246
McNichols Campus
Dean: Leo E. Hanifin
Associate Deans:
Arthur C. Haman
Kenneth L. Henold
Telephone: (313) 993-3334
Fax: (313) 993-1187
E-mail:clayvc@udmercy.edu

Programs Offered

Engineering
ó Civil and Environmental (MEngr, MEM, DEngr)
ó Electrical and Computer (MEngr, MEM, DEngr)
ó Engineering Management (MEM)
ó Mechanical (MEngr, MEM, DEngr)
ó Product Development (MS)

Science
ó Chemistry and Biochemistry(MS)
ó Computer Science (MSCS)
ó Teaching of Mathematics (MATM)

Applications, transcripts, and requests for information for these programs should be directed to the College of Engineering and Science, Graduate Programs Office.

As the College of Engineering and Science of a comprehensive, urban, Catholic university, it is our mission to lead in the development of professional engineers, scientists and mathematicians who are uniquely capable and effective in their service to the greater Detroit area, the national and the world communities through the discovery, application and dissemination of knowledge.

Engineering

The College of Engineering and Science offers graduate programs in engineering leading to the degrees of Master of Engineering, Master of Engineering Management and Doctor of Engineering. Applicants for admission to these degree programs must hold an accredited engineering degree and have maintained an overall undergraduate grade point average of B. The College also admits applicants with science degrees upon conditions determined by the Collegeís Graduate Council.

Master of Engineering

The Collegeís engineering departments offer eight concentrations within the Master of Engineering programs:

Civil and Environmental Engineering with concentrations in:
Environmental Engineering
Geotechnical Engineering
Structural Engineering

Electrical and Computer Engineering with concentrations in:
Computer Engineering
Signals and Systems

Mechanical Engineering with concentrations in:
Automotive Engineering
Manufacturing Systems
Thermal Systems

Each engineering concentration sets minimum course requirements. A student may augment a concentration with courses up to six credit hours in mathematics and physical sciences upon approval of the department chairperson.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Engineering programs require a minimum of 30 to 33 credit hours, depending on the concentration. A graduate student in engineering develops a written program of study in consultation with a faculty advisor. A minimum of 21 credit hours must be in graduate courses numbered 500 or above. Programs of study may also require a thesis (six credits) or two research papers, depending on the concentration and degree. A student submits the program of study to the Engineering Graduate Council for approval before completing 12 credit hours. Prior to the councilís approval of the complete program of study, the department chair approves a studentís course selection. Complete details on concentrations and requirements appear under the specific engineering departments. If a student takes a course outside of the college, the inclusion of either the credit or quality points earned in the studentís program requires the prior written permission of the dean.

Transfer Credit

Students without a previous graduate degree may transfer up to six credits from another graduate school or program. Students with a previous graduate degree may transfer nine credits if either graduate program is less than 36 hours, or up to 12 credits if both graduate programs are at least 36 hours. In all cases, transfer of credit is granted only with the approval of the program director and the dean after completing 12 credit hours at the University of Detroit Mercy with a minimum overall quality point average of 3.0.

Master of Engineering Management

The College of Engineering and Science, in collaboration with the College of Business Administration, offers the Master of Engineering Management for experienced engineers who desire additional technical depth and the ability to manage major technological resources.

Admission Requirements

The Master of Engineering Management program accepts applicants who are currently employed full-time as engineers, hold an undergraduate degree in engineering and have at least two years of post-baccalaureate industrial experience. Applicants with degrees in physical sciences also may apply.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Engineering Management requires 36 credit hours beyond the baccalaureate degree: 21 credit hours in the Engineering Management Core and 15 credit hours in technical areas of interest.

Transfer Credit

A student with a previous masterís degree may request to transfer courses but must complete a minimum of 24 credit hours at the University.

Master of Engineering Management Courses

Five Engineering Management Core Courses:

EM 501 Engineering Management

EM 502 Engineering Economics

EM 503 Engineering Accounting

EM 504 Engineering Administration

MBA 520 Modeling and Executive Decision Making

 

Two Elective Courses from among the following recommended list:
BUS 516 Marketing Management

BUS 519 Production and Operation Management

MBA 526 Management Information Systems

MBA 533 Operations Research

MBA 535 System Simulation

MBA 550 Product Planning and Development

Five Technical Elective Courses

See Department Course Lists

Master of Science in Product Development

The College of Engineering and Science and the College of Business Administration, together offer the Master of Science in Product Development. This program was developed in cooperation with Massachusetts Institute of Technology and five major U.S. corporations. The program is focused specifically on the automobile industry and targets experienced engineers that will lead product development/manufacturing activities into the 21st century. The program features both technical and business content and intense classroom interactions with an array of seminars and case studies conducted in conjunction with partner companies. The curriculum is challenging and rigorous; it is intended for students who will lead engineering, not leave engineering.

Admission Requirements

Applicants will be considered if they have excellent academic records, a BS or higher in engineering or computer science and five or more years of work experience in industry, government or academia. Alternate qualifications include an MS in engineering with three or more years of work experience in industry, government or academia.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Science in Product Development requires 45 credit hours consisting of 39 credit hours of course work and a six credit hour capstone project/thesis. The program is a two calendar-year (six term) experience beginning with an intensive full-time two week launch experience, followed by two courses per term for six terms.

Doctor of Engineering

The Doctor of Engineering program prepares engineers to apply their analytical and experimental skills to engineering design, development, manufacturing, research and management. Candidates focus their research on industrial challenges that require the development and application of new engineering knowledge, analytical methods and experimental systems and tools.

Admission Requirements

A student interested in the Doctor of Engineering degree submits an application for admission to the doctoral program to the Engineering Graduate Council for the College of Engineering and Science. Students must demonstrate high academic achievement and an indication of the ability to engage in advanced engineering and research.

Degree Requirements

The Doctor of Engineering program includes the following post baccalaureate components:

A. Completion of the following four courses:

E 502 Design of Experiments and Quality Control

E 510 Computer Applications in Experimentation

E 520 Optimization for Engineering Problems

E 530 Advanced Engineering Mathematics

B. Thirty credit hours of course work in a specific discipline including any depart-mental graduate core.

C. A minimum of nine credit hours in approved technical electives.

D. Thirty-six credit hours of dissertation, at least 30 of which must be taken after successful completion of the final qualifying examination described below.

A doctoral student discusses appropriate dissertation topics with the graduate faculty of the College during the first semester of the doctoral program. The student then meets with the department chairperson to discuss a dissertation topic and to propose a dissertation research advisor from among the faculty. If the faculty member accepts, the chairperson appoints that faculty member as chairperson of the studentís Studies Committee.

A studentís Studies Committee includes the department chairperson and two members of the engineering and science graduate faculty. The studentís program of study must be planned with and approved in writing by the Studies Committee before the doctoral studentís second term in the doctoral program. The College requires that a doctoral student complete a minimum of 51 credit hours of course work beyond the engineering baccalaureate.

All doctoral students must spend one full academic year (two consecutive terms) enrolled as full-time students (nine hours minimum). This usually consists of coursework and the dissertation and may be combined with an internship.

Transfer Credit

The maximum amount of course credits transferred into the Doctor of Engineering Program is 30 credit hours and must be approved by the department chair and the dean. At least 21 credit hours must be taken exclusively from University of Detroit Mercy. All courses transferred must have been taken at the graduate level and must be directly relevant to the studentís doctoral focus. These transfer courses do not eliminate the need to complete the core course requirements unless there is a specific equivalency determined between a core course(s) and a transferred course(s).

In addition, a student who has completed a masterís thesis may transfer up to six credit hours of thesis credit toward the doctoral dissertation research requirement of 36 credit hours.

Academic Standards

The College of Engineering and Science seeks to have its graduate students excel in their studies. The doctoral studentís Program Studies chairperson and Studies Committee participate in the evaluation of the studentís suitability for doctoral studies as well as monitor the studentís progress toward completion of the doctoral program.

The College of Engineering and Science requires doctoral students to maintain an overall grade point average (GPA) of 3.0 or better and to meet minimum standards of quality in order to continue doctoral studies. Rate of progress, grades earned in individual courses, research ability and other factors are reviewed by the Graduate Council at the end of each term to determine a studentís continued enrollment in the doctoral program. A student who receives an unsatisfactory review based on these factors may be dismissed from the doctoral program at the end of any term. A doctoral student whose cumulative GPA falls below 3.0 at the end of any term is dismissed from the doctoral program.

Qualifying Examinations

All doctoral students must pass two qualifying examinations.

The first qualifying examination consists of mathematics, departmental specific engineering and computer programming components. Doctoral students must complete all parts of the first examination during the first year after admission to the program.

The second and final qualifying examination consists of the preparation and presentation of the doctoral dissertation proposal, proposal evaluation and a general oral examination in engineering, mathematics, and related principles as required by the Studies Committee.

The Doctoral Qualifying Committee, chaired by the studentís Studies Committee chairperson, administers the final qualifying examination. The Doctoral Qualifying Committee includes the Studies Committee, one member of the College of Engineering and Science from a department outside the studentís major and a faculty member from a university other than the University of Detroit Mercy. The dean of the College of Engineering and Science is responsible for all Doctoral Qualifying Committee appointments.

To take the final qualifying examination, a student must have successfully completed the first qualifying examination; must be registered as a full time student for the semester in which he/she appears for the final qualifying examination; and must have the permission of the Studies Committee chairperson.

The Doctoral Qualifying Committee determines a studentís successful completion of the final qualifying examination with no more than one dissenting vote. A doctoral student must successfully complete the final qualifying examination within three years of admission to the doctoral program.

Candidacy

A student is considered for candidacy in the Doctor of Engineering program by the Engineering Graduate Council at the first meeting of the council after the student successfully completes the final qualifying examination.

A student is approved for candidacy by a majority of the council. Approval for candidacy indicates that the student has met all requirements through the doctoral qualifying examination, including requirements established by the final Doctoral Qualifying Committee. Approval for candidacy permits a student to continue work on the dissertation.

All doctoral students must register for a minimum of six credit hours each term after passing the final qualifying examination until they complete all requirements for the Doctor of Engineering degree.

A student who prefers a dissertation with a design or development focus can do so, thereby gaining experience in significant non-technical aspects of engineering. Opportunities exist for the student to work on the dissertation in industrial settings through the Collegeís highly successful industrial internship program.

It is not necessary for doctoral students to complete their dissertation through an internship. A variety of more traditional research problems provides the basis for doctoral dissertations and can be carried out in the Universityís research laboratories.

Final Examination

A final public oral examination in defense of the dissertation is administered during the studentís final term of work. The Defense Committee consists of at least the members of the final Doctoral Qualifying Committee. A student must pass with unanimous approval of the Defense Committee. The decision of this committee is final. All requirements for the doctorate must be completed within seven years of admission to the doctoral program. In addition to the university grading system, a grade of "D" in a 400-level course will be included in a studentís academic record but will not count toward graduation.

Civil and Environmental Engineering

Chairperson: Utpal Dutta
Office: Engineering 262
McNichols Campus
Telephone:(313) 993-1040
Fax:(313) 993-1187
E-mail:duttau@udmercy.edu

The Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering specializes in environmental, geotechnical and structural engineering. Environmental engineering deals with water and wastewater treatment, chemical and biological unit operations, hazardous waste treatment and pollution prevention. Structural engineering emphasizes finite element methods, computer aided structural analysis and design, pre-stressed concrete and plastic analysis. Geotechnical engineering focuses on advanced concepts in soil mechanics, soil dynamics, tunneling, earth dams and pavement design.

Detroit and its environs provide the Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering with large-scale local engineering activities and facilities, including research and development, industrial operations and civil construction. These opportunities offer the engineering student a stimulating environment for study and considerable future employment potential.

The Civil and Environmental Engineering Program prepares students for careers as consulting engineers, engineers in industry and government and researchers for university and industrial laboratories.

Degree Requirements

Admission and degree requirements conform to those for the University and the College of Engineering and Science.

The Master of Engineering with a concentration in environmental/geotechnical/ structural engineering may be completed by a thesis or non-thesis plan. The thesis plan requires six credit hours of thesis and 24 credit hours or more of course work. The non-thesis plan includes a total of 30 credit hours (30-39 hours in environmental engineering depending on background) of course work.

Courses offered in civil and environmental engineering may be supplemented with approved courses in mathematics, chemistry, biology, other branches of engineering, law and other areas to suit the studentís individual needs. Suggested Civil and Environmental Engineering courses in each of the specializations appear in the box. Additional courses also are available. Doctoral students must satisfy all requirements for the Doctor of Engineering program in the College of Engineering and Science.

Environmental Engineering
CE 450 Water and Wastewater Treatment

CE 451 Water and Wastewater Treatment Laboratory

CE 453 Applied Hydraulics and Hydrology

CE 484 Environmental Chemistry and Design

CE 486 Environmental Microbiology and Design

CE 578* Physicochemical Unit Operations

CE 580* Biological Unit Operation

CE 582 Hazardous Waste

CE 584 Groundwater Hydrology

CE 588 Solid Waste

CE 590 Air Pollution

MBA 571 Environmental Law


Geotechnical Engineering
CE 474 Advanced Steel Design

CE 476 Advanced Concrete Design

CE 478* Foundation Engineering

CE 480* Design of Earth Retention Systems

CE 542 Dynamics of Foundations and Soils

CE 548 Advanced Soil Mechanics

CE 554 Earth Dams

CE 558 Soft Ground Tunneling

CE 574 Advanced Pavement Design

E 442 Finite Element Methods

AR 559 Construction Law


Structural Engineering
CE 440* Structural Dynamics

CE 474 Advanced Steel Design

CE 476 Advanced Concrete Design

CE 478 Foundation Engineering

CE 480 Design of Earth Retention Systems

CE 560 Advanced Structural Analysis

CE 566 Bridge Design

CE 576 Prestressed Concrete Design

E 442* Finite Element Methods

ME 534 Finite Elements II

*Core Courses

Electrical and Computer Engineering

Chairperson: Nizar Al-Holou
Office: Engineering 331
McNichols Campus
Telephone:(313) 993-3365
Fax:(313) 993-1187
E-mail:alholoun@udmercy.edu

The Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering offers graduate degrees with specializations in computer engineering and signals and systems. Students may elect to complete a Master of Engineering, Master of Engineering Management, or Doctor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering.

Degree Requirements

The Master of Engineering in Electrical Engineering may be completed by either a thesis or a non-thesis plan. The thesis plan includes 24 credit hours of coursework, six credit hours of thesis, and an oral presentation of the thesis to the departmental thesis committee and the public. The non-thesis plan consists of 30 credits hours of coursework. A studentís plan of study must consist of at least seven courses with a 500 level designation. Furthermore, the studentís program of study must consist of no fewer than six courses from the Electrical and Computer Engineering Department.

The Doctor of Engineering in Electrical Engineering adheres to the Collegeís requirements for admission to and candidacy in a Doctor of Engineering program. Students are required to complete the doctoral core courses with the exception of E 510 (which is not for EE students). In addition to the nine credits of core requirements students must complete 30 credit hours of course work in a specific discipline, 12 credit hours of approved technical electives (500 level or 400 level with special approval) and 36 credit hours of dissertation. All doctoral and master programs of study must be approved by the faculty advisor/committee and the department chairperson.

Concentration in Computer Engineering

The computer engineering specialization is a program focused on the design and development of embedded computer/control systems. This focus uniquely addresses the needs of the Southeastern Michigan industrial community. The program seeks to provide students with the ability to design real-time distributed microcontroller-based systems commonly found in automotive and manufacturing environments. Career opportunities in this area are excellent.

Concentration in Computer Engineering (Masterís)

 

Core Requirements:
CSC 441 Object Oriented Programming

CSC 443 Data Structures

EE 578/579 Embedded Systems

EE 580 Computer Architecture

Six Courses from the following list:

CSC 542 Automata Theory

CSC 547 Systems Programming

CSC 548 Artificial Intelligence

EE 558 Advanced Electronics

EE 564 Hardware Description Languages - VHDL

EE 568 Computer Networks

EE 586 Advanced Microprocessors

EE 588 Digital Signal Processing I

EE 594 Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineering

E 478 Mechatronics

(Other courses may be substituted with permission of the chairperson.)

 

Concentration in Signals and Systems

The signals and systems specialization provides a background in digital signal and image processing, and control systems. The advent of high-speed specialized digital signal processor integrated circuits has spurred rapid development in this area (witness cellular phones, CD and DVD players, and HDTV systems). The subsequent demand for specialists in this field has created excellent career opportunities. Students completing this program will have both the theoretical background and practical experience to design and develop quality products in this market.

Concentration in Signals and Systems (Masterís)

Core Requirements:

EE 558 Advanced Electronics

EE 588 Digital Signal Processing I

Eight courses from the following list:

EE 466 Electromagnetics II

EE 470 Controls II

EE 474 Communications II

EE 490 Radiation and Antennas                                                                                                     

 

EE 560 CAD in Integrated Circuits

EE 562 Random Variables and Random Processes

EE 574 Pattern Recognition

EE 576 Digital Control

EE 578/579 Embedded Systems

EE 584 Electromagnetic Compatibility

EE 586 Advanced Microprocessors

EE 590 Digital Signal Processing II

EE 594 Advanced Topics in Electrical Engineering

E 478 Mechatronics

(Other courses may be substituted with the permission of the chairperson.)

 

 

Mechanical Engineering

Chairperson: Mark R. Schumack
Office: Engineering 214
McNichols Campus
Telephone:(313) 993-3370
Fax:(313) 993-1187
E-mail:schumamr@udmercy.edu

The Department of Mechanical Engineering offers graduate degrees with concentrations in three areas:
ó Manufacturing Systems
ó Automotive Engineering
ó Thermal Systems

Degree Requirements

The Mechanical Engineering graduate program is student-centered, providing high-quality instruction in both theory and the latest engineering developments. Nearly all graduate faculty members hold doctorates in engineering, and most bring significant industrial experience to the classroom. For the working person, all our classes are held in the late afternoon and evening. Many of our full-time graduate students obtain paid internships in local industry for one or two terms during their course of study.

The Master of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering may be completed through either a thesis or non-thesis plan. The thesis plan includes 24 credit hours of course work and six credit hours of thesis. The non-thesis plan consists of 30 credit hours of course work plus a three-credit hour capstone design course. The project-based design course assesses the studentís ability to synthesize material covered in the graduate curriculum.

All students are required to take at least one advanced mathematics course. Highly recommended are E 530 (Advanced Engineering Mathematics) or MTH 527 (Probability and Statistics). Design of Experiments (E 502) is also required of all students. Each student will have two additional required core courses dependent upon the chosen concentration as follows:

 

Manufacturing Systems

ME 530 Advanced Topics in Metal Cutting or

ME 532 Advanced Topics in Metal Forming

ME 594 Manufacturing Systems

 

Automotive Engineering (any two of the following)
ME 534 Finite Element Methods

ME 572 Noise, Vibration, and Harshness

ME 576 Vehicle Dynamics

 

Thermal Systems
E 504 Conduction Heat Transfer

E 548 Advanced Fluid Mechanics

The Doctor of Engineering in Mechanical Engineering requires that students complete the doctoral core courses, the core courses for one concentration, as well as nine credit hours in a related discipline and 36 credit hours of dissertation.

Concentration in Manufacturing Systems

The manufacturing systems concentration provides students with modern scientific training in manufacturing engineering. Career opportunities in manufacturing systems are excellent. This program educates students to deal effectively with the complex manufacturing systems prevalent in industry today.

 

Manufacturing Systems Concentration Courses
E 580 Engineering Materials I

E 582 Engineering Materials II

ME 482 Computer-Aided Manufacturing

ME 488 Reliability in Design

ME 492 Computer-Aided Engineering

ME 530 Advanced Topics in Metal Cutting

ME 532 Advanced Topics in Metal Forming

ME 534 Finite Element Methods

ME 570 Composites in Design

ME 582 Mechanical Metallurgy

|ME 590 Robotics in Manufacturing

ME 594 Manufacturing Systems

Concentration in Automotive Systems

The application of mechanical engineering to the automotive industry has taken new directions as critical technologies are incorporated into vehicles. The concentration in automotive engineering prepares graduates to design quality products in this highly competitive international market.

 

Automotive Engineering Concentration Courses
E 444 Vibrations

E 548 Advanced Fluid Mechanics

E 504 Conduction Heat Transfer

E 506 Convection Heat Transfer

E 580 Engineering Materials I

E 582 Engineering Materials II

ME 458 Internal Combustion Engines I

ME 459 Internal Combustion Engines Laboratory

ME 492 Computer-Aided Engineering

ME 534 Finite Element Methods

ME 572 Noise, Vibration and Harshness

ME 576 Vehicle Dynamics

Concentration in Thermal Systems

The study of thermal systems enables the graduate to make substantive contributions to the generation, use and conservation of energy.

Thermal Systems Concentration Courses
E 504 Conduction Heat Transfer

E 506 Convection Heat Transfer

E 508 Computational Fluid Dynamics and Heat Transfer

E 530 Advanced Engineering Mathematics

E 548 Advanced Fluid Mechanics

ME 480 Energy Systems

ME 492 Computer-Aided Engineering

ME 534 Finite Element Methods

 

Required Mechanical Engineering Courses

E 502 Design of Experiments

500-level Mathematics Course

Science

The College of Engineering and Science offers graduate programs in science leading to the following degrees:
óChemistry (MS)
óComputer Science (Certificate, MS)
óTeaching of Mathematics (MATM)

Chemistry and Biochemistry

Chairperson: Mark A. Benvenuto
Office:Chemistry C109
McNichols Campus
Telephone:(313) 993-1258
Fax:(313) 993-1144
E-mail:schleyja@udmercy.edu

The Master of Science in Chemistry is a degree designed for the student who is currently working in a chemically-related field and/or wishes to prepare for more advanced studies in chemistry. Chemists need to be well versed in several branches of chemistry in order to solve current and future chemical research problems. The Master of Science in Chemistry degree allows the student to acquire a well-rounded, advanced education in chemistry, as well as specialization and research in polymers and materials, biochemistry, and computational chemistry.

Admission Requirements

Applicants for admission to graduate studies leading to the Master of Science in Chemistry degree must present an undergraduate major in chemistry or its equivalent with a minimum GPA of 3.0 in the major field and an overall GPA of 2.75 (or at least in the last 60 hours). Such prior work must be essentially equivalent to that required by the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department for a bachelor of science degree as set forth in the current University of Detroit Mercy Undergraduate Catalog. Applicants whose undergraduate preparation does not satisfy these admission requirements may be admitted on probationary status to the University with the approvals of the dean of the College of Engineering and Science and the chairperson of the Chemistry and Biochemistry Department. Courses taken to satisfy admission requirements may not be taken for graduate credit.

Degree Requirements

Of the 30 credit hours required for the degree, the following requirements must be met:

ē A minimum of four courses from different branches of chemistry at the 500-level or above.
ē A one-credit course in chemical information and safety (CHM 502).
ē Two semesters of Seminar (CHM 500, 1 credit hour each). During the first semester the student will attend and critique all seminars and will write a literature review paper on a topic of current interest. During the second semester, the student will present a 45-minute seminar on this topic.
ē Full-time students who receive a teaching or research assistantship must perform thesis research and write and defend the thesis. The student will earn six hours of thesis credit (CHM 699). The student must select a research advisor by the end of two terms of study.

A maximum of nine credit hours may be undergraduate/graduate cross-listed courses. A maximum of six credit hours of graduate-level courses from other departments may be applied to the degree. With the chairpersonís approval, entering transfer students may transfer a maximum of 12 credit hours (with a grade of 3.0 or better) from another accredited university. Credits applied to a previous degree may not be transferred.

Mathematics and Computer Science

Chairperson: R. Michael Canjar
Office: Briggs 242
McNichols Campus
Telephone:(313) 993-1209
Fax:(313) 993-1166
E-mail:canjarrm@udmercy.edu

Master of Science in Computer Science

The Master of Science in Computer Science is a 33 credit hour program designed to prepare students for doctoral study or positions in industry or government in computer-related areas. Courses may be selected from areas related to computer science, including primarily quantitative business decisions, software and hardware engineering and mathematics appropriate for the theory of computers or computer applications.

Admission Requirements

In order to be admitted to the program, the applicant must hold a bachelorís degree (or equivalent) and must have completed the following coursework with acceptable grades: Analytic Geometry and Calculus I and II (MTH 141 and MTH 142), Linear Algebra (MTH 402) and a calculus-based probability and/or statistics course (MTH 423 or MTH 427). In addition, students should have at least one year of computer programming in a structured programming language such as Pascal or C. Students may make up deficiencies in undergraduate preparation by taking appropriate courses or their equivalents without graduate credit. Students may make up these deficiencies while completing graduate studies, but may not take graduate courses for which they have not yet satisfied prerequisites.

Degree Requirements

1. A minimum of six courses from the departmentís computer science courses including Object Oriented Programming (CSC 441), Data Structures (CSC 443) and Seminar for Graduate Students (CSC 549). Department computer science courses have the number "4" as the middle number.
2. A minimum of four courses in areas related to computer science. Appropriate offerings from other departments can be selected in consultation with the studentís advisor.
3. An essay submitted to the department on a topic related to computers. The student may satisfy this requirement as part of CSC 549.
4. A minimum of seven exclusively graduate (500) credit courses.
5. Appropriate senior/graduate (400)-level courses as needed for remaining coursework.

Master of Arts in the Teaching of Mathematics

The Master of Arts in the Teaching of Mathematics (M.A.T.M.) degree is offered at two levels: Elementary (for teachers certified to teach in Kindergarten through grade eight) and Secondary (for teachers certified to teach grades seven through twelve).

Admission Requirements

This degree is designed for students who have an interest in teaching mathematics in either elementary or secondary school. Students must have either a teaching certificate or be in the process of earning one, having satisfied the entrance requirements for enrollment in a certification program in education. In particular, a passing score on the Michigan Basic Skills Test is required. Students must also have a bachelorís degree with a minimum GPA 3.0, having met the following prerequisites:

For the Elementary track: two courses introducing concepts of elementary mathematics teaching, listed as MTH 477 and MTH 478 in the UDM Undergraduate Catalog, as well as a mastery of college mathematics up to and including elementary functions (MTH 140 or MTH 480 in the undergraduate catalog).

For the Secondary track: mastery of college mathematics up to and including a year of calculus, listed as MTH 141 and MTH 142 in the UDM Undergraduate Catalog.

Students not meeting all requirements may be admitted provisionally, in which case they are expected to make up their deficiencies while under supervision of their advisor prior to beginning graduate work. Courses taken to satisfy admission requirements may be taken for graduate credit, but do not count toward completion of the degree. Upon completion of these courses, a formal application to the program can be made to the College of Engineering and Science.

Degree Requirements

1. Two graduate courses in education are required (EDU 500 and EDU 600).
2. Three core courses in mathematics education are required (MED 583, MED 584, and MED 586).
3. For the Elementary track, additional required courses are MED 577 and MED 586; for the Secondary track, additional required courses are MED 582, MED 590, and MED 593.
4. For the Elementary track, two electives are selected with the approval of the advisor; in the Secondary track, there is one elective. Electives are chosen from the following: MED 560, MED 570, MED 571, MED 572, MED 577, MED 581, MED 582, MED 586, MED 587, MED 590, or MED 593.
5. The capstone experience of the program, completed after all other work, is the Research Project (MED 599).

The requirements listed above apply to students who are now entering the program. Students admitted prior to the Fall 2001 semester may have different program requirements, and are permitted to retain their older program requirements if desired.